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Discussion Starter #1
I found some good surplus ammo at a good price and would like to stock in a few thousand rounds. It's not getting cheaper! I have never bought large quantities before and am wondering about the legalities, after hearing about that BATF raid for 'ammo hoarding'. I've poked around online but can't find anything concrete. Figured someone here might know what the limits for ammo stocking is.

thanks!
paetersen
 

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dont tell

It probably varies with which jurisdiction you happen to reside in. You may be better off calling your local police anonymously and asking.
 

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legal limits for stocking ammo?

That's really scary that you're even asking that question, but as time passes and they keep changing the rules, it may be a concern. I think it depends where you live and the attitude of those around you. I hope it doesn't come to that, but "Who knows what evil lurks in the minds of men"? Only the Shadow knows!....(That ought to date me)...
 

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In this day and age there is no such thing as an anonymous call to your local police.

The odds of your connection with someone at any S.D. or P.O. who is familiar with whatever the current and real local laws regarding ammunition storage range from slim to none.

Your best bet is go to your local library or the law library at your local courthouse or township hall and look it up.
 

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radio show, "the shadow".

i used to listen to it as a kid.

that was in 1992. see, KNX would replay it during radio drama hour from 9 to 10 pm.

=)
 
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Ammo hoarding? I thought that is what the UN was doing, hoarding ammo away from US(I mean us).
 

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As far as I can see, if your floors haven't yet collapsed, and the walls aren't bulging, and you don't need tarps to keep it dry, you don't have "too much ammo". But keep working on it - everyone needs a goal!
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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There is no federal limit on the amount of ammunition an individual may own. I have never heard of a "BATF raid for 'ammo hoarding'". Some jurisdictions, state or local, may have limits. The most likely places would be California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, etc. If you're in the south or midwest I doubt you have a problem. Regardless, they have to know about it before it's a problem.
 

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No problemo in Floriduh.
Invariably, unless the owner has illegal class III weapons or explosives, those "raids" result in an apology and return of ammo and firearms.
Not that you'll ever read THAT in a newspaper, but if you follow the stories you'll find no articles on trials or convictions.
 

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A major concern would be the requirements of the fire code. hay would need to be researched.

As to telephone calls, use a pay phone if you are concerned about them knowing where the call came from.
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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I almost mentioned the fire marshal. A while back the City of Ft. Worth used the fire marshal's office to try to shut down Cheaper Than Dirt. They came up with some ridiculously low number of rounds of ammunition that could be stored at a single location within the city limits. I don't remember the exact amount but it was about one-third of the daily sales of CTD. They had a warehouse outside the city limits but it would have required three trips a day minimum to maintain their retail inventory. I don't know how it was ever resolved and it was certainly political grandstanding by the city. In a case like that though it's public knowledge that ammunition is stored on site and the fire marshal makes periodic inspections anyway. In a private residence no one but you and the UPS driver will know you have ammo there if you don't tell them. No gov't officials have any right to make an inspection without a warrant either. It would certainly be prudent to keep it out of sight in case there were a medical emergency and paramedics were allowed inside the house. I've heard of many cases where police were called by other emergency personnel because they saw something they didn't understand. If you rent, then maintenance personnel and landlord inspections are also an issue to consider. I'm not saying hide something because it's illegal, but hide it so you don't have to hire a lawyer to prove it's illegal. If your house were to catch fire it would be a good idea to let the firefighters know, not so much because of any added danger to them, but just so they're not surprised at all the little "pops" if it cooks off. Not knowing they might back off and let it burn, but understanding what it is they might continue to fight the fire and save some property.
 

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Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet Member
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If your house were to catch fire it would be a good idea to let the firefighters know, not so much because of any added danger to them, but just so they're not surprised at all the little "pops" if it cooks off. Not knowing they might back off and let it burn, but understanding what it is they might continue to fight the fire and save some property.

Don't count on the fireman trying to stop the fire if they hear "pops". At least it will take them a bit to do so, after someone tells them it is OK.

So make sure you have a good insurance policy on the house and contents. Also make sure the the insurance company will provide coverage in such an instance. It could fall under one of the exceptions or definitions in the policy.
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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Don't count on the fireman trying to stop the fire if they hear "pops". At least it will take them a bit to do so, after someone tells them it is OK.

So make sure you have a good insurance policy on the house and contents. Also make sure the the insurance company will provide coverage in such an instance. It could fall under one of the exceptions or definitions in the policy.
That was my point, if they don't know what's "popping" they're probably not going to take a chance. They still might not if the LT is clueless, but that's a chance you take.
 

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Call them from someones house that you don't like!
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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A big part of my job is dealing with local inspectors, including fire marshals. I can tell you from personal experience that the answer you get from one person will probably not be the answer you get from another, and neither will be the correct answer based on the actual code, regulation, or law. In most cases where it's not something they regularly deal with, which this probably wouldn't be, they are going to go to their boss, at least in a new construction case involving interpretation of the code. However, since this would be a "theoretical question" and not something they have a clear cut jurisdiction over anyway (I know, they have jurisdiction, but still don't have the right to inspect without probable cause, being a private residence), they're probably going to give you a answer they pull out of their butt just to get you off the phone.
 

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+1 to reading the city/county/state codes for yourself. I had a couple of different sources tell me totally different things about transporting firearms in a vehicle, and all of them told me differently from what the actual state laws specify. Take what you hear from "officials" with a grain of salt. It's actually pretty sad how many of them are not fully cognisant of the codes, regulations and laws that they're supposed to be upholding.
 

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Bulk powder is a bigger concern for storage, and if you have over a certain amount it has to be in a special cabinet on rollers so in the event of a fire it can be removed easier. I don't know all the technical info on this just what I remember from reading some others posts on the subject. If you are only talking a couple of thousand rounds I would not worry.
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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Bulk powder is a bigger concern for storage, and if you have over a certain amount it has to be in a special cabinet on rollers so in the event of a fire it can be removed easier. I don't know all the technical info on this just what I remember from reading some others posts on the subject. If you are only talking a couple of thousand rounds I would not worry.
BLACK powder is the real concern and there are strict laws regarding it's storage and handling. Smokeless powder is no more dangerous than any other combustible material (wood, paper, etc.) unless you have truly huge quantities stacked in pile (think a dump truck load).

Certainly a couple of thousand rounds of ammo isn't an issue unless you are in a truly tyrannical jurisdiction and they actually see the stuff. However, in most places thousands upon thousands of rounds of loaded smokeless powder ammo isn't a problem either and it's not really a problem as far as safety, even in a fire, is concerned, regardless of the law.
 

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From what I remember, black powder and bulk primers are the limiting factors, not the amount of loaded ammunition.
 
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