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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
List of famous users of Swedish guns.
This list of famous swedegun-users is a remake of a thread from the old board, and therefore might be already known to some. But I think it is worth keeping. I'll try to keep the list updated through time. But don't hesitate to write if you stumble over another famous Husqvarnauser.

Cheers from Umimmak Torulleq


The list goes as this:

Explorers:

Salomon A. Andree who in 1897 tried to reach the northpole together with two friends in a balloon. They brought with them 2 smoothbore Remingtonguns in gauge 20 and a doublebore with a smoothbore gauge 20 and a rifled barrel caliber .450. All three from Husqvarna. It did though not help them much, though they actually killed several polar bears with them. All three men died in their unsuccessful voyage towards the pole.

Explorer Sten Bergman who traveled in Asia also had a Husqvarnagun. A model 46 in 9,3 x 57 serial nr. 1241. All though he also had a German Otto Bock s/s kal. 12-65, serialnr. 10255 that got rusty after having been aboard a ship that sunk between Japan and Kamchatka. Both guns were sold at an auction at Widforss for next to nothing in may 2005.

Sten Bergmans daugther Astrid Bergman Sucksdorff, who accompanied her father during some of his travels, is also very famous (at least in Sweden) for her many photos from nature and is also a keen hunter who used her Husqvarna 30-06 to kill man eating tigers in India (she also carried a S & W revolver named The Last Chance!).

Nansen and Johansen used a pair of .360 caliber/20 gauge combination guns and Nagant revolvers on their amazing expedition.

Anyway, Nansen was quite a gun nut, also had an early commercial Krag Jørgensen built in Danish 8x58R caliber, amongst many others. Evidently he was always playing around with various calibers. Indeed, he lost a .500 side-by-side rifle most unfortunately when it went over the side of one of the Fram's boats on a side trip on the way into the ice. It is still lying at the bottom of the Kara Sea.

To Nansens guns on the first Fram trip. His personal shotgun was given to him by C. Dick, a shotgun made by E.C.Green. He did also get shotguns from Holland & Holland and six guns with one of Paradox mode and a double rifle in cal. .577. From H & H Nansen got spare parts, ammo and reloading tools and two harpoon guns. Nansen had also an 450 Express made by Purdey.
Krag & Jørgensen made up an 45-90 on spare danish Krag parts. Nansen did also get an 8x58RD Krag with him and ammo made at Hovedarsenalet with soft pointed bullets. Nansen ordered four Nagant revolvers especially for him with the longest barrel over eight inches.
When Fram set sail the 24 of June 1893 the crew was armed with 24 revolvers and 32 rifles. Many of his guns are at display at the Fram Museum in Oslo.

There is a link to see some of the guns used aboard the Fram here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:K...gton_M1867.jpg

As you can see there was a scoped Krag-Jørgensen, civilian M1894 with carved stock, a Krag-Petersson, a Jarmann M1884 and a Remington M1867

Roald Amundsen (famous Norwegian polar explorer and the first man on the South Pole) brought with him on the expedition to the Pole hundreds of pounds of ammunition, though in the period of equipping the expedition, c. 1909-1910, I am guessing that at least some were Norwegian Krags, and possibly Rolling Blocks that were popular with sealers at the time. And according to research at the old post he also brought a Norwegian Jarmanngevaer M/1884 in 10.15mm. They were used by the Norwegian army from 1884 to the mid 1890s.

In addition, Ammundsen and his crew brought revolvers, again no doubt the Nagants, used to shoot the dogs along the way and especially at the "Butcher Shop" where many were depoted for man and dog food on the return leg of his successful trek to the South Pole.

And sadly, Hjalmar Johansen committed suicide with his Nagant revolver.

The mentioned Nagants must have been of Swedish manufacture I guess. That means made by HVA.

When worldfamous Swedish explorer Sven Hedin traveled through Asia he brought with him an armament consisting of this: Two shotguns (he doesn't specify which), a Russian Berdanrifle and six S&W revolvers and one Swedish officers revolver and two boxes of ammunition. I suppose that the Nagant therefore is the only Swedish gun that we will know of in his use.

Heroes:

Finnish marshal Mannerheim who, among several other guns, including a Purdey, had a Swedish 6,5 mm infantry rifle in his personal arsenal.

