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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
So I went back through my records and figured exactly how much I paid for the rifle. I got it on GunBroker for $140.00 and after S&H and FFL transfer I have $210.00 in it so far.
 

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Check APEX gun parts as well as BRP corporation for hand guards & parts and bounce prices vs. Liberty Tree.

I have seen Long Branch No.4's with and without groove hand guard. I don't think a plain walnut one will crash the party here.. I'd leave the finish alone You need a new entire fore end which won't be cheap. Thank you for listing what you have into the rifle..$200 and what your parts to restore cost up to this date ...$400. You are very much in a money pit already which has been a subject flogged to many here about such "Projects". I wish you luck completing this rifle and hope you score some wood parts.

Just to note, a mint Long Branch fore end is $200 and I have one guy already interested in it. PM and I'll send photos. If you can find one cheaper...don't hesitate !
I have spare No4 forends. Haven’t checked if any are Long Branch. I can lay them out and take a photo. See which wood match is closest to your stock.
 

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I have restored a lot of orphans in my day. In fact I have 2 on here I am doing now. One a total train wreck I have been working on for years (a jap paratrooper rifle that still isn't done I would love to finish sometime soon), and a G43 that isn't far behind in the sense of a train wreck. If you enjoy restoring vintage and antique guns, go for it. I do it a lot and some probably aren't worth it. As long as you don't have a resale plan, because you'll have as much or more in it than it's worth. I got a couple people rather heated when I posted here about restoring my G43 given the time and money required to do it. I was set to part it out based on the responses I got because people seemed offended I would even try. But I got a bit of a shot in the arm from someone else who restores that particular weapon that really can be applied to many of the vintage military weapons we all love. He said:
"Today we call these rifles "Project Guns". We spend years trying to find the original parts to put back on them, or we learn to make the parts ourselves. We try to restore them to original specs and appearance. Someday barrelled actions will be impossible to find and the rifles we restore today will be worth as much to collectors as the perfect "as issued" rifles are today that somehow managed to sit in a Veterans closet for 50 years and escaped the hack saw and the cutting torch. Our grandkids will appreciate our efforts."

Sometimes it's not about the money, it's about the education along the way, and the preservation for the next person to enjoy. I know that's what it is for me.
 

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Sometimes it's not about the money, it's about the education along the way, and the preservation for the next person to enjoy. I know that's what it is for me.
Can only agree with the sentiment, my No1 is the biggest 'bitsa' in the world I think there is a part from every manufacturer, there are 'millions of No1 rifles, but not another the same', it has a commercial value as a 'pretty looking shooter', it has little or no value as a collectible, but to me it will be the last one to leave me - it has value beyond measure. I sourced parts from almost every continent, I built it, I learned how it all went together.

I learned a lot.

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Nothing wrong with that sentiment Alan, or your rifle for that matter. Very nice indeed and I'm sure you love the old girl.

I'm sure that many No.1 rifles picked up from no-man's land in WW1 or that arrived back in England from Dunkirk filthy and salt water soaked, or that went through FTR at any time ended up with parts from different makers too.

I love the "Flanders Flap". I picked one up from what you Poms would call a car boot sale for A$2 many years ago. I didn't know what it was at the time but it looked interesting so I bought it.

3789881

3789884
 

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+1 /\ /\
The educational value of anyone's interest is really the most important aspect of any pursuit.

Some guys build model ships...some guys save old rifles...some guys collect stamps...
 

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I'm sure that many No.1 rifles picked up from no-man's land in WW1 or that arrived back in England from Dunkirk filthy and salt water soaked,

A couple more pictures

1) Pick-ups on the Somme between July and November 1916 Collected for 'return to stores' for servicing / repairing. Squads were sent out every night to pick up whatever equipment they could and return it to 'stores'.

2) WW2, troops returning home being disarmed prior to embarkation.

The_Battle_of_the_Somme,_July-november_1916_Q1446.jpg
WW2 Troops returning.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
So while I've been waiting for parts I've been experimenting on the old chopped up forend and it has become horrendously clear that the tools I have are extremely inadequate. I would rather not have to go back with Acraglas because I buggered it up. What tools do I need to get to properly fit the action to the new forend?
 

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So while I've been waiting for parts I've been experimenting on the old chopped up forend and it has become horrendously clear that the tools I have are extremely inadequate. I would rather not have to go back with Acraglas because I buggered it up. What tools do I need to get to properly fit the action to the new forend?
At the very least my friend I would invest in a chisel set. A nice chisel set isn't that expensive. Also a small file set to smooth up the areas you may need the chisels for. For the areas that the action doesn't fit the fore end I suggest getting and using inletting black. Before I knew about inletting black, I used fire engine red lipstick. it pretty much does the same but cheaper. This will show you where the action is touching the wood before it sits properly in the for end. You can take away small parts of the forend without gouging big chunks to make it fit. It will save you a lot of headache and score big on appearance with your final product.

