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Jensen Stocks
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Topic URL: http://old.gunboards.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=128695


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Topic author: Ronin48
Subject: Jensen Stocks
Posted on: 10/11/2005 10:16:00 AM
Message:
Recently encounterd an article I removed from an Ameican Rifleman some years back concerning Uberti, the fabricator of the early American revolver replicas. In the article he notes as a child he sanded "Japanese Arisaka" rifle stocks at home.(Type "I" no doubt)

Many of the late Jensen 40th series 99 stocks appear to have been sanded, more than normal for any other series. Some of us believe that these were finsihed in home-industry cottages. Only other explanation that comes to mind is that there was a lot of sandpaper on the ship bringing the G. I.s home with 40th series souviners. Comments?​

Replies:

Reply author: War is Peace
Replied on: 10/11/2005 11:23:48 AM
Message:


quote: Originally posted by Eloldehombre1

...Many of the late Jensen 40th series 99 stocks appear to have been sanded, more than normal for any other series. Some of us believe that these were finsihed in home-industry cottages. Only other explanation that comes to mind is that there was a lot of sandpaper on the ship bringing the G. I.s home with 40th series souviners. Comments?



Doss:

I have also observed that almost every example of a late Jensen stock looked "funny" in comparison to the customary appearence of Arisaka stocks. There are often coats of what I assume is shellac. It's hard to describe a typical Jensen stock other than to say that they look similar to each other and different from other Type 99 stocks. They also look different from the random T99 that has simply been refinished here in the States.

Reply author: Francis C. Allan
Replied on: 10/11/2005 11:49:58 AM
Message:
You are correct. My early 40th Series also looks hand sanded under the shellac also, yet I am sure it has not received the Bubba treatment as there is a small crack at the rear barrel band and there is no indication that its sharp edge was sanded down. The stock is very dark also. Another feature of most of these Jinsen stocks.

Frank

Reply author: seinen
Replied on: 10/11/2005 1:24:18 PM
Message:

I guess this could explain the reason why some T-99 Jinsen "Special Substitute Standard" have fullers that give the appearance of having been reshaped by hand sanding. I recently sold one of these T-99s with clearly untouched pistol grip proofs and stock finish but with fuller edges that were shallow and not crisply edged.

C/

Reply author: fingolfen
Replied on: 10/11/2005 4:09:17 PM
Message:
My special last ditch rifle appears to have been heavily sanded... will need to double check the proofs...

Reply author: RickV
Replied on: 10/11/2005 4:46:23 PM
Message:
My Jinsen rifles all have that "sanded", sloppily allpied shellac look to them. You may also want to check for Nagoya -- and possibly other arsenal -- proofs on the metal. I recently examined (completely disassembled) a late -- no s/n, 11th series with Nagoya arsenal mark -- and found every part on the gun had dual proofs -- both Nagoya and Jinsen. I have also seen reject marked stocks from other arsenals on Jinsen rifles. This possibly gives further weight to the theory that Jinsen was a dumping ground for leftover parts from the other arsenals, especially Nagoya and Kokura. Hope this helps.

Rick

Reply author: cartoonist
Replied on: 10/11/2005 5:04:12 PM
Message:
I am selling my Jinsen Series 40 now on auctionarms (matching, but no mum)... I had just assumed that it was sanded, as the finger grooves don't have the customary sharp edges that my other 99's have. Maybe that's the original finish? Maybe I shouldn't have put it up for auction!!

Dave

Reply author: davef
Replied on: 10/11/2005 5:15:18 PM
Message:
late no serieal number 11th with jin proofs...um that belongs on my wall....fits my late nagoya and jin collections.you must send it at once.....My very very early jin has a typical early nagoya color to it ,the rest have the darker tone typical of jinsen.in the midddle ranges 50,000 ish they seem to have a lot more stock chatter at the wrist and finger grooves,my very latest ones(including one with a rejected stock and special marked metal) have stocks on them with the sanded look to them ,but the staining and final fit show it to be japanese/korean sanding not bubba.

Reply author: Ronin48
Replied on: 10/12/2005 1:12:23 PM
Message:
Looks to me like several of us are in agreement that the finish on many late Jensen 99 stocks were the product of 'cottage industries'?

Trey, methinks this should be touched on when you do the chapter on the 40th series.

Reply author: Francis C. Allan
Replied on: 10/12/2005 1:29:41 PM
Message:
I agree with Doss. There seems to be no disagreement on the sanded appearance on these stocks. It is certainly worthy of a comment when covering the 40th Series.

Frank

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A way to test this theory is to see if the stock inspection marks are present and clear on these dark shellaced and sanded Jinsen's. If they are clear and punched through the sanding, then Ronin's theory would seem correct. If the marks are gone or nearly so, I believe that it was post capture sanding and finishing. My guess is, if this is the case, that these Jinsens may have been picked up at the same place and maybe by a ships crew or returning soldiers who did a "group" refinishing with shared materials.
 
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