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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
On John Sheehan's WWI Militaria forum they mentioned that during WW1 the desperate Russians obtained some US Krags from American surplus dealers. It was mentioned that some were on display in a museum in (I think) Petersburg.

I have photos of WWI Russian troops armed with M95 Winchesters, Austrian Mannlichers, Japanese Arisakas and even Italian Vetterlis. I would love to find out more information about these Krags and see some photos. If anyone has some please post it here.
 

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Along those same lines -- Do you know whether the Krag saw combat in SE Asia during WW2 in occupied Phillipines, etc? Surely the Phillipino guerrillas had some Krags still available to them. I've heard of them being armed with more modern US weapons ('03s, 1917s, etc), but I wonder about the Krag. Also, what about guerrilla uprisings in Mexico, Central and South America?
 

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Russian Desperation

I seem to recall that during WWII the US managed to sell some TRAPDOORS to the Russians. I have a relic KRAG M98 barreled receiver that I got from a guy who was in the Philippenes in the late 60's. RETREAD
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's probably certain that some Krags were used by Philippino guerillas early in the war but lack of ammo would have soon led to their replacement with other US rifles and captured Japanese arms. Reportedly all of the Philippine Constabulary carbines that were manufactured were dumped in Manila bay after they were replaced with M1903s after WW1. According to Bruce Canfield, there is not a single, documented P.C. carbine in the USA today. Those you see at gun shows (at highly inflated prices) are the so-called "School Carbines" made up by private firms and gov't arsenals in the 1920s for use by military schools and ROTC programs. Most ended up in Hollywood where they featured prominently in many films made in the 1930s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From my upcoming article on Russian WWI rifles in Man at Arms Magazine:

"Russia’s desperation attracted less than reputable characters to Petrograd (St. Petersburg). Reportedly, a group of “enterprising” American entrepreneurs offered the Russians 400,000 surplus U.S. Krag-Jorgensen rifles. This would have been a good trick being only 475,000 had been manufactured, many of which had been sold off on the American civilian surplus market, while the U.S. government was holding onto the remainder to use as training rifles! But the Russians fortunately declined to tender a down payment and the deal (scam?) never materialized."
 
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I saw pictures of Mexican revolutionaries carrying Krag carbines in the period 1910-29 in the Museo de las Intervenciones in Mexico DF. They were in one of the battles for Juarez, and probably smuggled from the US directly. (They may have been Bannerman cut-down rifles; hard to tell from the bad b/w pix).

From the pictures I've seen in US and Mexican publications and museums, it looks to me like the main "Krag-firing" weapon used by Mexican forces was the Win M95 carbine, tho. Lots of those in pix, altho it is hard to estimate actual use from pix, since any one photographer tended to focus on only one front or battle, not the whole nation. What good pix are left also tend to get re-used in many different displays and publications, so it's easy to get an inflated view of one type of weapon's overall use. I saw the exact same M95 pix in the Museo Nacional del Ejercito and the Casa de Carranza museum in another part of town.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actully, after 1914 the Wilson administration decided to back the government of Presidente Venustiano Carranza and ex-U.S. army weapons, uniforms, supplies and other goodies - including surplus Krag-Jorgensen rifles and carbines - began showing up in the hands of el Ejército de Constitución.
 

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You could PROBABLY say with some degree of certainty that the only place the US Krag saw any kind of official use after WW1 was the Third World. Seems like I read/saw/heard somewhere about Chesty Puller's younger days in Haiti and Nicaragua and the Guardia Civil (Nicaragua) or the Gendarmerie (Haiti) were issued with Krags; references to "Krag-armed local forces" abound in works on the Corps' early days in jungle warfare.
 
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Krag and Dave: interesting stuff! I'm always interested in Latin American use of small arms, just didn't expect info on THIS forum! I had read the same stuff about Krags being issued by the US to "friendly" forces in Haiti and Nicaragua. Possibly in Cuba as well? So far I've never seen a photo of a Krag RIFLE in use in Mexico, just carbines.
 

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We were discussing Mexican use of Krag's several months ago. See this post:

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?181892-Krags-in-Mexico

Like you, I've yet to find a photo of a full length rifle in Mexican service - only the pic of the carbines I posted. I have a book of old photos taken around the time of the Punitive Expedition - no Krags in any of those pics. I'm still looking though:)
 
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