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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went out to the desert today to relax and enjoy some of my firearms. I took 2 M1 carbines with me. One has a type 1 peep sight and the other has an adjustable sight. I was shooting the one with the adjustable sight and noticed my shots suddenly and progressively starting hitting farther and farther right. When I finally looked at the rear sight I noticed the entire sight was sliding off the rifle to the right side. It slid about half way off. I tried gently but firmly pushing it back but it didn't budge. I then pushed it harder but it still didn't budge. I didn't want to break anything so I stopped. Does anyone know why it started sliding off to the right and how to put it back into the proper position? Thanks.
 

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The rear sight is slightly loose in the dovetail. Recoil can dislodge it.

I have a friend that had much the same problem (loose on the dovetail) with the front sight of his M1 Rifle, but he didn't 'catch on' to the cause until the sight actually fell off the rifle.

You need to drift the sight back into position with a small hammer and a brass drift. Then 'restake' the rear sight base to the receiver.

There should be a pretty heavy 'divot' in the metal shared by the rear sight base and the receiver that should line up pretty closely when the sight is drifted into the right place.

Use a centerpunch to do the restaking. Don't be afraid to use a bit of 'energy' when doing the restaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rear sight is slightly loose in the dovetail. Recoil can dislodge it.

I have a friend that had much the same problem (loose on the dovetail) with the front sight of his M1 Rifle, but he didn't 'catch on' to the cause until the sight actually fell off the rifle.

You need to drift the sight back into position with a small hammer and a brass drift. Then 'restake' the rear sight base to the receiver.

There should be a pretty heavy 'divot' in the metal shared by the rear sight base and the receiver that should line up pretty closely when the sight is drifted into the right place.

Use a centerpunch to do the restaking. Don't be afraid to use a bit of 'energy' when doing the restaking.
Thanks! Shoot, the work sounds like something I may not wanna try myself, though it does sound fairly easy and straight forward. I have no idea what a brass drift is, though. While I can build an AR from scratch, I have zero experience working on these rifles. I wouldn't want to screw it up. My dad passed it on to me and it's in pretty excellent condition. I'd hate to damage it or make a crappy repair. Any idea who could do something like this? I live in L.A. Thanks again!
 

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A brass drift is also known in some circles as a pin punch.

The reason you want one made of brass is because a steel one would mar the finish on the sight. The brass (if any) from the punch that is left behind usually rubs right off.

The job isn't really all that difficult.
 

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The dovetail slot opening is wider on the right and tapers to the narrower opening on the left. That is why a loose rear sight will always drift out to the right.

The procedure which Ronbo describes is not difficult, but it does require precision. It is important that the rear sight base is properly positioned before applying the center punch to restake it in place.

Here is an image of a stake mark. Drift your windage adjustment all the way to one side by turning the knob. Count the clicks as you turn, and then reverse direction for the same number of clicks to return windage to center.

 

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Just went through this with one of my carbines. I used a thin nail set to re-stake the base into the dovetail. I'd recommend not trying to peen the dovetail itself, as it's quite a bit harder than the sight base. Try to deform the base into the divot already created by the original staking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gotcha! Seems easier now with further explanation. A pin punch is the name I know. The drift thing threw me off. Thanks, you guys. The picture helps a lot too.

I've attached some photos showing the sight. I really can't see much of a stake job, aside from the small marks on the left side, but they really don't appear to even affect the sight base but rather just the dovetail. I also attached a photo of both carbines we took to the desert yesterday. My dad kept all his guns well maintained and in excellent condition, as I'm sure you can tell in the photo.

I may as well ask another question while I'm here. Can you tell me the difference between the 2 apertures on the flip type rear sights? I don't see a size difference between the two holes. My buddy and I both looked hard at them yesterday and couldn't see a difference so I set it with the "L" facing forward. It seemed to work well to 200 yards.

Thanks again.

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That looks like it was lightly staked from the beginning.

