Gunboards Forums banner
21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The Long Branch Singer sights had a relatively short life. Too expensive and time consuming to manufacture but if you can find one today you're looking at $100.+ for one with the "LB" stamp. I can't see the letter at the top on yours in the pic, but if it's "F" it's Fazakerly, or "B" I believe to be BSA. Also on the Long Branch Singer sights had a smaller peep aperture than the British ones. I believe your '44 should have Mk.II or III sliding sight. IIRC, the unpopular "300-600" flip sight had been replaced by that point. You have a black walnut buttstock and birch fore end wood. The Canadian wood in '44 would probably have either the "LB" or C-Broad Arrow stamp.
The rear sight ladder has a P and below it a CR40 (C? can't tell last digit). The slider is marked with a P and a CR318. The buttstock has an L just forward of the buttplate tang.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,803 Posts
The mag matches the gun and I noticed the front stock band (not the front barrel band) is marked CE1967 and a barrel marking is stamped 67. Is that just a coincidence?
The CE1967 furniture and metalwork was produced in 1967 on a contract (believed to be) for South Africa, but never sent due to apartheid sanctions, There have been many 1000's of the 'kits' floating around for many years and I have just recently sold my last 4 sets to a guy in the Klondike.

The rifle has been rebuilt / new furniture in civilian hands - maybe a rebuilt sporterised rifle.

15 years ago I was paying US$25 for each 'kit' and I hand selected all of the components to be colour / grain matched and only picked the L-length butts.
As with all things Enfield prices have escalated considerably since then

These were the 'kits'



Fixture Gas Rectangle Font Electric blue





Textile Wood Gesture Material property Art
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,399 Posts
I had to stop and translate for a second. A Long Branch Singer sight.
Was it made in Scotland for Long Branch, or was is made in Canada to supplement Singer UK production? How do they differ? What are the markings to distinguish if any?
That was my first impression, which only lasted about a second and a half before assuming the name Singer was being used repeatedly in place of Mk1.
If it screwed me up, then how might that confuse others?

Just sayin'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I had to stop and translate for a second. A Long Branch Singer sight.
Was it made in Scotland for Long Branch, or was is made in Canada to supplement Singer UK production? How do they differ? What are the markings to distinguish if any?
That was my first impression, which only lasted about a second and a half before assuming the name Singer was being used repeatedly in place of Mk1.
If it screwed me up, then how might that confuse others?

Just sayin'
Long Branch did produce what was commonly referred to as the "Singer" sight, the micrometer adjusted rear sight. The ones I had bore the "LB" stamp. The fixed battle sight aperture was smaller than the ones made in the UK, but I was told that it was too small for quick target acquisition and later bored out to a larger diameter more in line with the British ones. While I can't say that's true, I do know that the ones I had did indeed have a smaller battle sight aperture. I don't know the exact time frame, but as I'd mentioned earlier, I believe that for the sake of expediency they went to simpler stamped sliding rear sights or the 2 position flip sight. I've had 2 of the Long Branch sights pass through my hands over the years. I'm kicking myself in the butt for not picking up more of them when I had the chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Maybe I will try to locate a Long Branch stock set and sell the one I have eventually. For now I'm going to enjoy just having another No 4 Mk 1 in my collection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I assume my rifle would have had the smooth handguards being 1944 dated, correct?
 

·
Gold Bullet Member/Moderator/Administrator/
Joined
·
27,184 Posts
Not always the case. LB put a mix of smooth and grooved upper HG’s all the way through 1950.
Nice rifle. Agreed mid 1950’s-60’s UK wood.
I assume my rifle would have had the smooth handguards being 1944 dated, correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Not always the case. LB put a mix of smooth and grooved upper HG’s all the way through 1950.
Nice rifle. Agreed mid 1950’s-60’s UK wood.

Well I don't have much in hardware for No. 4's, and I have no fore ends. I did find this, think this would suit my rifle better??
 

Attachments

·
Gold Bullet Member/Moderator/Administrator/
Joined
·
27,184 Posts
Yes that is a Canadian Arsenal butt.exactly what you need. 1949/1950 butts used black steel butt plates.
1944 butt would wear a zymack (sp) alloy plate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
Yes that is a Canadian Arsenal butt.exactly what you need. 1949/1950 butts used black steel butt plates.
1944 butt would wear a zymack (sp) alloy plate.
I know exactly what plate you are talking about, used to have a bunch. gave them away over the years. Now I need to find a Canadian fore end and hand guard set..............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So I have been looking and I didn't realize that Canadian Fore ends are hard to find. There isn't really anything out there. I can find Long Branch hand guards, though not the ribbed ones I like best.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top