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Good afternoon!

So I recently picked up this Springfield 1847 from an estate sale. I'm not new to firearms but this is the first BP firearm I've ever had. The musket is rifled and I've already ordered some .69 cal minie balls from Jefferson Arsenal but I still need to buy some BP. I've done some research and I believe around 70 grains of Goex FFg would be a good load but I would like confirmation from someone who knows more than I do before I go trying to shoot this thing.

If you have a better load recommendation or could give me any useful tips please let me know, like I said I know very little when it come to BP firearms.


Here's some pics of the Springfield, if you know anything about it please let me know. I don't know much other than than it appears to be a cavalry carbine.

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IMG_5686.jpg IMG_5693.jpg

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I noticed the metal was polished but figured it would still make a good shooter. The price I paid was less than a new reproduction. Is there really much risk with shooting lower powered loads through it?
 

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I noticed the metal was polished but figured it would still make a good shooter. The price I paid was less than a new reproduction. Is there really much risk with shooting lower powered loads through it?

The stock age is what i a more concerned about, at this age they can easily crack around the lock work. I have shoot period Black powder firearms similar in age, it all depends on how the wood is structurally. One thing about a muzzle loader in black powder, you are the hand loader so you can make it as hot or light as you wish, even 10 grains of black powder will have enough energy to have the ball go out of the barrel. Hows the nipple condition? have you tried to remove to make sure the nipple channel is free and clear? Track of the wolf is a great place to start for supplies.
 

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What Spaxspore said. Also check the breech of the barrel. Some times it.s pitted right atthe face of the breech plug. As far as shooting it goes. If its
sound wood and metal. Have at. Back in the 60s if you shoot NSSA and wanted anything other than a Zouve. You shot an original. Sometimes with a new barrel or not. I shot a 3 band Enfield aand a Smiths carbine for years. Yes put some wear on them, but with good cleaning etc. They survived nicely. Starting load. Try 45/50 grains of FFg. Good load for 50/100 yards. That 70 grs. is pertty much a service charge. So unless you are going to bang away at a couple 300 hundred yards you can down load it. You can always work up from there. If you really want to shoot it. It's been cleaned and polished I don't see it would hurt it much to have some fun with it.
 

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go for it. I have several, well many of original's and with light/ moderate loads they function just fine as they did hundreds of years ago. both flint & percussion. just clean as you would a reproduction. JMHO.
 

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Mike, do you have any idea of the value of that carbine (Flayderman 9A-303)?
In that condition I’d say around $4,000 to $5,000. I think that it would be a poor idea to load and shoot this one given its value. Maybe you should consider selling this one and using the money to buy ...(fill in the blank).
But you did good to buy it at the estate sale. Congratulations!
PS, I’ve been a collector of original American blackpowder firearms since the 1960’s.
 

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First, that's an awesome looking carbine. Great find. Second, I also say go for it. The breech on the 1842 is very hefty. I shoot my full length 1842 musket regularly. I use 60gr FF.
Some people like looking at them. Others like shooting their originals. I prefer the latter. What's the use in owning one if you can't shoot it? Nothing like bringing an old war horse back to life. Very satisfying. I even shoot my 1926 dated Hall rifle.
 

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First, that's an awesome looking carbine. Great find. Second, I also say go for it. The breech on the 1842 is very hefty. I shoot my full length 1842 musket regularly. I use 60gr FF.
Some people like looking at them. Others like shooting their originals. I prefer the latter. What's the use in owning one if you can't shoot it? Nothing like bringing an old war horse back to life. Very satisfying. I even shoot my 1926 dated Hall rifle.
Damn, I didn't know Harper's Ferry was still building Halls in the mid-1920s. Wow!! What load to you use and are they as "leaky" as accounts from the first quarter of the 19th indicate? And have you removed the breech section and used it as pistol yet?
 

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Hi Clyde, thanks for catching my typo. My Hall is dated 1826. Oops! I use 50gr FF and the leakage is not noticeable. Maybe it's because I regularly shoot flintlocks and I'm used to a big flash in front of my eyes. Lol.

Just keeping to the point, if an original is in sound condition and you have the urge to shoot it, why not do what it was made to do. Just don't forget to clean it afterwards as black powder residue is unforgiving...
 

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Don't know what weight minies you ordered and I am not current on moulds. Rapine used to make a 500 gr. minie which might be comfortable. I own an old Lyman 730 gr. minie which i shot in a full length Belgian musket. Got my attention. I would think would be a real thumper in that little piece.. Let us know how it works out, Jaeger.
 

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Hi Clyde, thanks for catching my typo. My Hall is dated 1826. Oops! I use 50gr FF and the leakage is not noticeable. Maybe it's because I regularly shoot flintlocks and I'm used to a big flash in front of my eyes. Lol.

Just keeping to the point, if an original is in sound condition and you have the urge to shoot it, why not do what it was made to do. Just don't forget to clean it afterwards as black powder residue is unforgiving...

Just funnin' you. I am unfortunately familiar with typos of that nature. MOSTLY I catch them, but far from always.
 
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