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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a few questions for some experts. I have a 1942 VKT M39, postwar stock still looks like it went through WW2 with dings & nicks. My tang is scrubbed & I am trying to figure out who made my receiver by all the other small markings around the tang. They are mostly little lines or other faint marks that have no meaning to me, they look like quality control marks. I have looked on both 7.62x54r.net & Mosin Nagant.net & none of these marks are in their lists. There is an R on the receiver below the woodline but it is not in a circle & it is very small. I had to use a magnifing glass to look at it. Small capital R with no circle. Also on the top of the tang there is a large 2 and something in a circle that has been peened out. I figure its a P, C or R in the circle. That would make the receiver a Remington or Chatellrault(sp?). There aren't alot of proofs around the recoil lug like I see on alot of Soviet Mosins. Another mystery is the barrel shank is marked VKT & everything else is standard. However under the woodline on the bottom of the barrel shank is a very small Tikkakoski logo, A capital T in a triangle. It also has a terrible Russian trigger in it. Who made it then, barrel & rec.?

Now I also have a 1945 Izy M44 & I am trying to figure out for sure that it was not a refurb. It has a deep blued finish, was nearly unfired or maybe unfired when I picked it out of a crate. It is a PW Arms import. The bolt is absolutely new, very tight when you take it out of the rifle the bolt head & connector doesnt wiggle around or shake. All parts on the entire rifle have the same Izy arrow in triangle, NO mixed parts at all. No refurb markings on the barrel shank or stock. I think it is a mid-late 1945, it has the narrow front base, later model bayo lug & high wall receiver. Entire rifle is very tight, trigger pull is excellent & crisp. Stock has standard SSE. The main thing that is throwing me off is that all the numbers are matching Electro-Pencil, its not scrubbed or lined-out & was never stamped matching. Buttplate, bolt body & floorplate all have AE 2201 nicely written. All the parts appear to be original to the rifle. The only odd mark is a "ln" or "l, backwards r" type mark near the POA proof that was added sometime after the rifle was built, but is very clean & signifies something. I don't know what to make of it.

Any help with these would be greatly appreciated, Thanks. Norinco
 

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The Finn.
The presence of Latin letters indicate two things:
1) The receiver was made by Chatellerault, New England Westinghouse, Remington.
2) The receiver was checked by some country that uses Latin alphabet.
Which one is correct? It is anybody's guess, it could be first, it could second, it could be both since Finland bought rifles from Germany, Austria, Poland, etc.


The M44.
The electropenciled numbers mean that the rifle was reworked. For comparison, in the worst fighting of WWII, in 1942 and 1943, the rifles left factory with stamped serial numbers. Your rifle was not made in the worst period, it should have stamped serial number too, but it does not. It has been reworked.
 

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OK, I needed to know. On the stamped serial numbers, if something is stamped then that is THE original part for that rifle? For instance I once had a 1926 Izy ex-Dragoon all stamped matching #61,000. Does that mean the rifle had all its original parts? Thanks, Norinco
 

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OK, I needed to know. On the stamped serial numbers, if something is stamped then that is THE original part for that rifle? For instance I once had a 1926 Izy ex-Dragoon all stamped matching #61,000. Does that mean the rifle had all its original parts? Thanks, Norinco
Impossible to say.

For example. Earlier this month I posted about a rifle in local store that had serial number 3. If I remember right, that rifle had a butt plate where old serial number was crossed out and new serial number, 3, was stamped on it. In this case it is easy to see that a part has been reused. However, imagine if the repair deport used a new blank part, then it is impossible to determine if the part is original to the rifle and was there when rifle left the factory or if the part is a replacement.

What we know for sure is that when new rifle left the factory, it had the serial numbers stamped on barrel, floor plate and butt plate.
 
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