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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Salt and SUGAR, we done salt to death, but what about sugar?

Sugar, like salt, has basically an infinite shelf life , good forever and fairly easy to meet storage requirements.

mylar bag or homer bucket cool dry spot

sugar is used to preserve fruit like salt is used to preserve meat, in fact we often call preserved fruit in the form of jellies and jams preserves

you are probably not going to stop picking and preserving fruit after SHTF certain;y some one some where will want to do that which means if you don't can fruits yourself you have some good trading material if you have sugar to spare

sugar like salt is hard to come by in the environment unless for salt you live near the ocean .. honey is limited resource not a whole lot relative speaking to a hive and how many hives might be in your area
Bee Lining: The Oldtimers’ Way to Find Wild Beehives | Articles | Features (northernwoodlands.org)

What is bee lining? | How to find feral bee colonies (uaex.edu)

so the solution, I would think, is a couple 5 gallon buckets of sugar different sugars from different plants ... one important one you can grow and make a sweetener out of is barley by making malt from it as in home brew beer ( just don't make the beer and put it on your pancakes instead ) beets ( somehow??) sorghum syrups fruit juice's ect

so think about stockpiling good ol' white sugar
 

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Honey: (real honey)
as an antibacterial agent:

as a preservative:

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
For many years I've used honey, particularly Manuka, to treat open wounds.
yep honey is good for that, and I hear Manuka is expensive and prone to being faked Avoid These 'Fake' Manuka Honey Brands | Manuka Me Better .. so maybe save it for the first aid and other miracles and stockpile plain ol' white sugar for food preservation. also keep in mind with honey , you should't use in on children under 1 year old

Seems to me Honey wouldn't be the first choice for making mint jelly or most other preserves

When can my baby eat honey? | BabyCenter

Although honey seems like a wholesome and natural food to give your infant, don't do it until after she's at least 12 months old. Honey can contain spores of a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum, which can germinate in a baby's immature digestive system and cause infant botulism, a rare but potentially fatal illness.
These spores are usually harmless to adults and children over 1 year old, because the microorganisms normally found in the intestine keep the bacteria from growing.
To be on the safe side, don't cook with honey (in baked bread or pudding, for example) if your baby is going to be eating the finished dish. While the toxin is heat sensitive, the spores are difficult to kill. Commercial foods that contain honey, like ready-to-eat breakfast cereals and baby food, are safe for your baby because they've been heated enough to kill the spores.
 

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Alcohol.
That stuff will preserve fruits in jars, has antiseptic and blood pressure related medicinal quality.

Where I live , we can freeze things like meat "Fresh" and store them in under ground chambers in the permafrost.

Oh, ya, Oils too. We save 1/2 dried seal meats and boiled bird eggs in the shell, in buckets of rendered Seal oil. We keep them in the ground as well, atop the layer of permafrost under the soil untill freeze up , and then they are frozen untill consumed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Vinegar and Alcohol also have a place in the cabinet .
yeah... sort of ... you can make both vinegar and alcohol if you have fruit that needs to be preserved .. it's simple fermentation .. and in some cases the optimum yeast to promote the making of alcohol and vinegar out of whatever you have.. then you can turn around and preserve things with it.... but is see that as sort of/ kind of/ maybe a different thing... excellent point about it being a preservative.. but something you can make, as opposed to something you can make as needed and don't have to specifically stockpile like sugar or salt

some may live where sugar cane grows, or molasses from sorghum, never tried making molasses IIRC simpler then making it from sugar cane but as a rule sugar and salt is something that without specifically storing in quantity and taking in to account their shelf life is something you can store and use as a trade good instead of having to trade for it , because it is somethin everybody is really going to need, for all sorts of reasons.

there are tools involved if you are serious about alcohol and vinegar bubblers and that stuff , but also fruit presses if any quantity production is anticipated

vegetable/ nut oils are another thing that doesn't store well and can be made .. different topic and a definite problem if you are talking more than a year of so for storage
 

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Scuppernong or Muscadine wine is easy to make , may not be as good without the sugar added . I would think vinegar could be made using either , never had a batch of wine turn out bad , but have heard of others having it turn out like vinegar . It was easy to transport corn from mountain farms if it was turned into shine , worth more as well , and people have been storing other grain items the same way though out history . Calories in a bottle , jug , or barrel keep for years , and are always good in hard times . I use a 5 gallon glass water bottle to make wine in , it could be done in 1 gallon bottles if you were in a tight , alcohol content might be lower .
 

