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Above average in my experience, though every one I've owned had a nice bore. Got 6 or 8 from the importer in the mid 90's for dirt cheap (some m/m bolts, rust or cracked stocks only one was as bad as some of the recent 7mm vz24 parts guns). Saved the best the rest sold very quick for around $150 each when I decided to thin the herd. Inflation and increased interest in milsrups have probably doubled the price since then and the fairly small number made was reduced by a Peruvian conversion program to 30/06. JL
 

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Good buy,Most that came in in the 1990s were worn with onlhy 10% blue,they were at least in orginal 7.65.I feel the orginal caliber is more desireable than the 30.06 conversions.Yours has a nice crest and blueing.Many Peruvians show much use or they are brand new like the 1909's but you will find a lot of them in well used condition.Remember it has the reveresed safety-and you can put the safety on and lock the bolt in with out it being cocked.Good find!!
 

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Diamond Member with Oak Leaves and Swords
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Hi David
Nice find! As a collector, I think of this rifle as one of a family of three very similar Peruvian rifles. The Czechoslovak-made Vz.32 (only made for Peru) is sort of the 'prototype" rifle on which the Model 1935 short rifle is based. There are too many similarities between the two not to come to that conlusion. And then there is the much rarer FN-made Model 1935 carbine with an 18 inch (approx) barrel made for mounted troops or police. Happy hunting! :)
Best Regards,
John
 

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I had a Vz-32,it was the small ring receiver with the large hump on the receiver bridge for the older stripper clip.Had the turned down bolt with the flattened knob,knurled.different type of front band not the H style -for use with the 1983/91 bayonet.There is one pictured in Olsens book-I ended up with the rifle pictured.The barrel was longer than the Vz-33 and I dont think the vz-32 had the lightening cuts prresent in the vz-33 or if it was just done on the G-33/40-I didnt mean to jump the gun on John,He will have a better answer.....and maybe a picture of one.....
 

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Diamond Member with Oak Leaves and Swords
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I had a Vz-32,it was the small ring receiver with the large hump on the receiver bridge for the older stripper clip.Had the turned down bolt with the flattened knob,knurled.different type of front band not the H style -for use with the 1983/91 bayonet.There is one pictured in Olsens book-I ended up with the rifle pictured.The barrel was longer than the Vz-33 and I dont think the vz-32 had the lightening cuts prresent in the vz-33 or if it was just done on the G-33/40-I didnt mean to jump the gun on John,He will have a better answer.....and maybe a picture of one.....

Hi Keith, I'm glad you responded. I missed this question completely! Sorry, Gil. I would agree with Keith's assessment. The two rifles have important basic similarlities, but differ in rear sight assemblies, barrel length, caliber and bayonet system dimensions. However, both are essentially lightened rifles using small ring standard-length actions and triggerguard assemblies, turned down bolts, prominent front sight guards and walniut stocks with full length handguards. These rifles and a third version made solely for Uruguay, make up their own family of lightened rifles, all of them fairly rare. The Peruvian vz.32 and Czechoslovak police vz.33 seldom appear these days, and the Uruguayan carbine, (with the exception of the one in the last Stern auction in 2009), never appears at all. The total production of all three is very small: 25,311 vz.33's, 5,000 vz.32's and 2,000 Uruguayan carbines, so any one of them is a collector's prize.

If I can locate them in the attic, I'll try and disassemble and photograph a vz.33 and a vz.32 side by side. Don't hold your breathe though. It's cold up there! :)
Regards
 

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Ed,Nice example!! Wish I would have kept mine.My interests changed and then changed back again.At the time I had a Vz-32 there was no internet.My friend Jan Gardiner sold it to me and explained to me what it was and that it was rare.I even had an extra Vz-32 stock he threw in on the deal.I had the typical pitting along woodline,missmatched bolt but the right one.I got pulled back in to contract mausers when I became more involved in internet forums.Jeesh I also had the Guatemalan Vz-24 pictured in Balls Mauser book and ended up selling that too.Couldnt keep everything,its the same old story of selling one to buy another or different rifle.
 

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Thank you for the kind words. Many years back when I was young and foollish I sold off most of my collection. It has taken me 30 years+ to rebuild my collection. I always keep that in the back of my head. I rarely get rid of anything. Praise God I have not had the need too. Ed
 

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Thanks for the information folks. Behtonfarer----the sad statement you make is you "had" an extra vz-32 stock. Like mauser dad, and seldom seen, the Bohemian I bought one of the busted at the wrist half stock vz-32's that Dennis Kroh had a few years back. To date I have had no luck in finding a replacement stock. Mauser dad managed to get one right off of this forum which is amazing or in his case, he would say Providental help. I have never handled a vz-33, and foolishly ignored the Bohmians advice to buy one on gunbrokers that went unbid on for $340.00 back in 2001. It was Christmas and I was traveling.
I assumed that the 32 is a "lightened" carbine and will put it in a vz-24 stock very soon, until I get lucky.
thanks again
gil
 

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Gil,I was thinking about you when he said he had an extra stock. There has to be one out there with your name on it. Ed
 

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Lokk on the Internet for comparable sporterized Mausers at auction.

Cleidus88, The best way to get a perspective is to search one of the larger auction sites for "Mauser sporter" or such. This will turn up quite a few former military rifles which were modified by "gunsmiths" of varying skill levels years ago when this was common practice. The sad truth is that many rifles that otherwise now would be valuable historical collectibles (IF THEY WERE STILL IN ORIGINAL CONFIGURATION) are now offered in the $200. to $400 range as used sporting rifles. Personally, I really appreciate the Model 98 Mauser action design as the basis for a hunting rifle but the bottom line price for these sporterized rifles is set by common comparably useful, USED, commercial rifles; and they are really low valued if not set up correctly for scope use. Your rifle looks like the conversion was of good workmanship and the original Peruvian 1935 was high quality, but that is the reality of sporterized military rifles at this point in time. Larry.
 

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Not only did FN copy the VZ32 with the FN35 rifle but they also copied the Czech bayonet.
 

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Thats a purdy one and not in bad condition as i see so many of the SA mausers that are ridden hard and put away wet.

Thanks guys your edging me on now with all the purdy pics of mausers. I just added more mausers to my want list. When i first started collecting about 15 or so years ago i wanted to collect every mauser. When i found out there were about 1,000 different mausers I figured I couldn't do it so my collection went in different directions. But now its rounded out so i'm full circle back to looking for mausers again. Since i can't take my $$ with me when i pass on i'm spending it now while i'm retired.....broke but happy......
 
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