Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

I wanted to throw this up so see what you all think. Posted a thread when I first bought this a couple years back. I initially just wanted to replace the bolt but then started to look into replacing most major components which got increasingly frustrating. I know I'm not fooling anyone that you will be able to tell it's a "put-together" but I if you see what I started out with and what it looks like now. Doesn't look half bad. Tried to breath new life into it. It's my first major overhaul. I don't know if I'll attempt another one. But wanted to see what I was able to do.

Let me know what you think.

The first few shots were what I had to start with. Essentially a "complete" M1 Carbine that had no correct parts. The barrel was import marked. The stock was a late war low wood (covered with like a polyurethane), the Bolt was an early flat Winchester (in the white). But it was an early IBM A.O. stamped receiver which is one of the rarer marked M1s. And it was "cheap" relatively so I thought I'd take a chance.






The reason a couple shots are doubles. I'm no photographer so I wanted to take a couple in different lighting to try and show the color of the wood best I could.

Next several shots are what I ended up with. Most major parts have been corrected. Found a Highwood early IBM stock (it has been cleaned with Homer Fromby's Furnature refinisher then some boiled linseed oil BUT NOT sanded which is key). I found a nice IBM barrel, the rear sight is correct flip type IBM rear sight. The trigger assembly is Inland but 90% of the IBMs I have found all had Inland trigger groups so that might actually be the original. It has the correct push type safety. The hand guard is actually not even the hand guard that came with the stock but I think it matches perfectly, I found the hand guard about 4-5 months ago and got lucky that it matched. My IBM flat bolt just came in and it looks to match almost perfectly. Slightly off but really tough to tell.

First project I've "finished" and I don't know if I'll invest anymore into it. But pretty happy with how it turned out. Considering what I started with. Not sure if the buttplate is IBM, probably not but it's close. They didn't mark their buttplates you have count the rows and match them up by style.

Pretty happy with it but it was a frustrating project. Just because early parts are so hard to come by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·


I also really liked the receiver because it has a "L" in the serial number. A local gunshop owner who has about 75 various M1 carbines in his collection told me that probably a number "1" stamp broke and before they could replace it instead of stopping production they just used a letter "L" in the mean time. Don't think it hurts or helps the value but kinda neat story behind it. I'm not sure if that's true or not though.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
127 Posts
Nice job, including not sanding the wood. I qualified with an M1 in Air Force basic, 1955. It wasn't in anywhere near as good shape as yours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, to me it looks nice but I'm wondering if it was worth the effort if some of the experts on can tell it's an obvious restoration and I really didn't improve the value. Not sure if I'll sell it but more for peace of mine knowing I didn't throw money away on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,634 Posts
An expert can and will tell if its been restored. A newbie - not so much.

I am from the school of thought of - if it left the United States Arsenals in such and such a condition; with these upgrades and parts - its the way it should remain.

Example, i have an early Inland that is all period correct minus an updated magazine button. I am going to leave it as it is.. it is what it is and its how it left the arsenal - so it will remain. Not to mention its a family heirloom.

I do understand the temptation and appeal to make something correct; even though i do not agree with it in principle. You probably will never get your money that you put forth into it back; but if you are happy that's what matters. Just hope you don't try to pass it off as it being all original, but instead a restore; if you ever sell it. Passing it off as an original (which i do not believe you are doing based on your thread title) is something that i do not condone, and IMO very dishonest. Its also known as humping; a practice that is plaguing American military collecting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nah not looking to sell it off as original. Just trying to restore to the way it should look. It was an import so between that and its original conditon, you can't drag down its value much more than that. Since it was a hard to find receiver I was hoping to "save" it and breath some life back into it.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
127 Posts
Thanks, to me it looks nice but I'm wondering if it was worth the effort if some of the experts on can tell it's an obvious restoration and I really didn't improve the value. Not sure if I'll sell it but more for peace of mine knowing I didn't throw money away on it.
Hey, I've not contracted collectoritis, so the notion of making it a shooter doesn't make me ill. The right reloads make it a good varmint gun, even an adequate up-close deer gun. I took my first deer with a .32-20 80 grain - the carbine cartridge is superior to that. The peep sight will work fine, dunno about the front sight.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top