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We salt fish, mostly Salmon, slab bacon bought in bulk from Anachorage and Caribou/Moose we catch.

Get a bucket, a lid , 20 lbs salt and slice up the fish after cleaning them into one inch thick slabs, and cube up the meats 4x4x2inches thick, place on salt, and pack/pour salt inbetween. when done pack with salt and drop the bucket a few times s few inches to get the stuff settled.
It will pull the water out of the meats and make a sort of slurry and kill bacteria forever. stoe in a cool place and it will last for years.
Later, the majority of the salt can be recovered for use.

You place it in water and change the water every day for 4 days to get the salt back out and make the fish/meats edible.

You can also dry biscuits, crackers and bread slices or crisp flats and place them in a sealing lid bucket with a bag of salt to keep em dry in there forever
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Unless your long-term survival plans include a dentist, you might consider curbing your sugar use.
Nothing special about sugar ( or honey) when it comes to cavities , a carbohydrate is a carbohydrate is a carbohydrate

and we are talking about sugar as a preservative for fruits and a few other things ( also important in making alcohol and vinegar) the loss of the nutrients from not eating a varied diet of fruits and vegetables as well as meats and fats (oils) is far worse ... just brush your teeth , especially after grains , just as much a carb as sugar


it's ironic, the evil of sugar or corn syrup is that they have no nutrient value , no vitamins or fiber or minerals , just calories ..BUT if you use sugar as a preservative for fruits .. you get vitamins and minerals you wouldn't have otherwise

in a survival situation where starvation is a possibility, every calorie counts , even if it doesn't come with a vitamin. I can just hear a starving Russian in Leningrad saying don't eat that candy .. the dentist died from starvation last night so you have to watch how much sugar you eat from now on.

this brings up and important fact store bought processed food is "enriched" with vitamins to stave off about 10 fatal or depilating diseases that are caused by malnutrition vit C the B's are the most important , but Table salt has added iodine to prevent thyroid problems like goiter .

For preservation purposes you want salt WITHOUT iodine .. for table use or cooking you want salt WITH Iodine

another hard one vitamin D , a shortage of which cause rickets , malabsorption of calcium and will destroy your immune system is usually added to milk .. if you do not have a supply of store bought milk , even if you have a cow cow milk doesn't have vitamin D .

Fortunately humans can produce vitamin D IF and only if the expose most of their body to sunlight everyday... so if you don't have access to any other source of vitamin D you got to go back to the old fashion practice of taking a sun bath abot an hour if you expose arms legs and torso on one side ( especially in winter when folks are typically bundled in clothes or stay inside .)

this is why folks used to make a "Spring Tonic" out of stuff like dandelions ( first potent green of spring, not native to the Americas was brought over on the Mayflower as a vital food for health ), most foods that keep well over winter squashes potatoes salted meat or frozen are not great sources of Vitamin D .. so back in the day before year around fresh veggies and fruit ( ah, the traditional Christmas Watermelon ) a spring tonic really had a serious kick and brought folks out of the "winter blues" some fish are a good source of vit D

The Government mandates food processors add vitamins to prevent the diseases of vitamin deficiency ( malnutrition, which has nothing to do eating to much or too little or gaining weight or losing weight ) it's all about the vitamins and minerals not the calories
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I give up don't know what you are referring to
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
okay, well, whatever
 
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