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They are selling the last of the lot, the bottom of the barrel wood wise.
I don't think they are any more or less fragile that any other wood stock rifle, it's just that out of 100,000 or so rifles, a small percentage will have damage, which when seen at one time in one place, seem significant.
How many Garand's, K98's,91/30's, 03A3's were damaged? Many tens of thousands but you don't see all (or even a decent percentage of) them in one place at one time.
 

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There are quite a few M39 that pop up on GB Trader, which are fully described, don't have cracked stocks and photo's provided. This is far and away your best bet to get a great M39. Buying in the blind when the vendor clearly tells you the rifle has a cracked stock is a needless risk/gamble on your part. Condition is everything on a military surplus rifle.

There is this re occurring brain damage about M39's being tough to get so one should buy damaged ones or they will "miss out". You read of folks wanting one...the last chance type of a life time. Now...that is all rubbish. Plenty of M39 around for sale without bad bores and cracked stocks.

Be patient, find a great M39 , don't fall victem to this bad advice by others discounting a cracked stock. They are not giving you best advice and you in the end will suffer consequences.

You don't buy a car with a cracked engine block do you ? Nuff Said on cracked stocks.
 

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There are more than enough M39s in fine condition, no need for a cracked stock. IMO cracked stock rifles should be around $200 considering replacement stocks are not too common. Any repair you do to one may salvage the rifle as a shooter, but won't increase its value.
 

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I have never let an cracked stock, if all of the material is still there, be a determining factor for rejecting a firearm. Wood repairs aren't rocket science to someone who knows their way around a wood shop.

I just wonder that when Classic has finished selling off the "Burned" rifles, will that be the end of the major retail rifles available, or if The Burns bunch still has a stash they contractually held back until Classic got through? Once the commercial retail market thins out the price of poker always goes up.
 

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There are quite a few M39 that pop up on GB Trader, which are fully described, don't have cracked stocks and photo's provided. This is far and away your best bet to get a great M39. Buying in the blind when the vendor clearly tells you the rifle has a cracked stock is a needless risk/gamble on your part. Condition is everything on a military surplus rifle.

There is this re occurring brain damage about M39's being tough to get so one should buy damaged ones or they will "miss out". You read of folks wanting one...the last chance type of a life time. Now...that is all rubbish. Plenty of M39 around for sale without bad bores and cracked stocks.

Be patient, find a great M39 , don't fall victem to this bad advice by others discounting a cracked stock. They are not giving you best advice and you in the end will suffer consequences.

You don't buy a car with a cracked engine block do you ? Nuff Said on cracked stocks.
This!!! +++1. Auction asking prices are also not the reality when considering a local buy of an M39. But when you find a nice one, jump on it as they do not last long.
 

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Most of the M39's used artic birch for the stock and handguard. Artic birch is prone to splits from weather, impacts, and longer lengths. This is why you see plug and popsicle stick wood repairs on some of the stocks. This is one of the reasons the stock forearms are spliced at the time of production. You may encounter splits just behind and beside the receiver tang, in the butt stock area, and on the stock forearm. From the ones I've see repaired the popsicle repairs were done on the forearm areas and the plugs in the butt stock areas. The handguards were made of thin wood and you can find small splits on the top of the guard where the wood might flex from barrel heat or impacts. I had a post war model with a small split on the handguard but the wood was still intact. A quality superglue is great for those repairs because oil residues left in the wood won't affect it's adhesion and while wet you can wipe off any excess coming out of the crack. Once the superglue had dried I also put a light coating of clear epoxy glue on the inside. From the outside the repair is hard to see unless you're looking closely.

I had a VKT stock that had a small split on the side near the receiver tang. I opened the split to let the super glue flow to the bottom of the split, applied some wood clamps, and wiped off any excess glue. The hair line crack area is visble but the repair is solid.These were splits that still had all of the wood near the split intact. I have a 41 sako straight stock that had a gouge and small piece of wood missing just behind the bayonet lug area but the area was still solid elsewhere. I filled the area with a stainable plastic wood filler, when dry I sanded both the out and inside areas down, and then match stained the wood. From the outside the repair could be missed by the average person. I debated on making this repair because it could have be sharpnel damage but I couldn't verifly that, I like my firearms looking nice, so I repaired the damage.

One of the reasons the wood splits just behind the receiver tang is because the receiver lug area has play in it, the action screws are loose, and there is a small open space between the tang and the stock. When the receiver can move in the stock each recoil can bump the tang against the wood.This can effect accuracy but also damage the stock around the receiver tang area.

