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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need help learning more about this M1903 that showed up at my dealer's shop. What is the value on it? It's in rough condition, has the flaming bomb on the barrel. They've gotten low ball offers of $200 up to $600 but the cosigner wants $1,200, which seems high for such a rough gun.
 

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You have an early receiver number Springfield, which is not generally considered as safe to shoot. Finish looks original, and many parts look correct. We would need more pictures of the full length on each side, any stock cartouches on the left side, nose, and underneath. Any markings stamped on the bolt.

It looks like it has a front crossbolt, and I'm not sure that is correct for a 1915?

Regardless, it will probably sit for a long time on consignment at $1,200, and mostly because it is a low number receiver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You have an early receiver number Springfield, which is not generally considered as safe to shoot. Finish looks original, and many parts look correct. We would need more pictures of the full length on each side, any stock cartouches on the left side, nose, and underneath. Any markings stamped on the bolt.

It looks like it has a front crossbolt, and I'm not sure that is correct for a 1915?

Regardless, it will probably sit for a long time on consignment at $1,200, and mostly because it is a low number receiver.
I'll get more pictures up later this week when I go back to the shop. There are cartouches on the stock but its very faint of some letters.

What would the general value be on one of this given whats known about it?
 

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For God sakes wipe the thing down with some oil!!!!!!!!!!! Put a patch down the bore!

Doesn't look like its seen any love in the last 10 years from the someone who values it at $1200!
 

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I'll get more pictures up later this week when I go back to the shop. There are cartouches on the stock but its very faint of some letters.

What would the general value be on one of this given whats known about it?

Something that should be considered by the shop owner - placing a warning tag on the gun, so that prospective buyers would be aware that it is deemed unsafe to shoot. Then the public would be able to judge for themselves how much they value the difference between a safe queen/wall hanger and a potential range gun.

Some low number guns are very collectible, just the same, whether they can be safely fired or not. These are generally very early production with all original features. But a 1915 is not generally in the range of interest as say, a 1905.

I agree with others. It isn't in horrible condition, but it needs some oil and a wipe down. It's not a $1,200 gun. It sounds like the customers have already given you a good value range. And the $600 offer might be generous, unless it is real right on original parts. And again, it will always be a low number receiver, and should be represented as such.
 

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Even if that rifle has all-original parts, I figure $1200 for a rifle IN THAT CONDITION is reaching more than just a little bit.

Give it another 50-100 years, and I MIGHT consider its current condition to be 'age-appropriate'. Currently, the term I would use is 'neglected'.

You need to do something about the rust, and soon, or it is just going to continue to deteriorate.
 

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If that has an original barrel and a one-bolt stock, SEND ME the shop's phone number!! I'd risk catching my pants on fire from the speed of getting my wallet out.

I agree, additional pictures are needed, though.
The 1915 date can be seen on the barrel. But I think I see the front stock crossbolt. 'Tis interesting, but I'm hoping not to need the fire extinguisher for you, Rick!
 

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Would gladly pay $1200 for an original WWI rifle in decent shape - myself.

Always amazes me that people don't clean firearms before trying to sell them. You wash your car before you try to sell it. You clean your house too.

Will be interesting to see what this rifle is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Pardon the late reply, wasn't able to get photos until much later this week. Here are the pics of the barrel, bolt and the faint marks on the stock.

The mark on the stock is a square with the letters "SA" on top of the letters "SPG".

I'll try to get full length pics of the side soon.
 

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The stock dates from at least the late 1930's, which is about twenty years too late to be a one-bolt stock. Also, I can't tell from the pix if the stock configuration is a "C" or an "S." IMHO, The wood would be the deal maker. Otherwise, it's a parts gun worth the value of its components.
 

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An SA cartouched rebuild would usually show signs of the previous cartouche, if only a shadow unless the stock had been completely refinished and this would be apparent by the sharpness of the grasping groove edges. Also, there would be a second firing proof beneath the wrist. The letter in the feed lever recess was not changed in either case and this would be a clue to the actual vintage of the stock in the case of a rebuild if it were of earlier issue. Pix here, do not provide this information.
 
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