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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Ladies and Gents, my good friends on the "Firing Line Forum" told me I should post this here and to not alter the rifle in question. Many thanks in advance.

Many years ago when I was in my teens, I saw a magazine advertisement for military surplus rifles, $50 apiece or two for $75. I pooled my paper route money and bought two, one Mauser and one Mosin. They arrived in old boxes, wrapped in waxed paper and packed (and I mean PACKED) in some sort of heavy yellowish grease, probably Cosmoline. It took me three days to clean up the Mauser and it was such a pain in the keyster that I left the Mosin in the box. Fast forward 36 years: Yesterday I finally got around to breaking out the Mosin and cleaning it up some, still a long way to go. In any event, the bore is in great shape, rifling intact throughout and the metal overall is in great shape with the exception of the clamping rings around the fore-stock, they are corroded a wee bit. Near as I can tell by doing some research on the net, I have a Mosin Nagant model 24, the underside of the barrel is stamped Bohler-Stahl, the top of the barrel has a Christmas Tree stamp with an “S” enclosed in some sort of double triangle underneath the Tree stamp. I’m was looking for a project. Any comments would be appreciated as I’m NOT a Mosin firearms collector and know very little about curios and relics.

Regards,
Nick
 

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Yep. That is exactly what you have.

And by the previous friends posting, I hope that you reconsider putting this rifle through a "modernization" of any sorts. Once you do that, the whole value of the rifle will be nothing next to what its worth now.

Sit back, grab a beer or pop, and check out the parent site: www.mosinnagant.net and read a wealth of knowledge.

Welcome to Gunboards!
 

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I think that any of us would glad to trade you a run of the mill refurbed Mosin Nagant that you could modify to you hearts content. ;)

Seriously, please consider selling it to a collector, and use the money for a better project.
 

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I think that any of us would glad to trade you a run of the mill refurbed Mosin Nagant that you could modify to you hearts content. ;)

Seriously, please consider selling it to a collector, and use the money for a better project.

Or use the money to get 3-4 project 91/30's
 

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Nick,

You have a project. Completely strip it down and scrub all of the metal down with a nylon brush and good oil. And as Sean suggested, read about it on Mosinnagant.net. I just read the article. Only 27,000 were ever made, how many survive in good condition, who knows. You also have a matching bolt, very good. You don't have to be a Mosin Nagant rifle collector to appreciate a fine and rare rifle. If you shoot, you have a very accurate rifle. Cleaning the bore is also a project. Does it have any markings on the right side of the butt stock? Looks like the metal is in fine condition. Can we see photos of the whole stock, barrel and parts? Congrats, and yea don't change a thing except detail it up and coat with oil. You could coat the wood with lemon oil to feed the old dry wood and not change anything. Not the inside.

Lancebear
 

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Remove the barrel and receiver from the stock. Look at the bottom side of the tang.
That is where the date of manufacture is stamped.
If the receiver was made before 1899, the gun is an antique, and worth even more.
 

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I would be more than happy to trade you a modern sporting arm for the M24! Please, please, please leave 'er as is. And thanks for sharing the photos and story!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don’t worry, I respect history and the tools that made it. I would however like to restore this rifle; therefore, what resources are available to me? Also, if it would be better to leave it in its current state; what should I do to preserve it, because I stripped the old preservative off!
 

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It does not need restored. I take it that the preservative was the cosmoline ? The rifle looks just fine to me. Maintian it with a little oil/lube and it will be fine. It's the way it was. Shoot, clean and enjoy. Also, Congratulations on your wisdom from so many years ago and thank you.
 

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Welcome to the boards.

As already posted, you have a pretty rare rifle, and I am sure that any number of members here (including myself), would gladly trade you a common date refurbished M91/30 or two for it, if you feel you absolutely MUST modify a Mosin Nagant.

From your pictures, there is nothing that needs "restoration" beyond a good cleaning. IMO, avoid the brushes, and just wipe off the stock with a clean rag. If the stock begins to sweat more cosmoline, just rub it down again. I would avoid any type of permanent modification, such as drilling and tapping, as such an act would destroy a lot of its' value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, I only removed some of the Cosmoline and I will leave it as is; however, I will shoot it! Also, according Mr. Thomas my rifle is and I quote:

"A few m/24’s of both Swiss and German barrel manufacture have a large “arrow” stamped on the top of the barrel either below or above the Civil Guard shield. This mark is composed of an equilateral triangle with a single straight line coming off the center of the triangle- giving the appearance of an arrow or “Christmas tree”. This marking denotes that the barrel was shortened slightly from the threads and rechambered to correct the throat of the chamber by the arsenal. The SAKO factories<36s00> pressure mark is almost always found on rifles so marked as above to indicate that a pressure test was done after the barrel work was preformed."

Close Quote.

Therefore, (and please forgive my ignorance) when Mr. Thomas states: "re-chambered to correct the throat of the chamber" does that mean said rifles were chambered in a different caliber?
 

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Therefore, (and please forgive my ignorance) when Mr. Thomas states: "re-chambered to correct the throat of the chamber" does that mean said rifles were chambered in a different caliber?
It is a good question. The rifle is still 7.62x54R. What Vic meant was that the barrel was shortened after the chamber was cut, and before screwing the barrel into the receiver. As a result of this shortening, the chamber became too short for the cartridge, and the chamber had to be recut to the correct length.

Definitely take it out and shoot it, once you have cleaned it up. They are really fun to shoot, and some are surprisingly accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It’s been a hoot tracking down all the proofs and markings on this rifle, I really like a mystery, for instant the barrel was made in Germany with money raised by the Lotta Svard (but of course you guys already know this). The receiver tang has the Tula Hammer just above a date stamp of 916r, I think that means the receiver was made in 1916 or perhaps 1906 not sure on that?? The bolt’s cocking knob has the Izhevsk Bow and Arrow stamp. The stock has a circular stamp that’s too faint to read, the letter “M” or “W” is faintly hand carved on one side, the letter “J” stamped on the other side and the number “4” stamped on the fore stock. The fore stock is impressively zipper spliced together. The bolt and barrel have matching serial numbers; however, there are other numbers that are lined out, the Finns really did cobble these rifles together; they got their markka worth. There are a dozen more marks I haven’t identified yet.

After a good cleaning (relax, I only cleaned the cosmo off the metal bits and left the wood as is) I have decided not to shoot this rifle. The metal is solid but there is a crack in the butt stock and I am afraid that repetitive recoils will only exacerbate the crack. It’s a shame; I really wanted to see how accurate she is. I guess, I will repack it with cosmo and put it away, what a pity. As I sit here with a cold one I wonder about the events this old rifle witnessed, a lot of pain, unimaginable suffering and jubilation no doubt.
 
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