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Discussion Starter #1
I have a carbine, and I know that rifle front and back. I've got every feel down and I know every sound it makes. The one thing I don't know (believe it or not) is how to uncock it. It's so simple with a bolt action but I have no idea how to do this on a semi automatic. Dry firing it would work but it's hard on the firing pin (or is it...?) and dismantling it to uncock it would be a waste since as soon as I put it back together, I would check the chamber (as habit) causing it to cock again. Anyone got any advice to uncock a semi-automatic rifle? Thanks in advance.
 

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Pull the bolt back and slowly ease it forward...pulling the trigger repeatedly as you go. At some point the hammer will come up before the bolt locks up. I haven't tried it on carbine but it works with the Garand.

 
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I just use snap caps in my semi-autos, that way I don't have to worry about it. I've got'em for the m1 carbine, garand,G43, sks,and rasheed.
I don't need them for my Hakim or Ljungamn because I can de-cock the hammer manually with these by locking the action cover forward and releasing the hammer holding it with my fingers to let down slowly.
 

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Dry firing to "un-cock" the action won't hurt the M1 Carbine. They were designed for that.

The CMP Rifle Safety Manual even says so, see page 12:

http://www.odcmp.com/Coaching/CMPSafetyManualBook.pdf

I even read an analysis that said the slow bolt release with trigger pull could potentially cause more damage because in normal firing the hammer is thrown further back and doesn't drag on the bolt like in the slow release.

Good luck,
Cass
 

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American semi autos are designed to be dry fired, as it's a method of teaching basic rifle skills. Your carbine has probably been dry fired hundreds of times.
 

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M1 carbine question.

If dry firing was harmful to the M1 carbine, it would have been designed to lock the bolt in the rearward position when the last round in the magazine is fired. This certainly would prevent dry firing.
 

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I dislike dry firing any gun. I believe that these M1 carbines were dry fired a lot during training but we aren't in the army now, at least I don't anymore.
When my Garand or M1 carbine is cocked I just release the hammer (by squeezing the trigger) at the moment I feel that the operation rod has pushed the bolt against the hammer.
Try it, cock the rifle, let the operation rod go slowly forwards all the way, pull the operation rod gently back to the rear and you'll feel when the bolt touches the hammer: this is the moment to squeeze the trigger and let the operation rod go forward gently (because the hand that still holds the operation rod prevents it to slam home). You may believe it or not but that's what I was been told in the late fifthies!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Dry firing to "un-cock" the action won't hurt the M1 Carbine. They were designed for that.

The CMP Rifle Safety Manual even says so, see page 12:

http://www.odcmp.com/Coaching/CMPSafetyManualBook.pdf

I even read an analysis that said the slow bolt release with trigger pull could potentially cause more damage because in normal firing the hammer is thrown further back and doesn't drag on the bolt like in the slow release.

Good luck,
Cass
Okay. Thanks! And thanks to everyone else that answered my question. I didn't know that American rifles were made to do this for training purposes. Thanks again!
 
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