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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
swisswaffen.com: Serial Number Database Search, then enter serial number in search field on the topper left.

Because it's a K00/11, the dating will result in a Kurzgewehr 00 manufactured in 1901. This rifle has been converted to K11 in the years from 1912 to 1920.
Thanks very much for your reply. So the original build date is 1901 or if not, Is there any information or characteristics on the rifle that would help narrow that down?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The serial is actually a P before the 3399. So does that make a difference and was it made for private use or privatized after its service use?

Here’s a photo of my K11 with my 1944 K31.
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The "P" in that location and font indicates privatization (ex-military) rather than private-series (non-military). Also, highest private-series K11 serial was P.2300.

After removing the buttplate, you may be able to observe month and year the stock was made. Since K00/11's received new stocks during conversion, this will give the earliest date it could be completed - though completion might have occurred well after the butt date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I removed the butt plate and there looks like a “16” in the wood. The serial number is on the back side of the butt plate.

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There’s a number on top of the stock. I purchased this from Simpsons LTD. and they thought it was a rack number.

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Private series serials on K11 are stamped like this ("P" preceding the number, dot between P and number, smaller font size, often the name of the selling gun shop is stamped in too):
This example illustrates the hazards of trusting published literature. The serial is clearly higher than the 2300 cited in D.R.d.S..

3798478

What may be going on is that this table covers only 1913-1919 while production continued post-1919. I would have done better to rely on swisswaffen.com -
"The private series of the Modell 1911 Carbine reaches from P.2001 to P.3498. From P.3101 on, private Modell 1911 Carbine were produced from already produced parts, the number of this series is unknown."

The butt date on carbine 3399 looks to me like "I 15" (January 1915).
 

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My 00/11 has the original matching four digit serial still on the stock pieces.

The number stamped on the butt end of the stock indictaes manufacture date in roman numerals for the month followed by the two digit year. Example, XI 15 would be November, 1915.

3798507
3798508
 

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GColloton:

Very nice rifle there! So much of this is about history, and trying to glean insight on just where and what these guns have been through. I hope you had the opportunity to travel to Simpsons directly. It is an experience in itself. Scouring thru the listings, narrowing down the choices, and then having them all lined out on the counter for your inspection is just shopping Valhalla for collecting nerds.

It’s always amazing to break these guns down and see what excellent shape they are in for machinery that is over a century old. Just think of that a minute! It really doesn’t matter if it’s a sewing machine or an airplane...it’s rare indeed to find something so complex in such good order. And to think they were manufactured by skill, a lathe, and a keen eye...truly amazing. No CAD/CAM here, none at all. Damn, electricity was even in it’s infancy if you think about it.

Anyhoo...enough rambling.

I hope you get the opportunity to shoot it soon if not already. Please keep us posted
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
GColloton:

Very nice rifle there! So much of this is about history, and trying to glean insight on just where and what these guns have been through. I hope you had the opportunity to travel to Simpsons directly. It is an experience in itself. Scouring thru the listings, narrowing down the choices, and then having them all lined out on the counter for your inspection is just shopping Valhalla for collecting nerds.

It’s always amazing to break these guns down and see what excellent shape they are in for machinery that is over a century old. Just think of that a minute! It really doesn’t matter if it’s a sewing machine or an airplane...it’s rare indeed to find something so complex in such good order. And to think they were manufactured by skill, a lathe, and a keen eye...truly amazing. No CAD/CAM here, none at all. Damn, electricity was even in it’s infancy if you think about it.

Anyhoo...enough rambling.

I hope you get the opportunity to shoot it soon if not already. Please keep us posted
I wasn’t able to travel to Simpson’s, and I ordered over the phone. I thought that was a pretty unique experience and a solid example of customer service. I’d like to travel there one day.

I haven’t shot it yet, but I’ve got a few boxes of ammo on stand by for when the weather gets nicer on the east coast.

Learning as much of the history of the actual rifle is a lot of fun for me. There is so much knowledge on these forums.

Thanks for writing.
 
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