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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Instead of hijacking the other thread I thought I would post some comparison photos of two Chinese SKS rifles with laminated stocks, and compare them with two Soviet SKS rifles also with laminated stocks.

First off as you can see one of the Chinese rifles has a blade bayonet, and the other has a spike. The rifle with the blade also has the milling marks on the right side of the bolt carrier common to Soviet rifles.

Both rifles have blued or plumb colored bolt carriers as well as the Cyrillic upside down "U" for the depressed setting on their rear sights. Both also have laminated hand guards. The rifle with the spike was originally fitted with a blade bayonet as the remains of the original groove are still present in the current cutout for the spike.

Both rifles are 26 in a triangle arsenal. the blade fitted rifle has a S/N of 12244900. The spike fitted rifle has a S/N of 9034267. Both of these rifles are all matching with stamped numbers.












Both Soviet rifles are 1950 dated rifles. Both are still blued, and appear to have not been refinished. Both Soviet rifles have hardwood hand guards. Both are all matching with stamped numbers.








Comparing the Chinese VS the Soviet, you can see the stocks on the Chinese rifles are both much darker than the Soviet rifles. If I had to bet I would say the stocks on the Chinese rifles are defiantly of Soviet origin and appear to have been refinished by a non-Soviet arsenal thus giving them the darker color.

I also have two other Soviet SKS rifles with laminated stocks. Both of them are the same color as these two Soviet examples, however are dated 1954 and 1955. These other two rifles are also blue, and the finishes appear to be original.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Chinese rifle have no serial numbers on their stocks, and there does not appear to be any marks indicating any numbers were removed. Both of the Soviet rifles have their serial numbers on their stocks.
 

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you the man

my chinese id to yours. very very nice guns do you have any idea what there worth.i have a very nice offer but i don,t thing i won,t to sell. now i know for sure what i have thank you.
 

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I have been collecting for more years that a lot of folks on this board...never have seen a laminated stock produced by the chinese.......
 

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I do not think the stocks are Chinese but the version is legit, there has been some debate over whether the stocks were made in Egypt or Russia for a while although I believe most now feel they are of Russian mfg. It is a interesting version and I've only seen a few that I'd consider legit examples in all my years of collecting.
 

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Thanks for sharing those photos. First time for me to see PLA laminated stock sks. Thats a beauty, all of them are.
 

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SKS GOD OF GUNBOARDS
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chinese with laminated stocks

both chinese sks carbines that i have seen with laminated stocks had russian stocks and were egyptian rebuilds . many chinese sks carbines from factory 26 were shipped to egypt and the russians supplied parts and possably labor for rebuilding these carbines. one batch came into century years ago these did not all have laminated stocks and were in some cases mixed factory 26 original parts and russian replacment parts. there is no substanciated chinese sks carbines manufactured by chinese with laminated stocks.
 

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Trying to learn as much about my laminated chinese

you guys have a lot knowledge.question mind does not have any import marks. all my other sks have them even my 54 izzy how did they get here
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Either the stamp is extremely light or it just escaped the stamper. You need to check all over your rifle, even sometimes under the wood. During the early recent imports some of the marks were hidden under the wood.
 
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