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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stumbled upon this last night on fleabay. Our good ole buddy from Copenhagen NY mr reisel. I have seen this pattern of officer gunto before, and have seen it labeled as a post war tourist copy.

I thought after the type 3 was introduced in late 1943 that all shin guntos made after that point had the iron fittings and dark ito wrap.

This one is unique to me, because of the blade markings, others that I have seen have no markings.
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I've seen, and owned several of this pattern. Have heard them referred to as "Homeland Defense Pattern". However, none have had these markings. They are usually on another suspect pattern sword. There was one on fleabay, attributed to a China veteran.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've seen, and owned several of this pattern. Have heard them referred to as "Homeland Defense Pattern". However, none have had these markings. They are usually on another suspect pattern sword. There was one on fleabay, attributed to a China veteran.
I know a dealer in NY who has several of these for sale on his website, and he wants like 600 plus for each of them, which I think is a little too much, given the low quality and ratty condition of them.


My concern was years ago I stumbled upon a forum that was discussing this late war pattern, and some felt they were post war copies made to sell to occupation GI's.

I always thought the type 3 Gunto was the last pattern produced. So apparently there was a (sub pattern) produced for home guard use.

I am curious to know what those markings are on the sword, as I haven't these marked either.
 

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These swords, whatever they are, come up for sale on a regular basis. They never sell for more than $400.00. They always have the same "leatherette"-paper composite saya cover.
 

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Does the tsuba on the first sword have a 20 stamen 'plum' blossom instead of the usual 5 stamen 'cherry' blossom?
If it does, it could be like one i came across a while back, the info i got from another forum on it was:
The one stamp looks like 應 the verb ataru, one meaning 'to accept'. I don't know by whom this sword was accepted or OK'd. It does look like Chinese manufacture. 應 in Chinese is not used in the sense of acceptance though.In Chinese it is used as in this sentence " 我們應該去。" (Cantonese) "Ngo ying gai hueh. " " We should go. " Where 應 means 'should'. John
With that type of tsuba it may be of Manchurian construction during the war from what i believe.
I hope someone else can add to this as i would like to know more aswell

 

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I need to back-track a bit. The sword in Panzer's original post, is the same as Stegals'. I have one as well, and owned another. Mine shows signs of long term carry. Having plum, not cherry blossoms, is a definite Chinese/Manchukuo connection. Pierre Cayla had one listed for a long time on fleabay. It had a brass plaque, denoting a gift to a US officer, serving in China. I believe these swords were carried by non-Japanese officers, serving with the Japanese. Just my thoughts. The pair of swords posted by Panzer, are what I've heard called "Homeland Defense". These are the ones that turn up regularly, and sell for less than $400.00. I've owned four or five of those.

I think these "Chinese" swords deserve some research, and closer attention. I have an email in to an expert in the field of Chinese edged weapons. While not Japanese mfg., they have a place in the collections of us foolish enough to collect Chinese weapons. I say foolish, cuz the variety of such is nebulous. With everything being handmade (including the guns) there are no two alike.
 
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Yes, I agree that these 應 marked swords are late war lowered standard swords probably made in China for local and Japanese officers. The Kanji 應 is an older style of the Kanji 応 which is most likely a shortened form of 応急 meaning "emergency", like those similarly 応 marked emergency T-99 rifles.
 

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I heard back from Rudy today. He has one of these also. It has a presentation inscription on the blade. As does pcay's, not a brass plaque, like I previously stated. Undoubtedly, these were made in some quantity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I stumbled upon this last night on fleabay. Our good ole buddy from Copenhagen NY mr reisel. I have seen this pattern of officer gunto before, and have seen it labeled as a post war tourist copy.

I thought after the type 3 was introduced in late 1943 that all shin guntos made after that point had the iron fittings and dark ito wrap.

This one is unique to me, because of the blade markings, others that I have seen have no markings.
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Well this one is up to 520.00 already........and I'm assuming its because of the uncommon blade markings?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I stumbled upon this last night on fleabay. Our good ole buddy from Copenhagen NY mr reisel. I have seen this pattern of officer gunto before, and have seen it labeled as a post war tourist copy.

I thought after the type 3 was introduced in late 1943 that all shin guntos made after that point had the iron fittings and dark ito wrap.

This one is unique to me, because of the blade markings, others that I have seen have no markings.
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Ended at 610.00,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/310924353645?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649
 

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I would venture to guess, that discussion here helped the final selling price. But then, there's that gray blanket...
 
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