 

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At the very least my friend I would invest in a chisel set. A nice chisel set isn't that expensive. Also a small file set to smooth up the areas you may need the chisels for. For the areas that the action doesn't fit the fore end I suggest getting and using inletting black. Before I knew about inletting black, I used fire engine red lipstick. it pretty much does the same but cheaper. This will show you where the action is touching the wood before it sits properly in the for end. You can take away small parts of the forend without gouging big chunks to make it fit. It will save you a lot of headache and score big on appearance with your final product.

Buy good chisels and then follow instructions like this to sharpen them.
Does not matter how much you pay for them or what the brand distributor claims they will not be sharp. You have to do that yourself. You will not see genuine manufacturer claims because the brand name company has nothing to do with making them. Most chisels, like knives, are made in china and they require inspection and care on your part. They could be junk or they may be OK. Most small brand names do not have inspectors on the manufacturing floor in china (like apple, nike, etc do) to watch the quality so you sometimes get what you get. There are good ones out there or better yet do yard sales and flea markets to look for the older ones that were not made in china. I bought a japanese saw a couple years ago because I needed one. Damn thing is a japanese saw made in china.

All that being said, sharp tools are you friend and you can do it.
 

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A little help to narrow down the shopping and reviewing. I made my living and used a variety. Rough work to trim, I used different ones.
For rough work I used older Buck Brothers. Those were OK but I abused them.
Everyday usage were Stanley professional line.
Fine trim and mortising are Record/Marples. The Records have long shanks for deep mortising on doors and pockets. You won't need those yet.

A set of Stanley's or Bucks should suit your needs. Supplement the set with a narrow one for fine work in corners and narrow places. 1/4 or narrower unless you get one in a larger set.

Here's a surprise for you. Grab a set of the cheap bottom line Stanley chisels which are paper/plastic wrapped. Black handles and thin steel. They have somewhat decent steel/edge retention and are easy to make razor sharp. I never trusted them 100% for striking, but they pare and scrape excellent.

I never brought them into the field, but they are in my chisel drawer at home. Every now and then I reach for one.
 

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A little help to narrow down the shopping and reviewing. I made my living and used a variety. Rough work to trim, I used different ones.
For rough work I used older Buck Brothers. Those were OK but I abused them.
Everyday usage were Stanley professional line.
Fine trim and mortising are Record/Marples. The Records have long shanks for deep mortising on doors and pockets. You won't need those yet.

A set of Stanley's or Bucks should suit your needs. Supplement the set with a narrow one for fine work in corners and narrow places. 1/4 or narrower unless you get one in a larger set.

Here's a surprise for you. Grab a set of the cheap bottom line Stanley chisels which are paper/plastic wrapped. Black handles and thin steel. They have somewhat decent steel/edge retention and are easy to make razor sharp. I never trusted them 100% for striking, but they pare and scrape excellent.

I never brought them into the field, but they are in my chisel drawer at home. Every now and then I reach for one.
Excellent!!!
 
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I have both Sears Craftsman and English Record chisels. Not wanting to trust to doing the sharpening with mt hands only, I bought a guide to maintain the original factory bevel. But always run the back of the chisel across a stone because both manufacturers chisels had a hollow back. Then set the chisel in the guide and over a series of stones actually sharpen it. The Sears chisels I bought about 25 years ago and the English Record chisels probably 30 years ago. Had a wood working store back in NY I used to visit. Sold everything you could possibly want from the wood itself, finishes,tools, and just about any kind of power tool. Frank
 

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What do you all think of the Shop Fox 12-piece chisel set? I don't know a whole lot about this topic, but most of the chisels look like they might be useful in a firearms setting. Would I be better off with something like this over a standard chisel set that I can get at Home Depot? Shop Fox 12 Pc. Carving Chisel Set in Aluminum Case
Are you planning on whittling your own rifle stock? :)
Gouges etc are used in advanced woodworking. A couple of those might come in handy, but nothing which can't be done with basic tools and a bit of experience.
Can't speak of the chisels, but the name is an offshoot of Grizzly. Of which I don't own either. Research the reviews to determine quality of steel, source, etc. In that price range I wouldn't expect too much in the way of specialty items.
Ask yourself, can you sharpen them with what you have at your disposal? Sharpening all those shapes requires additional skill sets. Should you advance to that level, the tools you want/need will total into the hundreds of dollars for true quality.

Tip: get a deluxe X-acto handle and buy a few of the tips you might need after you realize what you might need. Better quality in the price range. Disposable working ends. Since they won't be used often at all, everything stores in a small case out of the way inside a seldom used tool box drawer.

Someday you may want the specialty gouges. But not today. At least I don't think so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Thank you everyone for the chisel advise. I ended up getting a 1/4 chisel from home depot. It's not the nicest but it will work for now. I also picked up a 1/2 chisel from a second hand store for 75 cents which I took to work and restored on a surface grinder. Once again it's not the best but it will work.
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