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The Finn’s didn’t care about matching numbers.They usually stamped the bolt head with the last four of the barrel serial number and called it good.Some are stamped on the bolt flat like in the auction,but those numers look too small to be original.I’m pretty sure it’s been renumbered stateside.
 

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Matching as in factory matching? No, it's been reworked at some point.

It would have left the factory with the buttplate numbered with the same last two digits as the barrel, and the last two of the rifle serial on the ball of the bolt knob, and possibly with the civil guard number (rather than the rifle serial) in the "normal" place on the bolt.

Plus, of course the stock has been changed.
 

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mike 76: none of my Finn mosin variants have last 4 digits on bolt head? Have not seen that before

Interesting....auction title clearly states matching but stock is obviously not...

Nice rifle though
 

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mike 76: none of my Finn mosin variants have last 4 digits on bolt head? Have not seen that before

Interesting....auction title clearly states matching but stock is obviously not...

Nice rifle though
I'm guessing he meant to say on the ball of the bolt handle. It's pretty common to see the last 2 or last 4 numbers of serial stamped there on Finnish/Finned rifles. M28s and M28/30s are frequently seen with bolts that were originally numbered on the ball with the last two, and with two more digits added to make it last 4 when the Finnish army took over possession of the rifles.

This rifle would be considered "Finn matching" I suppose, as it's been reworked. But it would have left the factory with the buttplate and bolt matched.
 

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The Finn’s didn’t care about matching numbers.They usually stamped the bolt head with the last four of the barrel serial number and called it good.
According to the Civil Guard contracts with SAKO:
  • Fully original 1931 contract m/28 would full serial number on the chamber, last two numbers on the ball of the bolt handle and buttplate.
  • Fully original 1933 contract m/28-30 would full serial number on the chamber, last two numbers on the ball of the bolt handle and buttplate.
  • Fully original 1936 contract m/28-30 would have full serial number on the chamber, last four numbers on the ball of the bolt handle and buttplate.
  • Fully original 1940 contract m/39 would have full serial number on the chamber, last four numbers on the ball of the bolt handle and bottom of the magazine.
 

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From what I’ve read, Finn mosins didn’t always come out of Sako fully matched. There’s a lot of examples shown on an ongoing thread with 91 stocks and different manners of construction. While it‘s nice I suppose to get the tiger striped - all matching - number on the buttplate of Civil Guard member, good luck finding one now. I’m sure someone here will show theirs, along with the ridiculous price tag of $229, which of course they bought it 20 years ago or so. These examples are going for $2k or more, unless they win the “I got it in a pawn shop! $300! Can you believe it!” gun lottery.

there were 22,000 or so still in Finn inventory in 1950 something, of course many were also probably hanging on Finn living room walls.

However I’m curious as to why my 1935 28/30 has heavy bluing, absolutely mint bore, 91 stock. I understand they had a small run of 28/30’s made for officer training in 1939-40?
 

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there were 22,000 or so still in Finn inventory in 1950 something, of course many were also probably hanging on Finn living room walls.

However I’m curious as to why my 1935 28/30 has heavy bluing, absolutely mint bore, 91 stock. I understand they had a small run of 28/30’s made for officer training in 1939-40?
The 22,000 number is from 1951 and the actual number of surviving M28/30's outside of Finland is likely far less today. These rifles saw continuing service as reserve and training rifles until the mid 1980's so some were likely scrapped due to damage or converted into M28/57 and M28/76 target rifles during this time. In addition 1300 were sold off to Finnish civilians in 1986 and a unknown number were donated to the reestablished Estonian National Guard in the early 90's. Looking over the pictures of your rifle from the ad on the Trader forum it shows all the signs of a rifle refurbished post war, placed in storage and then never used again until it was sold as surplus. You see this with all models of Finnish Mosin, some look new and unissued while others show fair to serious wear. On a related note, the sling in the ad pictures looks to be a Polish Mosin sling, not really correct for a M28/30(assuming it came with the rifle) but a difficult sling to find. It took me over two years to find one for my Polish M44.
 

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Thank you for that, SSG!
looks like I need to pick up slings for both the 28/39 and “battlefield” veteran 1943 M39 I also recently got. I’m getting the round buckle variety, but apparently there’s two types, and I have no idea which ones to get.

But the 28/30, how did it get a mint 1935 barrel? Yes, obviously a refurb. But the barrel intrigues me.

Did I pay a lot? Yep. But in my observations the price never goes down again.

Next I would like a 1943/44 Garand (my dad served in New Guinea those years). And a Persian Mauser perhaps. But the price for admission ... dang, I waited too long.
 
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