Swedish Pilot and now forgotten national hero Einar Lundborg was a colorful character who fought the reds in Finland ca. 1917-18 and again in Estonia ca. 1918-19. During his time there he drove around in an armored car and the reds got pretty tired of him and promised a bounty of 1 mio. rubles to the bolchevik that could get him, dead or alive!
Later he reached fame when he flew his air fighter to the polar ice and rescued Italian Airforce-general Umberto Nobile who had tried to overfly the North Pole by airship, but crash landed on the surface ice on his way home. Lundborg managed to land his plane on the ice and get the wounded Nobile out. But on his next trip Lundborg too crash landed on the ice and now was captive with the remaining airship crewmembers. And it was here that he had his Browning service pistol (made under license at Husqvarna) and his fine, new Husqvarna carbine with him. Both guns were needed since the Italians had two Italian rifles that had broken down and the only gun left was a Colt with 6 rounds left, since they already had killed one polar bear with it! So Lundborg's Husqvarna carbine was used to shoot the next attacking bears and after several weeks they were all rescued by a russian ship. At that time they had spent nearly 2 months on the ice!
Sadly Lundborg was later killed during testflights in a new Saab-fighterplane.

Finnish/American war hero Larry Allen Thorn (a.k.a. Lauri Allan Thörni) fought in Finland against the reds, later with the german SS (again against the reds) and then moved to USA, joined the Special Forces as a captain and fought the reds in Vietnam and Laos. When he was killed in a helicoptercrash in the jungle, he carried a Swedish sub machine-gun, The Swedish K. After having been listed as Missing in action for 34 years Thorne's remains were refound and he was buried at Arlington Cemetery as a real American war hero. Thorne also became the inspiration for Hollywoodacttor John Wayne in the movie "The Green Berets".

Also Joe Galloway (famous from the Vietnam-war-movie We Were Soldiers, with Mel Gibson) is photographed with a Swedish K: Look here: http://www.thecatfromhue.com/frankieshouse.htm
Another example is famous reporter and whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, who is photographed with a Swedish k in his hand during the war in Vietnam (source: http://www.mintpressnews.com/mnar-m...reate-an-excuse-for-war-the-whistlebl/213582/ ).

Another (not so nice guy) who used the Swedish K was Lieutenant Islambouli, who murdered President Sadat in Egypt in 1981 with his Swedish K. This is not so surprising, since the Egyptian Army had bought the tools and drawings from the Swedes, to make Swedish guns on license.

Swedish hero Raoul Wallenberg, who during WWII saved thousands of Hungarian Jews in Budapest and was a real hero, had a 9 mm HVA-pistol and a license for it. Unfortunately it didn't help him when he needed it, since he disappeared under unknown circumstances in Stalin's Gulag. The gun + license is shown below.

Spies:

Swedish Air Force-colonel Stig Wennerström owned a HVA-made Rolling Blok 12,7 x 44 (and a little belgian-made 7.65 pistol). The colonel reached a sort of fame when he admitted guilty in spying for the Russians against Sweden. By passing the reds secrets about the Swedish military he betrayed his country and got life imprisonment in 1964. He though came out as early as 1974 and died in spring 2006 at he age of 99. The only motive for his espionage seems to have been ½ mio. SEK.

Famous Swedish author Jan Guillou, who wrote the ongoing saga of secret agent Carl Gustaf Hamilton (Swedish answer to James Bond), is an eager hunter and uses a handmade Viggo Olsson VO1900 in 7 mm Remington Magnum. The Swedish mauser is also mentioned in one of his spy novels (as a possession of the secret spymaster only known as DG). Later it was revealed that Guillou himself had worked for KGB against Sweden!

Royal users:

HM Queen Margarethe II of Denmark used a HVA submachinegun when she served with the women's Airforce Home Guard.

Several Swedish kings and princes have used and still uses HVA-guns for their moose-hunts.

And a lot of other royals and Saudi Arabian oil sheiks also uses HVA-guns for hunting.

Even the Shah of Persia was given a highly engraved 1640 with his coat-of-arms inlaid in gold as a gift from the Swedish King when he visited Sweden in 1960.

Also famous artists have used Husqvarna guns:

Swedish painter and writer of a very nice handbook on moose hunting Lindorm Liljefors was given a HVA-gun as a gift.

Even Ernest Hemingway got an engraved 1640.

