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I recently purchased a 1950s No4 MkI*. It is my first enfield so obviously I'm not well versed in it's markings. It is marked in several places with what appears to be a crown and the letters BNP. It is also marked with a D on the stock. Does anyone know what these markings mean? I do know that it was a greek issue but thats about it.

Also if somebody could tell me how to install the sling I'd appreciate it but if not thats ok.
 

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The crown and BNP is the Birmingham Nitro Proof mark, commercial proofing required by law in the UK...applied post-service.

As for the sling...the ends get passed through the swivels, bottom to top, so that the flat side of the rivets on the ends (if there is a flat side) is toward the wood, and the hooks are facing out.

As seen in this picture (although the butt end loop should only be a hand span wide in order to be correct).
 

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uniformity

As seen in this picture (although the butt end loop should only be a hand span wide in order to be correct).
That has always been an issue with me jrhead. The rule when I served in the RAF was that the butt end loop was as tight as possible, ie through the swivel & fasten. Now I recognise that the only time I carried a rifle was on parades so possibly that was the reason as it brings the top down in line with the mag & gave a good sound on the command, General Salute, Present Arms. Perhaps other forum members with service in the British Army could shed some light.

Sprog
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Long Branch

Thanks for the info jrhead, yea I had this crazy dream the night I got the rifle that BNP stood for something along the lines of Royal Grenadiers or some weird thing. I have no idea where my subconscious got that; I woke up and thought to my self "Did I just actually dream about that...wow" lol
 

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Perhaps other forum members with service in the British Army could shed some light.
That's where I'd originally heard that, although I have seen pictures of the sling as you describe (the cover of the LES, for example). I'll certainly concede to those that have actually carried the things.
 

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From the 1940s (?) onwards it became the norm to have the butt loop of the sling set at about 1 1/2", with all the remaining adjustment in the front loop. Probably two reasons: (1) continuity between rifles on parade; (2) quicker to adjust, and with greater range of adjustment, in the one loop.

By "norm", I mean it was taught at Sandhurst (having the senior WO in the Army, plus Guards' DS staff) and Pirbright (the Guards depot until recently), and therefore was the official drill for the Army.

This applied to the No4 and then the L1A1. The SA80 has its unique web sling...
 

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The SA-80 sling is the only one I know of that requires retraining the soldier how to install it each time it is removed! LOL
Seems odd that most folks still call it an SA80.
The only rifle that requires heavy lubrication to function in a sand enviroment.
 

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What year did Long Branch stop making the No1*?

I have one dated 1950 as well.

Cheers all,
Lachy.
 

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Lachy, The last official year is 1950 ending with the 95L prefix. Assembly did carry on into 1951 as some 95L rifles have '51 dated barrels.

Cattle4, A lot Long Branchs were lent to Greece and subsequently returned to England, hence the BNP stamp.

Regards, Brad
 
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