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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this has been covered before but im just curious as to what the japanese did with the weapons they captured. ive heard that they reissued some of the vz.24s they took from the chinese but what about anything they might have captured from the British or U.S. forces? never seen any photographs of japanese soldiers with any American or British equipment. Thanks
 

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They didnt just use captured vz24s they had their own contract. They indeed used captured US british and dutch weapons. There are several known photos of troops with foreign rifles. There is also a passage in Roy Dunlaps "Ordnance Went up Front" which mention that in the later battle of the phillipines campaign, the only source of the prewar US M1 ball (173gr) which he and other felt was superior in preformance, was to capture it back from the japanese, who apparently had taken to using it and anything else available.
 

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I am curious about the captured Garands used to develop the Type 5, in particular the ones rebarreled to 7.7x58. Did the Ordnacne Division simply rehab them like any other tired Garand, set them aside, or scrap them?
 

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Iough old Marine Vet here had a nice custom made sword belt pistol holster combo he took from a guy he killed.

The first shot went thru the holster and dinged a nice colt 38 auto.

It was determined the colt came from a batch that went to the nurses at Bataan.

I talked to another guy who got a pair of consecutuve numberes Colt SAAs out of a backpack.

They also used a bunch of Stuart tanks captured in the Phillipines,

They were so hard pressed later in the war and suffered so much destruction, little photographic evidence exists from their side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Iough old Marine Vet here had a nice custom made sword belt pistol holster combo he took from a guy he killed.

The first shot went thru the holster and dinged a nice colt 38 auto.

It was determined the colt came from a batch that went to the nurses at Bataan.

I talked to another guy who got a pair of consecutuve numberes Colt SAAs out of a backpack.

They also used a bunch of Stuart tanks captured in the Phillipines,

They were so hard pressed later in the war and suffered so much destruction, little photographic evidence exists from their side.
Very interesting. Do you think japanese soldiers would have prefered to use captured weapons over their own or would only use them if they were in dire need of them at the time?
 

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From my reading I have noted that in regards to handguns the Japanese were pretty practical. The officer's who had to order their own guns often went with an American or German sidearms during the interwar years. Mostly .32 acp brownings and the like.


Given that fact battlefield pick ups were most likely welcomed not frowned upon.
 

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Interesting question on the captured Garands. There was an ad in Shotgun News in the early-mid 90s, a Garand "made to look like a Japanese Garand" with a Japanese rear sight and the metal painted black. Price was under $600. Another I wish I'd bought just to satisfy my curiosity about the caliber. If it was rechambered to 7.7 then obviously some made it home with GIs
 

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I read a book regarding the Japanese in the Pacific. Can't recall the title. But there were stories related by Japanese soldies regarding their part in the war. One account was by a Japanese lieutenant who said he would go out and snipe/kill American soliders using an American carbine he had captured.
My guess he used the carbine so it would not alert the Americans when he fired it as it didn't sound like a Japanese gun and would not alert them they were being fired upon. Ray
 

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There was an ad in Shotgun News in the early-mid 90s, a Garand "made to look like a Japanese Garand" with a Japanese rear sight and the metal painted black. Price was under $600. Another I wish I'd bought just to satisfy my curiosity about the caliber. If it was rechambered to 7.7 then obviously some made it home with GIs
The springs would have had to have been changed as well. The Japanese 7.7mm round didn't produce sufficient recoil to operate the action. That's another problem the Japanese designers encountered and were working to resolve as the war ended.

C/
 

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The springs would have had to have been changed as well. The Japanese 7.7mm round didn't produce sufficient recoil to operate the action. That's another problem the Japanese designers encountered and were working to resolve as the war ended.

C/
Simple enough to fix with just a slightly larger gas tap hole in the barrel. The Garand is gas operated, to switch to the 7.7 would only require re-calibration of the size of the hole to the gas cylinder.
 

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A stray shot is going to draw attention-especially if it drops someone, or in the case of a carbine, wounds or just angers the victim.

The trick would be getting away.
That is not too hard in thick bush.
 

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In a combat zone on the line, I'm sure there would have been a lot of shots fired through out the night and no one would probably pay much attention to another one fired from an American weapon except the guy who was shot or someone near by to see where the shot came from. Also easy get away in the dark. Ray
 

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Simple enough to fix with just a slightly larger gas tap hole in the barrel. The Garand is gas operated, to switch to the 7.7 would only require re-calibration of the size of the hole to the gas cylinder.
Sounds simple enough, but it is not often this simple. I dont know all the ins and out, but I do know that there is much more than just port size that must come into consideration.
 

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Sounds simple enough, but it is not often this simple. I dont know all the ins and out, but I do know that there is much more than just port size that must come into consideration.
Agreed. The Japanese copied the Garand springs exactly and found that recoil generated from Japanese 7.7mm ball ammuntion was simply too weak to operate the action.

C/
 

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Sounds simple enough, but it is not often this simple. I dont know all the ins and out, but I do know that there is much more than just port size that must come into consideration.
Actually it is about that simple. the two rounds are close enough that adjusting the size would allow the proper amount of gas into the system or if an adjustable port were used, a la the FAL system, it could be made adjustable.
 

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Agreed. The Japanese copied the Garand springs exactly and found that recoil generated from Japanese 7.7mm ball ammuntion was simply too weak to operate the action.

C/
Recoil has nothing to do with this gas operated system!
 

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Recoil has nothing to do with this gas operated system!
You are correct, recoil has nothing to do with it, but the gas has to overcome the spring. The spring for a .30cal may not be the same as for 7.7. I am sure the japanese would have had it ironed out but they ran out of time. Yes the cartridges are "close" in size, but power is much different, and the .30cal uses alot more powder. The powder could have much different characteristics resulting in different port pressures and how long that pressure can maintained in order to reliably operate the system(how long the bullet stays in the barrel after it passes the gas port) but at the same time not too long or stuff may break. Bent op rods come to mind here. I think the rule of thumb with M1s is to avoid bullets over 180gr without careful experimentation. Opening the gas port is only one possible step toward getting the rifle to operate RELIABLY. The FAL system is not designed to operate 2 different cartridges, just to adjust the system to compensate for ammunition lot differences or manufacturing variances of the weapon itself. I am not here just thumbing my nose and saying your wrong. Just saying that no matter how obvious it may seem to the casual gun enthusiast who gets to enjoy the fruits of millions of dollars of government(s) research 50-70 years later. There is often a whole lot more that goes into a semi auto rifle than drilling a hole into a barrel and piping it to the rear.
 

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Back to the original subject, I would imagine that the steady availability of ammo for the captured weapons would be a stronger indicator of their use than any other reason. This would be the case of any military force.
 

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Mike,
I'm sure they coulda' figured it out, after all, they made the nambu lights run pretty good.
 
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