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Discussion Starter #1
Some of you know that I form brass for my type 38s using 30-40 or .303 British brass. I have found, with two early Type 38s, that the chamber, specifically the neck, is cut very long. One of the rifles was an early, I believe no type rifle, and the other a Series 4 Nagoya with serial #459X. Both of these weapons would have been made around 1933 or earlier. For some reason, the neck is very long and a case with an OAL of 2.09" will fit in them, no problem, even though there is a .269" diameter bullet seated in them. On the other hand, I have a type I that requires the case to be trimmed to an OAL of 2.01" I'm wondering if there a difference that anyone has noted between chambers on early type 38s and those that would have been produced closer to the 1938-1940 period. I like the longer neck, gets the crimping groove right where it needs to be with this .269", 160gr cast bullet, when it is seated out to the rifling.
 

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Original 6.5 type 38 ammo used a round nose bullet. Later 6.5 ammo used spitzer bullets. I may have something to do with that.
 

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Seems like people are in the know on this posting so I have a quick question. I'm planning on buying Norma brass and bullets. I noticed that your bullets are the round nose type with a knurl. I'm going with SPBT but don't seem to find knurled bullets in .264 diameter. Is it a problem not useing knurled bullets in the 140 grain weight? Thanks and did'nt mean to do post hi-jacking.
 

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I have a ch tool company cannelure tool. I can but a knurl on any bullet anywhere I want it. My 6.5 loads use a .264 BTSP 140 grain bullet. They came with no cannelure I put it right where it needed to be. An uncrimped bullet will rely only on neck tension to hold the bullet in the cartridge resulting in very erratic velocity. A good crimp leads to much more uniform velocity.
 

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Thanks. I'll check them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually, what you see in the photos of my bullet is what is know as a lube groove, but there's no lube in that one. Ed, I wonder if there was a difference in the twists of the Type 38s for roundnose and spitzer?
 

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I know for a fact there was a rifleing change from 6 grooves to 4 grooves. It's in Franks book. The brit's like 5 groove rifling for some reason. MY US 1917 enfield uses 5 groove rifling too. I think it's left hand twist too? I never noticed any diffference when firing. My 1917 still sports the original barrel. It shoots very well for near 100 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Ed, I saw on another board where the early ones were 1/8 and later ones 1/9. I can't say when that change was made, maybe one the experts knows.
 

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I know for a fact there was a rifleing change from 6 grooves to 4 grooves. It's in Franks book. The brit's like 5 groove rifling for some reason. MY US 1917 enfield uses 5 groove rifling too. I think it's left hand twist too? I never noticed any diffference when firing. My 1917 still sports the original barrel. It shoots very well for near 100 years old.
The last time I had my P14 and My M1917 on the bench at the same time, I made it a point to check out the rifling. I can tell you for a fact that the "swirlies" in my 1916-made Winchester P14, and in the November 1917 dated barrel on my Winchester M1917 go in opposite directions.
 

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Your probably right. It's my Austrailian No 1 MkIII that makes a left turn and has 5 groove rifling like my 1917 enfield.
 
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