Hollywoodactor Glenn Ford, who recieved the first American imported HVA Lightweight rifle, look here: http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=35170

Swedish singer Evert Taube had a Swedish mauser (along with some other guns including a German conquered Russian Mosin-Nagant and a Winchester gun). They all now are in USA. Thanks to Ken/Kebco for this info on Taube's guns.

Firing squads:

A rather infamous "user", who actually "used it from the wrong end" was norwegian traitor Widkun Quisling who was executed with 10 shots from Swedish mausers in Oslo in 1945. To be absolutely sure that he was dead, the leading executioner gave him a final shot in the head with his pistol. You can read an interview with a remaining participant from the execution (who tells of the Swedish mausers) here: http://www.dagbladet.no/nyheter/1999/10/11/179844.html

In Denmark the 9 mm Husqvarna pistol was also used for coup de grace between 1946-50. We though didn't use the Swedish mausers for that!

Others:

Famous lovecouble Danish gipsy-princess Elvira Madigan and her lover, Swedish lieutenant Sixten Sparre ran away together since they loved each other so much. After having kept hidden a long time they ran out of money and committed suicide with Sparre's Husqvarnamade Nagant. Their tragic death is considered some sort of classic love-drama, and has probably inspired a lot of love-novels.

Famous Hollywoodactors like Robert Redford use Swedish submachineguns in a few movies. Look here:
http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/Carl_Gustav_M/45

The Sirius Patrol, who patrols by dogsledge in Northeast Greenland also are known for their use of Enfield P17 (in DK known as Hjemmeværnsgevær M 53/17), but on a seal hunt with them in 2008 they used HVA 1640 since, they told me, it was about the only thing that kept shooting in the harsh environment.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
This post have been lying still for some time. Here is a small add:

Recently I hunted seals here in North East Greenland with 2 members of the military Siriuspatrol. One of the most strange military units in NATO. At least the only one that is transported by dog sledge, since it is still the best way of transport up here!

Well, the two soldiers carried Glock pistols to be used against polarbears. A common threat here! But for rifles they have for many years used the old american P17 30-06 from WW I since it can take the cold, that no modern rifle seem to be able to!

Then some fool realized that they needed a modern rifle an introduced the german Blazer R 93! Ooops! It took very short time before the modern straight-pull broke down. It is definetely not designed for this climate! So what to do-what to do?

Exactly where it came from I don't know, but they had got there hands on a really nice rifle that performed exellent on that hunt, far better than any straight-pull, that was carried out from snow scooteres at the frozen sea ice. And yes, one of the guys did shoot a seal with it!

And what kind of rifle was it then? It was of course a Husqvarna 1640 with mauser claw etc. The only rifle that has seemed to take the test up here 1100 km north of the arctic circle! And the fact that a rifle made in the sixties is more reliable, than a modern Blazer straight-pull surely tells someting of reliability and quality! At least you'll never make me use those straight-pulls, I'm definitely used to better stuff! And so are the dogsledge patroll that patrolls thousands of uninhabitated arctic coast each year! Long live the good old Husqvarnas, now (again) in military use!

Best from Umimmak
 

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Very good post, as usual, Umimmak!

So, how was the seal hunt?... did you bite some dark raw meat?...
Well, I have a Sako Hi-Power wich was intensively used as a seal hunter, in the Madeleine Islands (Iles-de-la-Madeleine) area, too. The brine did not make it rust too much, though.
And that's why, we too, in Canada, enjoy so much these oldies from Sweden.
Do you enjoy some kind of summer up there.... here, on the continent, it's nasty.

Enjoy life, and some sun, take good care (of you and your guns!).
 

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Ummimak, I ALWAYS love your posts and really enjoy your sagas from the north.

Some years ago I sold my Danish-issued 1917 to a friend. Before I sold it I shot a buck with it here.

I was just over his place the other day and saw it on the wall.

Wouldn't mind getting it back!

Been reading Amundsen's Northwest Passage account.

I need to post some quotes here.
 

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Great post!!

Now I can tell folks that ask about my Swedish Nagant revolver that such guns were used by Scandinavian polar explorers to slaughter sled dogs. QUOTE "In addition, Ammundsen and his crew brought revolvers, again no doubt the Nagants, used to shoot the dogs along the way and especially at the "Butcher Shop" where many were depoted for man and dog food on the return leg of his sussessful trek to the South Pole."

