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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I acquired, IMO, a nice example of a 1941 Johnson Automatic Rifle this weekend, B26xx serial number range. It looks pristine. I can't tell if it is all original or if it was professionally refurbished. The parkerization is flawless as is all the meatal parts. The wood is in excellent condition with only one very small dent on the right side. IMO. the markings are all sharp and clear with no signs of "shinny" metal at the bottomg of the marks. Bore is bright and shinny with no signs of wear that I can see. The chamber looks like it is brand new - there are no wear marks from the bolt fingers rubbing against the locking cuts. The bolt face shows no signs of wear. I am not an expert in being able to tell if a gun has been professionally refurbished, so any help with things I should look for would be appreciated. I paid $5K for it (+ $300 sals tax). I think I got a decent deal on it. Attached are a few pictures... please excuse the poor caryola job on highlighting the markings....


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From the pictures provided that looks like a beautiful Johnson. You need to lose the white filler in the markings, it distorts the finish...but by the finish it is either a pristine example of original park, or very nicely redone. The wood has the right coloring to be original as well. Is the chamber in the white? Is the barrel ring marked ".30-06" and "41"? Don't worry about the numbers matching, it isn't critical. Can you provide some more detailed and closeup pictures?

Well bought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Any markings on the barrel? Should be a couple of numbers.
I'll have to look again. I know it has the 30-06 and '41 on the front of the locking ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From the pictures provided that looks like a beautiful Johnson. You need to lose the white filler in the markings, it distorts the finish...but by the finish it is either a pristine example of original park, or very nicely redone. The wood has the right coloring to be original as well. Is the chamber in the white? Is the barrel ring marked ".30-06" and "41"? Don't worry about the numbers matching, it isn't critical. Can you provide some more detailed and closeup pictures?

Well bought.
White crayon has already been removed. It was my poor attempt at highlighting the markings so I could get a good picture. Not sure what the "listing pros" use, but theirs always seem to really make the markings stand out.
The chamber shows no signs of being blued or parkerized. The locking cut-outs do though. No problem with a No-Go gauge and unfortunately I do not have a bore or chamber runout gauge. I can tell you the a 150gr spitzer (PPU) placed in the muzzel sits right on the oglive if that gives you any indication of the barrel wear.

What other pictures would you like me to post? Be glad to try and get additional decent pictures......
 

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Supposedly very few of these rifles were sent to the Dutch East Indies. They were ordered along with the UD M42 SMG by the Dutch to provide more firepower for their forces stationed in the East Indies, but the Japanese invaded the islands long before these weapons could be shipped there. John
 

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Supposedly very few of these rifles were sent to the Dutch East Indies. They were ordered along with the UD M42 SMG by the Dutch to provide more firepower for their forces stationed in the East Indies, but the Japanese invaded the islands long before these weapons could be shipped there. John
They were returned to the Dutch East Indies after the war.
 

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I would love to see a photo of a Johnson in the Dutch East Indies. The only photos during WWII of a Johnson I could find were in Suriname, a very small Dutch colony in South America. All the other photos I could find after WWII in the Dutch East Indies were of Dutch soldiers with British weapons, SMLE's, Bren Guns and Sten guns (did find one Dutch soldier with an MP40). This makes sense as the British took the Japanese Surender in what is now Indonesia, and just like the first French Forces in Indio China, where the British also took the Japanese surrender in the Southern half of the country, armed both the Dutch and French with their weapons. I have seen photos of Dutch Marines in the East Indies with M1 Garands, BAR's and M1 Carbines, but never of a Johnson. Not saying they were not there, but again would love to see a photo of them. John
 

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It's my understanding that when these rifles were imported in the 1960s (the rifles were returned to the Netherlands) they were all restocked and refinished because of being in the humid Dutch East Indies.

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For those interested, that price for the military-configuration Johnson equates to $623.15 today. So, OP, you'd have done A LOT better buying this in October of 1954...

Only teasing. That's a beautiful rifle. Oh, and the price on the "sporter" in that ad? $1178.07 today, minus the glass.
 

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I did some more looking and found two photos of Johnson's being carried after WWII in the Dutch East Indies, both by local soldiers of the KLIN. All the photos of regular Dutch soldiers immediately after WWII ended were carrying British weapons as discussed above, later it is M1 Garands, M1 Carbines and BAR's. Looks like the Dutch may have considered the Johnson a second line rifle, but with corrosive ammunition and tropical conditions, I doubt that great looking rifle in this post saw service in the Dutch East Indies. John
 
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