If you don't have a brass drift punch, you can try a piece of hardwood and a small hammer with light taps. You should be able to move it. Looks like it needs to go about 1/4 inch.

It sounds like you have a good concept on how to retain it, after it has been positioned correctly. Good luck!
 

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The L rear sight has the apertures set at different heights to allow some adjustment between 'short' and 'long' range shooting.

I have never owned a Carbine with the two position rear sight (but I HAVE handled a few a LONG time ago) so I might be wrong about this, but it is my impression that the 'short' range adjustment is when the 'unused' aperture on the sight is sitting level forward of the pivot point on the sight.

You can tell for sure by drawing a bead on something in the distance, and while not moving your head, take note of what happens to the sight picture when the 'other' aperture gets flipped into position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The L rear sight has the apertures set at different heights to allow some adjustment between 'short' and 'long' range shooting.

I have never owned a Carbine with the two position rear sight (but I HAVE handled a few a LONG time ago) so I might be wrong about this, but it is my impression that the 'short' range adjustment is when the 'unused' aperture on the sight is sitting level forward of the pivot point on the sight.

You can tell for sure by drawing a bead on something in the distance, and while not moving your head, take note of what happens to the sight picture when the 'other' aperture gets flipped into position.
Aahhhh! I will try that next time. Thanks!
 

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I owned a A/O repro years ago with the flip sight. The adjustable rear sight is a 100% improvement if you plan on shooting a Carbine on a regular basis.
 

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The flip type Carbine sight short leg is for 100 yards, the long leg is for 300 yards.

The original Ordnance method of securing both the types of rear sights was staking them in place.
The proper place to stake is on the FRONT of the dovetail, not the rear.
This way the adjustable sight will cover the staking mark.

If you crank the rear sight windage over you'll see a small notch on the front sides of the receiver dovetail where it was to be staked.

To stake the rear sight the idea is to move a little metal to secure the sight...... NOT to put a punch mark in.
For that reason the correct staking punch is a center punch with a ROUNDED end. This will move some metal, not just make a crater.
This is shown in the USGI Ordnance Field Manual for the Carbine.
The manual can be had here..........
NOTE the info at the page top on what user name and password to use to get in............


Due to the value of Carbines today, a preferred method is to use Loctite to secure the sight.
This prevents the risk of the hard receiver chipping or cracking, and is a permanent solution.
Use a dropper to put drops of Acetone or lacquer thinner into the receiver dovetail to force grease and oil out.
Give it a few good shots to dissolve the years of dried gunk out.

After drying the solvent out with a hair dryer to warm the metal, inject a good drop of Loctite into the dovetail.
You can use Loctite Blue, or for a more secure job, Loctite Red.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The flip type Carbine sight short leg is for 100 yards, the long leg is for 300 yards.

The original Ordnance method of securing both the types of rear sights was staking them in place.
The proper place to stake is on the FRONT of the dovetail, not the rear.
This way the adjustable sight will cover the staking mark.

If you crank the rear sight windage over you'll see a small notch on the front sides of the receiver dovetail where it was to be staked.

To stake the rear sight the idea is to move a little metal to secure the sight...... NOT to put a punch mark in.
For that reason the correct staking punch is a center punch with a ROUNDED end. This will move some metal, not just make a crater.
This is shown in the USGI Ordnance Field Manual for the Carbine.
The manual can be had here..........
NOTE the info at the page top on what user name and password to use to get in............


Due to the value of Carbines today, a preferred method is to use Loctite to secure the sight.
This prevents the risk of the hard receiver chipping or cracking, and is a permanent solution.
Use a dropper to put drops of Acetone or lacquer thinner into the receiver dovetail to force grease and oil out.
Give it a few good shots to dissolve the years of dried gunk out.

After drying the solvent out with a hair dryer to warm the metal, inject a good drop of Loctite into the dovetail.
You can use Loctite Blue, or for a more secure job, Loctite Red.
Excellent!!! Thank you! I'd much rather use loctite.
 
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