Niklas
 

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Discussion Starter #6
New update with some really "juicy" details....

Hope the new update will not ruin your sleep, since they are of a sort of morbid caracter....

Best Umimmak
 

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Well, thank you for sharing the intersting "Dagbladet" story about Vidkun Queisling's final moments at front of the 6.5 X 55, 10 Swedish Mausers of the norwegian firing squad. I did not know much about the WW 2, swedish trained, norwegian "politisoldater" either.

I like the part in which that particular firing squad member, keep the empty shell as a momento, and he also pointed out, that all 10 shot hit the paper target, placed in front of Vidkun Quisling's heart, who, according to this firing squad member, also meet his fate with dignity.

Troels, intersting that you spend good time with the "Serius Patrol", which was created to patrol Northeastern Greenland, after the Norwegian Government officially annexed that piece of real estate in 1931 from the danish colony of Greenland.

Then norwegian defence minister, Vidkun Quisling, told the danish government that he would militarily enforce norwegian claims to Greenland, using norwegian warships.

However, scandinavian sanity prevailed, and both Norway and Denmark agreed to settle their serious territorial disputes in Greenland, in the International Court. Norway lost all, and had to vacate Northeastern Greenland in Denmarks favor, in 1933.

Vidkun Quisling, after he became head of state of the Nazi controlled Norway, attempted to reoccupy Northeastern Greenland again in 1940, by sending a group of norwegian settler on the ship "Bjoern", which was promtly arrested by a patrolling US icebraeker, before the US entered WW2.

Today, the only territory of Greenland, in which the dainsh military "Serius Patrol", is patrolling, is the area of Greenland, in which the government of Norway annexed 1931-33, under the watchful eye, of then norwegian defence minister Vidkun Quisling.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The list has now been re-updated with new users. Don't hesitate to add something, if you stumple over other famous users!

Best from Umimmak
 

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Hi

From Norway I got two more:

Max Manus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Manus

Leif Larsen. aka "Shetlands-Larsen". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shetlands-Larsen
Here's a clip from the 1954 move "Shetlands gjengen", were Larsen plays himself.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76l4wG4s0Fo&feature=player_detailpage


They both fought in Finland during the winter war. The norwegian voluntares were also in the swedish "Frivilligakåren" and had swedish weapons. I've seen a pic. once of Manus in swedish (or finnish?) uniform, armed with a M96.

Here's a photo of Max Manus as crownprince Olavs bodyguard in May 1945. Looks like a Husqvarna smg.

Max_Manus.jpg
 

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Francis Sell deserves mention.

The "official" personages and exploreers who use Husqvarna firearms are quite interesting. I am glad to have been in the military in the mechanized era, long after the "eat the ponies" (and dogs) phase of operations. I have never met a vehicle that I couldn't shoot in the block and walk away from. Since American movie personalities are mentioned, I think it appropriate to remember Francis Sell who was a very solid American outdoor writer from the 1950-1960 period. He hunted the Pacific Northwest and used a Husqvarna 6.5x55 full stock carbine (1600 action), among others, and actually listed the ballistics of the 9.3x57 in his discussions of suitable deer cartridges in his deer hunting books ca 1955. I bought my first 9.3x57 (a model 46) in 1987 as a result of seeing it in "Cartridges of the World" and reading about it in Sell's books. In 1988, Harry McGowen (then alive and working in Indiana) barreled up a 9.3x57 for me on a Czech military action that was drilled for a scope and I have been a fan ever sense. I have numerous Huskies at present but if I really had to, I could skimp by with a Huskie 146 and 310. And my Norwegian 1914 Aut Pistol as my night stand gun.
 

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Harry McGowen was in St. Anne, Illinois actually.

I know that. Aluminum cookware. 60's rock music. Lots of excuse for spongy holes in the brain other than "age" which would hurt my feelings. The big names of the outdoor writers (O'Connor, Page, Brown) in the 1950's gave scant mention of Husqvarna's products.
 

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The list has now been re-updated with new users. Don't hesitate to add something, if you stumple over other famous users!

Best from Umimmak
ERIK LUNDGREN - One of the most famous race car drivers in Europe during the 1950s and 1960s. Lundgren was known as the "Wizard of Ockelbo" because he won so many of the races that he entered into. I have his FSR target rifle.
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