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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I acquired this rifle before the WorldWideWeb (BWWW), and could not identify it until a fellow cartridge collector/friend of mine came to my assistance. It turned out that it is one of probably several thousand Jarman military rifles that were converted by various Norwegian gunsmiths in the 1920's/30's, and post war up to 1952, as commercial harpoon/line throwing guns. Originally there were about 30,000 Jarmans military rifles (predessor to the Norwegian Krag) produced, and an estimated 21,000 were scrapped by German Occupation Forces during WWII, so there aren't too many of these critters around except probably among this crowd.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarmann_M1884

At any rate, I have a packet of original blank cartridges for the gun, however I still need a harpoon, or two before hunting season begins:) Any assistance would be appreciated.








It's a rather heavy gun, partly because of it's massive, cast Bronze butt plate and I image that it will still kick like a mule, however, I haven't actually fired it because of the lack of ammo. Also, interestingly, all #'s match on this one.


LDHare


PS: Mr. Moderator - If this post is pushing the enevolope, then please feel free to relocate, or delete it as you so desire. LDH
 

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I acquired this rifle before the WorldWideWeb (BWWW), and could not identify it until a fellow cartridge collector/friend of mine came to my assistance. It turned out that it is one of probably several thousand Jarman military rifles that were converted by various Norwegian gunsmiths in the 1920's/30's, and post war up to 1952, as commercial harpoon/line throwing guns. Originally there were about 30,000 Jarmans military rifles (predessor to the Norwegian Krag) produced, and an estimated 21,000 were scrapped by German Occupation Forces during WWII, so there aren't too many of these critters around except probably among this crowd.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarmann_M1884

At any rate, I have a packet of original blank cartridges for the gun, however I still need a harpoon, or two before hunting season begins:) Any assistance would be appreciated.








It's a rather heavy gun, partly because of it's massive, cast Bronze butt plate and I image that it will still kick like a mule, however, I haven't actually fired it because of the lack of ammo. Also, interestingly, all #'s match on this one.


LDHare


PS: Mr. Moderator - If this post is pushing the enevolope, then please feel free to relocate, or delete it as you so desire. LDH
Fine with me. Looks to be a nice one. Anyway I want to see you shoot it with a harpoon.......
 

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This forum is going to be looser than some others so this harpoon gun of yours is just fine. I'm curious what the harpoon looks like.

Dutchman
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Gentlemen: I did try to included it's relationship to the Norwegian Krag in my opening text and thanks for your toleratance.

Dutchman: Go to the wikipedia hypertext included in my original posting, and then you'll see the entire harpoon kit, complete with harpoons and line throwing accessories. It's a good article on the Jarmans and especially on the harpoon variation.
Here it is again:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarmann_M1884


LDHare
 

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Having a lathe & milling machine I look at items like the harpoon and think about replicas. Especially if original harpoons aren't available or useful or too valuable to use. Couldn't be that big a deal. If you come across a good drawing or close up photo let me know.

First day of the new forum and I've already learned something new.

Dutchman
 

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LDHare,
Was the bore changed when it was made into a harpoon gun? Or is it still original with rifling?

Thanks, John
 

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Discussion Starter #9
John:

The bore is mirror smooth, but with shallow rifling evident. I haven't had an opportuntity to view the bore in an unmodified Jarman so I don't know how deep, or shallow the original rifling was. Also, the only rounds I have for this rifle are the blanks in a sealed packet.
I would not be surprised if the gunsmiths that modified these Jarman rifles reamed out the rifling a bit, or perhaps the harpoons had one or more bore guides on their shanks that would tend to ream out (read wear out) the bore you shot it. Good question. I wish I could answer it better.


LDHare
 

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Hi everyone, I have been trying to find out information on this Harpoon Gun for a while now. I own this Harpoon gun in it's original wooden box complete with all it's accessories.It is in unfired condition. I can post some pictures if their is any interest. I would really like to find out it's value as it seems they are very rare in complete form. Thanks.




Click on image to enlarge.
har3.jpg har2.jpg harpoon gun 006.jpg
 

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Krugger - yours is a 52, not a 28. It's a totally different animal based on a mauser action. I have seen a couple of these sell for about $1000 with the box/kit. They were sold to be used, rather than as a collectors item, so I'm not sure what that tells you about the value of yours.
 

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I was on active duty in the navy and recall seeing the break open H&R type line throwing
guns to pass lines from one ship to another during refueling or taking on supplies and ordnance. I have a few of the shell casings WCC 67 Frank
 

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Thanks guys, I paid $600 30 years ago. I thought that maybe being rare, and complete in the box and unfired it might be worth a few million. :)
 

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Nice M28!
Kongsberg Vapenfabrikk is supposed to have converted 1911 Jarmanns into M28. Yours looks like it was originally a Jarmann M1884/87. Some of the harpoon guns were smoth bored, most of them I have seen are still rifled. M28s are often converted back to "full length" military Jarmanns, since a Jarmann is difficult to find, even in Norway, and quite expensive. Somewhere around $5000 (US).
Old replacement barrels are fitted to the action, wood added to the stock. Barrel bands are litterally filed out of a piece of steel. I did such a job once, could post a picture of it.

Hand
 

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Hand, thanks for the response. Do you think this is a 28 or 52? When I get home tonight I will check the paperwork on the back of the gun crate. I think it says 52? No matter what it is, I would love to know more about it and it's value, I don't think there are many like this in it's original box unfired. Even if it's the only one left, there might be a place in a museum over across the pond. I might consider a free donation to such a permanent cause.
 

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krugger3, your harpoon gun is an M52, action is a Mauser 98. There is also a third version, M48- Mannlicher M1895 action. Harpoon guns are often in good shape, stored in their original wooden box protected from the elements. But not always, I have one M28 suffering from "exposure", even the bolt face is corroded.

By the way, as far as I know, when the Danes started working on their new cartridge 8X58RD they received rifles from Norway: Jarmann actions with barrels in the new calibre. Would it be wrong to say that the Danish Krag started out as a Jarmann?

Hand
 

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There is one here in Brisbane...a 1928 type, still with Rifling in good condition. Besides "harpoons" they were also used with Ball for Seal Hunting (for Fur). The heavy Buttplate of cast brass was to aid in clubbing seals which had not succumbed to the ball load ( coup de grace) and for seal pups.

I first handled it some 10 years ago (maybe more,) and made shellcases for the owner to reload.

I have not heard of it since.

Quite a rare piece...the Aussie one probably came off a Norwegian ship docking in our southern Ports ( bordering on the Antarctic (Southern) Ocean). Australia also has an active Antarctic Research organisation. (Danish and Norwegian Ice Ships were leased from time to time.).

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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The preferred method finishing off seals was by the use of the "Hakapik". (As shown at Wikipedia) Just imagine what the rifle would look like clubbing seals. Remember that they where killed by the thousands!
Heavy brass/cast iron but plate is mounted because of the very heavy recoil of these guns.

Hand
 
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