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That just gotta be an Elm stock.... Neat piece!
 

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Now that is about the most radical pattern I have seen in ELM !!!!!!!!!! Since it is matching , it would be a replacement stock .

You would not likely have an ELM stock on a 1922 dated M96 . More than likely beech ? Does the stock match the receiver serial number ?
 

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Now that is about the most radical pattern I have seen in ELM !!!!!!!!!! Since it is matching , it would be a replacement stock .

You would not likely have an ELM stock on a 1922 dated M96 . More than likely beech ? Does the stock match the receiver serial number ?
That could vey well be beech. I have seen and owned some highly figured, beautiful beech stocks.
 

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cruffel : Yes , you are correct . It could easily be a beech stock on the 1911 M96 ? Need some really close up photos of the grain . The dark grain on ELM stocks has large pores in it compared to the light colored areas .
 

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I agree it ~appears~ to be elm from the photo... but elm was not used in 1911. We've seen ZERO m/96 with elm in 1911. They just don't occur as OEM in 1911.

And I'll agree with Swede that it probably is beech... in a fairly unusual grain pattern. We do need to see close ups of the stock in several places, por favor.

Does the figuring occur on both sides of the stock?

Even as beech it would be worth a premium due to the unusual grade of beech, IMO.

Dutch
 

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The fact that the stock doesn't match the rest of the gun is problematical, and if Dutchman says no 1911s in the data base are elm, well, you can probably take that to the bank. Nevertheless, whatever it is, that is one crazy, zorching stock, and would rate near top of the list compared to any of mine, or others for that matter. I love this forum!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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ELM was only used from 1915 to 1918 . Any rifle from 1898 to 1914 could possibly have a replacement ELM stock , matched to the receiver . Same applies to carbines , 1895 to 1914 .

Likewise , any rifle or carbine dated 1919 or later would not likely have a matching ELM stock . Possibly a mismatched or forced matched ELM stock .

It is possible a few ELM stocks were left in stock 1915/1918 and numbered & assembled in a later year . We have not seen an example like this to date .
 

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Simonovsdog, that is an outstanding stock!! I vote for beech. Beech often is regarded somewhat dull in its apperiance but a stock cut this way with such a wild piece of stock makes it totally extraordinary!!
Congrats to a marvelous m/96.
Regards,
ARILAR:)
 

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This stock is such a nice pattern and it prompted me to do a little internet searching on beech grain. As others have stated, beech is normally somewhat understated but I found the photo below and I could see how, if sawed in a certain way, a beech stock could be quite figured.

 
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