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Talked to my uncle yesterday and asked him some questions. He told me he was in the 23rd Inf. He got there right in thick of things. Said he was station 22 miles north of the 38th parallel. He carried a M1 Garand and he said in his squad they had 1 BAR. He stayed on the front lines for 11 months. He told me the Chinese start using kids and gave they bold rifles and the regulars used burp guns(maybe pph's) and sks's. I asked him why he was only there 11 months and he said they were on a point system. The more you stayed on the front the more points you got. Once you've accumulated enough points they shipped you home. He has a plaque with all him medals and awards he received over there. I didn't asked him to go into details but he didn't mind telling me what I asked. It was like he wanted to talk about it.
 

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Put a tape recorder in your pocket and get a form from an oral history project to help focus questions - and have another talk with him. Don't push, but try to preserve his account. It is an abiding sadness to me that I didn't have an opportunity to do that with my Uncle Joe the one time he opened up about the Battle of the Bulge and his participation (as a line infantryman) in it.
 

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The tape recorder is a good idea! I did that with Dad & primed him with a couple beers. He spoke of landing black troops from the USS Bowie on some island who were pretty much massacred by the well-hidden Jap. troops.

The fleet then had a good idea where to lay in an effective barrage & white Marines were sent in to much better effect.

He spoke of this on a couple other occasions, but I have not read any published accounts of it. He let on like the back troops had severe casualties. SW
 

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That's one I certainly can't speak to. Don't recall ever hearing of any such incident. Which means i can't recall hearing about it, nothing more. Could probably get a history of USS Bowie and gain some ideas about where you could look for additional information.
 

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He spoke of landing black troops from the USS Bowie on some island who were pretty much massacred by the well-hidden Jap. troops.

SW
USS Bowie (APA-137) was laid down on 28 August 1944 at Wilmington, California, by the California Shipbuilding Corp. under a Maritime Commission contract (MCV hull 53); launched on 31 October 1944; sponsored by Mrs. J. Shaw; delivered to the Navy on 21 December 1944: and commissioned on 23 December 1944 at Terminal Island, California, Comdr. Frank L. Durnell in command.

World War II service

Outfitting, shakedown, and amphibious training occupied Bowie until the second week in February 1945. After post-shakedown availability at Terminal Island, she loaded cargo at the Naval Supply Depot, Oakland, California, and set sail on 20 February for the Mariana Islands. She made a refueling stop at Eniwetok in the Marshalls before arriving at Guam on 10 March. The attack transport completed cargo operations there on 16 March and then moved to Saipan on the 17th to embark casualties. She put to sea for Hawaii that same day and entered Pearl Harbor on 27 March. The ship conducted local operations in Hawaiian waters and engaged in upkeep in Pearl Harbor until mid-April. At that time, she began combat loading elements of the 10th Army bound for duty in the Okinawa campaign.

Putting troops ashore at Okinawa

Bowie stood out of Pearl Harbor on 17 April in a convoy. She arrived off the Hagushi beaches on Okinawa on 10 May. The troops went ashore immediately, and the attack transport began unloading cargo and taking on casualties. During her stay in the Ryukyus, Bowie witnessed a number of air raids but did not come under attack herself. On 15 May, the attack transport left Okinawa in a Hawaii-bound convoy. She made two stops, one at Ulithi and the other at Guam, before arriving back in Pearl Harbor on 3 June. She remained there overnight and, on the 4th, headed for the west coast. Bowie reached San Francisco, California, on 10 June and disembarked the casualties and other passengers. Later in the month, she loaded cargo and took on troops. The ship loosed her moorings on 17 June and stood out of San Francisco Bay. On her way across the Pacific Ocean to the Philippines, Bowie stopped at Eniwetok and Ulithi for fuel. She arrived at Tacloban, on Leyte, on 9 July and began discharging cargo and troops. Five days later, the attack transport headed back to Hawaii.

End-of-war operations

Bowie spent almost two months in the Hawaiian Islands. When not in port at either Pearl Harbor or Honolulu, she conducted rehearsal landings at various locations in the islands. On 1 September, she left Pearl Harbor in a convoy bound ultimately for Japan. She stopped at Saipan to take on fuel and provisions from 13 to 16 September and arrived at Sasebo, Japan, on the 22d. Her troops went ashore on the 24th, and Bowie cleared Sasebo the next day. She took on boats at Subic Bay on 30 September and then moved to Manila. The attack transport moved to Lingayen Gulf on 2 and 3 October and began embarking troops destined for occupation service in Japan. She departed Lingayen Gulf in convoy on 9 October and arrived in Sasebo on the 14th. She did not, however, disembark her passengers until 18 October. On the 22d, Bowie departed Sasebo and proceeded to Guam where she stopped on the 27th. Continuing her voyage that same day, the ship reached San Diego, California, on 12 November.

Post-war activity

The attack transport made a round-trip voyage from the west coast to Guam and back between 27 November and 27 December bringing veterans of the Pacific theater home to the United States. On 16 January 1946, Bowie departed San Pedro on her way to the U.S. East Coast. Steaming via San Diego and the Panama Canal, she arrived in Norfolk, Virginia, on 4 February. There, the ship began preparations for inactivation.

Post-war decommissioning

On 8 March 1946, Bowie was placed out of commission at Norfolk. She was returned to the Maritime Commission on 14 March 1946, and her name was struck from the Navy list on 28 March 1946. She was berthed with the National Defense Reserve Fleet at James River, Virginia, and remained there until 9 April 1973 at which time she was sold to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp., New York City, for scrapping.

Military awards and honors

Bowie received one battle star for World War II service at Okinawa.
 

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Well, that pretty well answers where and when - had to have been Okinawa on May 10th. And i can't fit the described events to anything in any of the histories of the Okinawa campaign I've seen (I find Okinawa of interest beyond most other Pacific campaigns because my Dad and two uncles were all on that island).
 

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Going back to Clyde's comment, my grandfather was at Pearl Harbor on 12/7/41 and served in the Pacific all through WWII and also in Korea. His brother-in-law served in Europe at the Battle of the Bulge, were he was captured. I interviewed both of them and videotaped the discussion. I think if you can get the discussion on video it would be even better than just audio taping it.
 
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