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A collector friend of mine visited Norway & Sweden last year and took these photos. I'm sure somebody here will know where they were taken. I cropped and sized them smaller for the forum. I know the one Krag in the group of 3 appears to be a 1894 Norwegian rifle with a ornately carved stock. The bottom rifle is a Jarmann and the middle a Martini of some type. The other lone rifle was hanging by its sling on a wall. I cropped it and turned it around to see it. I'm not sure what model it is but its pretty.

Not all military rifles look good when they're sporterized. But it seems the Krags look very good even sporterized. I've marveled at that for many years. This photo of the single rifle may not be sporterized. I should get my Krag book out and see. Its a nice looking rifle.

I can see now that this forum is going to be difficult to see the photos every day. I'd have to convert some other firearms in my collection into cash in order to have the bucks to procure a nice Krag but I have them to do if I get the fever bad enough. The problem is I'm not sure which Krag model I'd prefer. I think maybe the 1894 Norwegian long rifle or the U.S. Krag rifle. Those two have the nicest lines to my eyes. I like the long rifles.

Dutchman
 

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"and the middle a Martini of some type"
I believe the middle one is a Krag-Petersson. Very hard to find and very high on my want list.

Regards, John
 

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There is a great book on Norwegian military firearms, the name of which escapes me at the moment. I had the chance to look through Kriggevaer's copy at the Kansas City show last July. The cover photo shows a rifle made by Carl Gustaf (Crown over C logo plainly visible), of a type never used by the Swedish military. Very interesting book even if you can't read a word of Norwegian like me.
 

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There is a great book on Norwegian military firearms, the name of which escapes me at the moment. I had the chance to look through Kriggevaer's copy at the Kansas City show last July. The cover photo shows a rifle made by Carl Gustaf (Crown over C logo plainly visible), of a type never used by the Swedish military. Very interesting book even if you can't read a word of Norwegian like me.
You're probably thinking of Hanevik's "Norske militærgeværer etter 1867". The front cover shows five rifles, second from the top is a Krag-Petersson made at Carl Gustavs Stads Gevärsfaktori in Sweden. This rifle was in limited use in the Norwegian Navy, total Navy production amounted to 975, of which 600 were made in Sweden due to limited production capacity in Norway. Interestingly, the remaining 375 were made at the Navy's main shipyard in Horten (Carl Johans Vern), not at Kongsberg Arsenal. However, Kongsberg did produce 17 Krag-Petersson rifles mainly for further development and international marketing.

Balder

 

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Those pics are of some vey special rifles. These are in the Fram museum in Oslo. These rifles have been on the polar ship Fram, this ship was used for Nansens push towards the North pole and Amundsens journey to the south pole... Also several other research journeys in the arctic and antarctic.
 

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The rifles in the picture are as someone quite correctly mentioned above taken in the "Fram" museum in Oslo.

The top Krag is Fridtjof Nansen's personal rifle, if I'm not mistaken chambered for 45/90 BP. Nansen initially had little faith with the fine calibre smokless cartridges work on large polar animals and had this rifle made especially for the first "Fram" expedition.

The second rifle is as correctly stated above a "Krag Peterson" falling block rifle. This rifle differs from most other falling blocks by the fact that it has a tubular magazine underneath the barrel. When the hammer is cocked, the block falls beneath the tube opening and a shell is fed into the "ditch" in the block. The shooter can then feed it into the chamber either by jerking the rifle hard backwards or pushing it in manually. The Krag Peterson was produced both in Sweden and in Norway (Kongsberg), and only 300 were made at Kongsberg. This makes it so scarce that Hanevik probably had problems finding the real thing for the picture on the cover of his book.

The third rifle is the "Jarman" rifle which despite the fact that it was made in great numbers both in Sweden and in Norway is also very rare. Where all the Jarmans has gone no one knows, but the most plausible explanation is that the german occupants found them in Norwegian magazines in 1940-45 and torched the lot! :-(.

The little Krag that has a picture on its own is not a sporter I believe but a military carbine.

It can be said about the Norwegian krags, that although they were originally military arms, a large number of them were sold off to civilians as "shooting assosiation arms", so that there is no really difference between a military arm and a civil arm when it comes to Krags. The differences are mostly in the markings.
 
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