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$1400 to $1500 - bloodstain is sometimes the cause, but most of the time its not, unless you have a direct statement from the vet who acquired it.
So, unless its documented, it could just be something caustic that took the bluing off.
 

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Anytime anyone dropped some cleaning solvent/gas/something else that ate away at the bluing, it often becomes "blood pitting" or "blood damage" to make up for the cosmetic issue. Like Edward said, it does not add any value unless the person who brought it back signs something saying as much. I think his price estimate is spot on.
 

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I have a Luger that has pitting scattered sort of randomly on both sides. I had no idea what it was until someone more knowledgeable than I said it was a great example of blood pitting. I researched it and found that blood is acidic and can easily cause pitting if left on for weeks or months. It doesn't cause just finish loss. Actual pitting is most common. Usually some random pattern. Fascinating subject. There are many indications that pitting is highly likely to be from blood but, as the posts above state, it can be caused from other sources. Documentation of how it happened or how the pistol was acquired is needed. I don't have either with mine but I'm convinced what I have is authentic.
 

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My question is, why does the matching sideplate look like it’s only got light holster wear to the raised portion (pretty much a given on every Luger) but the finish is completely stripped off the next adjoining panel, to the edge. Almost like the gun was taken down for cleaning and something caustic was spilled on it, while the sideplate was missing. I’m no archaeologist, but to my mind a damaged finish and suspicious story don’t make for a $1700 gun. Matching helps but finish damage is finish damage. His price isn’t crazy high, but it is high. Of course, finding a matching gun that the seller isn’t asking $2500 for? “Don’t you know how rare these are???” Might be hard in todays market.
 

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Here are some pictures of the blood pitting on my Luger.
That's beautiful. Sad and sobering in reality. But still beautiful.
 

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That's the scenario that I was told was most likely. Pickup up off a dead German, wet or dried blood still on it, and tossed in a knapsack and not cleaned still for weeks or months. No holster to protect the gun in action when the soldier was shot down. Morose but very realistic in war.
 

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Tell yourself what ever story you want to make you feel better about owning it but at the end of the day it's still a damaged firearm. I've seen damage like this caused by hurricane storm waters and the owner too busy to look at it until weeks later. I've also seen damage like this on firearms from leaking water heaters. They kept them under the bed on a carpeted floor and had not thought about them until weeks after the repair to the heater. I could go on but I think you get my point. Even a soldier "robbing the dead" would think twice about picking up a bloody weapon as a souvenir.
Dan
 

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I have a hard shell P. 38 holster dated 1942 with what appears to be streaks of blood stains on the back side. I've thought about taking it to a lab somewhere and having a few samples of the stains analyzed to determine just what they are. If the analyzes comes back as blood stains, I'll post pics of the holster with pics of the lab report here.
 

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For illustration are attached some pictures of a K98k rifle coded "bnz 43" with single rune on the receiver and blood stains on the outside of the stock. This rifle is unique, since the dried up blood is still attached to metal and wooden parts of it on the inside which I therefore didn't even dare to remove.

Notice how the blood on the outside made stains in the wood and rust pittings on the rear barrel band. The second picture shows how the blood got inside the stock too, and how it crystallized on the barrel. You can also see the traces of where it left rust stains on the barrel and how those look like.

Wood Musical instrument Natural material Rectangle Metal
Brown Furniture Table Natural material Wood
 
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