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"This is most likely an arsennel rebuild that saw a lot of action. All matching serialized parts except for the stock number. The action is unique for the time with a turned down recurved bolt, with a stock cutout(usually found on the carbines, not the short rifle)."

Some really lucky winner dawgoneit!
I just wonder how the seller would feel if he knew he did sell a "carbine.":eek:
 

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I got really lucky on this one! I couldn't believe it didn't go out of sight in the last hour. The seller e-mailed and knows it went for much less than it's worth.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
jjkr I had my eye on it,but alas am broke.
 

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....congratulations..........wish I would have seen it-I think I'd have broken into the cookie jar....my grandfather carried one of those...
 

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Rifleman, not to be mean but I'm glad you happened to be broke this past weekend cause I couldn't have gone much higher myself.

Herr Mario, when and where did your grandfather carry one of these?
 

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Congrats big time jjkr! :)

I'm curious about that myself Herr Mario. My Granpa was in the States before these were made (1911) but some of my kin no doubt carried some.
 

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Nice type one cavalry carbine! does the bolt match the receiver serial number?
 

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I don't have any personal experience of these nor any great knowledge. But just by referring to Branko's book, there are some... problems.
The serial number (148,XXX) puts the rifle made in 1931.
The side rail marking is that used from 1932.
The Petar II stock cartouche which dates from 1934.

The serial # should put the rifle produced pretty near the middle of 1931 so it doesn't seem likely the rifle lapped over into 1932 or that the rail markings actually began that much earlier. But that's not impossible.

The stock could have been replaced after 1934 accounting for the cartouche. Another possibility is that it could have been first built as a rifle and converted to a carbine after 1934. It seems to me I recall John Wall saying it seems most of these carbines date in that later period.(but I won't swear to that)
But that still doesn't account for the discrepancy between serial# & rail marking.

I don't for a minute believe it was faked. The component parts themselves are worth considerably more than he paid for it.

Hey! What's the stock finish???
 

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Thats great info Nothernug! Thanks. The stock finish is that controversial shiney coating type finish and I'm pretty certain its original. The stock number does not match the rest of the gun so this probably explains the cartouch.
 

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Here's some more, and encouraging, info from Branko...

"Well, this is nice carbine. But, I hope to make all clear about Year of production.>
Name Military Tehnical Institute is from March 4, 1931. My supposition is -new factory name started from new, 1932 year. But, now it's clear - Kragujevac started production of M24 with new name on the receiver immediately in April 1931.
Name Kingdom of Yugoslavia is from October 3, 1929 on the receiver. Well, rifle is finished in Kragujevac in 1931. In Table 4-2 page 92, critical is years 1931-1932. I must approximately separate serial numbers from115,461 to 172,260 on two years because there's no data when exactly started use of new receiver name Vojno-Tehnicki Zavod &
Cypher Peter II of Yugoslavia.
My opinion is: after 1934, infantry rifle is adopted to cavalry carbine and only is replacement stock, bolt body with turned-down bolt handle and sling swivels."


That help? :)
 

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Great info, thanks. The stock as I stated earlier has a different number. It is 185135. Does this number fall into the 1934 production year? If it does, maybe this would solve the cartouche mystery.
 

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Great info, thanks. The stock as I stated earlier has a different number. It is 185135. Does this number fall into the 1934 production year? If it does, maybe this would solve the cartouche mystery.
Actually, no. That number falls in 1932. Does there appear to be a spot near the cartouche that may have had the old cartouche sanded and a later one stamped in it's place?
 
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