When you take an M39 apart most of the time you will find small metal shims on the bottom of the receiver lug hole on the stock.These shims were used for floating the barrel in the stock forearm and from some articles to level the action in the stock. Sometimes you will also find a smaller metal shim nailed to the backside of the lug hole to help stop the back and forth movement during recoil. Many of the rifles will also have an oval metal shim in the area where the tang bolts down. Some of the Russian model Mosins will also have metal oval shims on the bottom of the stock under the magazine housing. Over the years since these rifles were correctly shimed at the factory it's hard to say what was removed and not put back or if the wood has changed and reshimming is needed.They do sell metal shim kits that will fit all models of Mosins and cork sheets for the 91/30 full length barrels.

On the two M39's and one 91/30 I actually shot for accuracy I bedded the areas around both action screws instead of using shims.This eliminates the back and forth movement and improves the accuracy in most cases. On the M39's the barrel will still have to be floated and the full length 91/30's in the original stock will still need sheet cork bedding in the stock forearm area to prevent hot barrel movement.

Milprileb made a good point about buying the rifle in person if possible especially with the Russian and other com-block models. What concerns me more than the wood on a mail order rifle is what kind of condition the bore is in and the bore diameter. I can easily fix stock, headspace, bolt, bluing, and trigger problems but if the bore is shot out or the chamber is damaged then that will require more time and money. The good news is the M39 barrels were better quality than most other Mosin models to begin with and they seemed to be taken better care of. I slugged three of my M39 barrels and they were all in the .3105 range so I can use the same diameter of bullets to reload for all of them. The Russain models can vary in bore diameters.

As far as your damaged stock, it's too far damaged to be repaired I would think the dealer is going to reduce the price of the rifle quite a bit especially if they bought pallets of them to begin with. A M39 stock replacement will run over $100 if it is beyond repair and has to be replaced if you can find one. If you're a purist and want the same replacement stock then the search will be harder and more expensive. To me on an M39 if the bore and chamber was nice and there was no rust pitting but the stock was damaged, I would go $250 and my tops would be $300. Once you reach the $300 mark on an M39 then you can spend a little more and find one in overall good condition. The model will also determine the price. From what I've seen lately the VKT's bring the least. The Sakos will bring more and the special models like the 41 straight stocks, the SKY's, the Tikka's, and the No Name's will bring even more. If you're not a purist, the barreled action is good, the wood stock is too far gone to repair, and the price is right, then consider an after market stock.

I have a 44 Sako barreled action I picked up several years ago in an ATI stock ($70) with a pistol scope. I bedded the action screws and floated the barrel. It's light weight, a great brush gun for deer, and with handloads it will shoot one inch groups at 100 yards. Now that Archangel ($145) has most of the bugs worked out of their Mosin stock I put a 1967 barreled action in one. The stock feels nice, the magazines work fine, and it will group as well or better was the ATI model with the same handloads. Once I install a standard scope, a drop in Timney trigger, and tune the handloads on the Archangel I imagine it will give my Rem.700 a run for the money on the target board. There are at least two stock companies that produce after market stocks for Mosins. You can buy almost any design or wood color you want ranging from $100 on up. The M39's from my experience are so much easier to tune for accuracy than the 91/30. One thing you must do with any stock other than the original is inlet the wood around the rear sight since it's larger than the com-block Mosins, which is no big deal. Hopefully this long rant helped.
 

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Might be the operating system and/or version of browser. Until I updated my Linux a while back, I could not make paragraph breaks with the outdated browser I was using.
Right. *nix (linux and Mac) uses linefeeds, and Windows uses carriage return/linefeed. If your system was only passing a linefeed to the recipient system that makes perfect sense.
 

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Right. *nix (linux and Mac) uses linefeeds, and Windows uses carriage return/linefeed. If your system was only passing a linefeed to the recipient system that makes perfect sense.
I'm using Linux Mint 17.3, and Firefox updates regularly, so the Linux versions are now correctly interpreting ". ENTER" as a paragraph break.

Linux is to Windows what SAKO (or VKT) is to Mosin Nagant!
 

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if their cracked at the rear bolt there's a chance of them cracking more if shot is why most people like ones not cracked better. this comes from action screw being loose and firing them that way. i think these will always be out there for sale you just to keep looking and wait for them to come up. but everyones different i just didn't like buying any with cracks.
 

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if their cracked at the rear bolt there's a chance of them cracking more if shot is why most people like ones not cracked better. this comes from action screw being loose and firing them that way. i think these will always be out there for sale you just to keep looking and wait for them to come up. but everyones different i just didn't like buying any with cracks.
A crack is not always a "death sentence" if located where it can be pinned.

My M28/30 had a crack in the wood between the trigger hole and the magazine well. I got a kit from Brownell's with some threaded brass pins and Acraglass. Finnish armorers would have used wood dowels, but the threaded pins are less conspicuous.

So if the M39 has an excellent bore, 90% or better blue, and nicely figured birch, bargain the price down because of the crack, and then repair it.
 

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Started collecting M39 about eleven years ago, at the highest point I had 18 of them. Classic didn't put their hands on these!



 
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