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Blowing it up, it looks like there's a "ghost" of a 3 between the 9 and the 7.
 

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I could see a 3 and I can see a 2........Jezz.. I just can't call it.

Got a lot of history though, it saw WWII and was rebarreled during it,
so it shot / saw some hard service. Maybe France, Dunkirk and got rebarreled
for remainder of WWII. Its a great piece.
 

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Its a No1 MkIII*, almost certainly a common 1917.

The BSA military rifles built in 1920s-1940 (before the Dispersals) were No1 MkIIIs to the inter-war specification, ie no volleys but with a magazine cut-off. These rifles are also in a deep blued finish and nearly always have very sharp and even engraving of the cipher and other details. The rifle in the photos is typical of a refinished WW1 production rifle.

p.s. the rear sight protector is back to front.....
 

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Gosh ! Hard to say from the photos, but I don't see any recess in left receiver sidewall for thumb charger loading ? As Milprilib points out above, key question would be to identify if it has a magazine cutoff. If so, could it be a "1907" MkIII which was upgraded to a MkIII* and rebarrelled in WWII ?
Great buy and a very nice rifle ! Cheers.
 

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RHood,
Check the right hand side of the receiver to see if there is a long slot in the metal approx the length of the bolt opening. The mag cutoffs were a metal plate which were hinged at the fore end of the receiver to swing open or closed across the magazine, so that one could block a round from being chambered, etc...a training thing! While the mag cutoff was typically indicative of pre-war or early WWI rifles, some manufacturers did continue to use stocks of receivers throughout the War which had already been prepared with the cutoff. So, it's not written in stone, especially when cutoffs were resurrected in the 20s, 30s and even into WWII for other reasons, but it is merely an indication of any early rifle.
A similar rifle to yours sold at Auction in Ont. on Saturday for $525, I believe.
 

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Very interesting. Was this a feature of 30's dated BSA's?

Something else interesting I just noted in TLE. Skennerton doesn't list an N prefix for BSA production between 1915-18 but also doesn't list one for production between 1919-39. Am I reading it wrong?
 
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