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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got this in a deal last week along with a pile of other WW2 bring-back vet's goodies. I knew there was a "german rifle" involved so I came right over to meet the guy. Jaw dropped when i saw this unmolested k98 matcher. Thank god the original owner kept it oiled in a gun bag in a decent storage area.

I'm still in awe myself, so i'll just post some pics.


P.S. When i opened the bolt on initial inspection, a round popped out. Had to clear the remaining 3 in it. Let that be a lesson, a firearm sitting in a closet for 50+ years could still have live ammo in it. According to the seller (original owner's nephew), he kept it around for self-protection.
 

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He must have had it apart at some point; the rear band and sling are backwards!

Were the rounds original?

Very nice, though.

PM
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. I'm somewhat hesitant about trying to disassemble it as the front band is REALLY on there and won't move. Don't want to scrathc untouched original wood finish.

And yes, the 4 rounds I ejected were indeed original WW2 8mm mauser.
 

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Just look at the beautiful condition of the screws. I feel weak.

I swear, it seems that 90% of the Mausers I've seen in America were disassembled with ice picks and tire irons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The story i got is that it was in the closet never played with since the 50's. Hence lack of bubba touching the screws. Thank god for small miracles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
NICE SCORE!

What other WW2 goodies did you get??
Thanks mate! As for other stuff, there is a DD Police helmet with 25 year service medal tucked into the liner, Heer pith helmet, HJ Leader parade brocade belt and buckle, NSDAP leader buckle, Heer buckle, SA Dagger, assorted armbands and pins, WW1 iron cross 2nd class and 1914 hussar picture tobacco pipe. Basically a grab bag of bringbacks I have been dreaming about finding lol.
 

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Just out of curiosity, other than by using the 'backwards' sling as an indicator (and it could easily have been put on that way by the same guy thay got the Frosch wrong), how could you tell the rear band is reversed just from the pictures in this thread?
 

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Just out of curiosity, other than by using the 'backwards' sling as an indicator (and it could easily have been put on that way by the same guy thay got the Frosch wrong), how could you tell the rear band is reversed just from the pictures in this thread?
The sling loop on the band should always be on the left side (side opposite of the bolt)...so it being on the right definitely means the band was put on backwards...

Sometimes they are put on right that way, but upside down...one I just picked up was this way, easy to tell, as the s/n is upside down...
 

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A K98 that I recently picked up was quite similar. What I did was wrap a rag around the wood just under the band and then carefully clamped down on the spring with a pair a pliers. From there I just got a piece of wood to put between the band and the stock and lightly tapped the band off with a brass hammer. If you're careful you won't damage anything.
 

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I recently used the method described by student of history to successfully remove a stuck front band on a Yugo m24/47 Mauser

Be careful, thats a beautiful rifle!

EDIT: I agree with MauserGuy85's comment below, I did not use pliers but used a clamp with rubber on the ends and a rag around the whole rifle.
 

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Clamping down band springs with pliers???? No mention of either a cloth or wood piece between the spring and plier? I can practically guarentee that you will scratch something or dig into the wood with the plier grooves.

If your going to be clamping down on Band springs, I highly recommend using a REAL clamp like this. http://homedepot.digby.com/homedepot/product/detail.do?itemId=202214072&categoryId=&path=

Pliers were not designed to be the tool for this kind of job. Sure, you can do it just like you can use a right sized flathead screwdriver to remove a Phillips screw, but it's not the tool for the job. The above linked clamps have very soft synthetic pads that won't harm wood or metal and the pad's size guarentees that the clamping area is sufficiently spread out as to not dent or indent the wood on the opposite side of the band spring.
 

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The sling loop on the band should always be on the left side (side opposite of the bolt)...so it being on the right definitely means the band was put on backwards...

Sometimes they are put on right that way, but upside down...one I just picked up was this way, easy to tell, as the s/n is upside down...
A couple months ago i picked up a BCD 4.. when i got it, the front band was the same way as this one. I quickly switched it around. Probably from when they were disassembled to go into a barracks bag? :)
 

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Clamping down band springs with pliers???? No mention of either a cloth or wood piece between the spring and plier? I can practically guarentee that you will scratch something or dig into the wood with the plier grooves.

If your going to be clamping down on Band springs, I highly recommend using a REAL clamp like this. http://homedepot.digby.com/homedepot/product/detail.do?itemId=202214072&categoryId=&path=

Pliers were not designed to be the tool for this kind of job. Sure, you can do it just like you can use a right sized flathead screwdriver to remove a Phillips screw, but it's not the tool for the job. The above linked clamps have very soft synthetic pads that won't harm wood or metal and the pad's size guarentees that the clamping area is sufficiently spread out as to not dent or indent the wood on the opposite side of the band spring.
He mentions using a rag. I have used that technique as well but also cover the "teeth" of the channel locks with plenty of electrical tape.
 

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He mentions using a rag. I have used that technique as well but also cover the "teeth" of the channel locks with plenty of electrical tape.
A, yes he does. Thanks for pointing that out mto. My apologies student of history, don't know how I missed that part. Still, pliers scare me when used on valuable rifles. One slip and.... Ouch, dollars just vanished ffrom your pocket.
 
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