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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought this as a sportered Nagant rifle (with a cut down no bolt stock) at a very low price and was not expecting much, since said to be mismatching as well. When buying there was very little time and since the price was agreed upon in advance it was only moved from one bag to the next and not looked at. Had little time when coming back home with it, so it sat in the rifle bag a few days until I finally pulled it out. Upon closer inspection it turned out to be way more than I was expecting - not only that it was a Dragoon rifle, but the rear sight calibration suggested that it was an Austrian conversion to 8x50R caliber (what a quick feed with a 8x50R had confirmed). This also explained it being mismatching, since all Austrian 8x50R conversions are mismatching. I then put it in the display next to the other WWI Nagant rifles to my personal surprise notice that I had a 1898 dating M.91 rifle sitting in a Dragoon stock. Hence I pulled both, swapped the stocks to make at least one correct - and was so pleased by the Dragoon that I took the attached pictures.
There are bads on it, someone once tried to clean (?) the barrel tang with an inappropriate tool (I wonder if this was a file?), but the markings are left intact, mainly the blueing was hurt. I wiped it down with as much oil as I could, this only resulted in shiny oil miscoloration next to it which look even worse in the pictures. I might just leave it this way now, unless someone comes up with a better solution ;).

This conversion interestingly has no factory stamp on it on who outcarried the 8x50R conversion (no OEWG, AZF, Berndorf bear, ....). Or do I not recognize another stamp on the converting company?
 

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Nice rifle. I don't see any Austrian factory markings to indicate who did the conversion. I'm looking at photos with my phone, so I might be missing a light stamp which might have been scratched up when the barrel was scratched up. I think JSE might have done conversions too....could be a small JSE marking somewhere.
 

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It might have something to do with the numbering on the rear sight?

I like the handguard, something you don't see every day.
 

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I like it, nice acquisition!

Pat
 

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Very nice rifle. Something I haven't seen before. So, the barrel was bored and threaded to use the larger round? (as I would understand it (8 as opposed to 7.62 (or close enough?)) Forgive if it sounds like a silly question. It seems easier to simply use the original ammunition rather to invest in the time and effort to make a conversion.
 

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Very nice rifle. Something I haven't seen before. So, the barrel was bored and threaded to use the larger round? (as I would understand it (8 as opposed to 7.62 (or close enough?)) Forgive if it sounds like a silly question. It seems easier to simply use the original ammunition rather to invest in the time and effort to make a conversion.
Sure I read somewhere that the bore was left standard, the 8mm bullet that was used had a soft lead core that would extrude out of the open base of the bullet as it squeezed down the bore.
 

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Sure I read somewhere that the bore was left standard, the 8mm bullet that was used had a soft lead core that would extrude out of the open base of the bullet as it squeezed down the bore.
The barrels were initially rebored. I have posted this excerpt from Heino Hintermeier's book several times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know there are claims for rifles where only the chamber got enlarged to 8x50R and barrel left 7.62, but through all the years I've never seen one of those conversions and everyone keeps talking on them. Maybe there were just a few, maybe all of them were scrapped. However, they are a bit a unicorn: everyone talking on them, no one ever seen one.
 

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Bought this as a sportered Nagant rifle (with a cut down no bolt stock) at a very low price and was not expecting much, since said to be mismatching as well. When buying there was very little time and since the price was agreed upon in advance it was only moved from one bag to the next and not looked at. Had little time when coming back home with it, so it sat in the rifle bag a few days until I finally pulled it out. Upon closer inspection it turned out to be way more than I was expecting - not only that it was a Dragoon rifle, but the rear sight calibration suggested that it was an Austrian conversion to 8x50R caliber (what a quick feed with a 8x50R had confirmed). This also explained it being mismatching, since all Austrian 8x50R conversions are mismatching. I then put it in the display next to the other WWI Nagant rifles to my personal surprise notice that I had a 1898 dating M.91 rifle sitting in a Dragoon stock. Hence I pulled both, swapped the stocks to make at least one correct - and was so pleased by the Dragoon that I took the attached pictures.
There are bads on it, someone once tried to clean (?) the barrel tang with an inappropriate tool (I wonder if this was a file?), but the markings are left intact, mainly the blueing was hurt. I wiped it down with as much oil as I could, this only resulted in shiny oil miscoloration next to it which look even worse in the pictures. I might just leave it this way now, unless someone comes up with a better solution ;).

This conversion interestingly has no factory stamp on it on who outcarried the 8x50R conversion (no OEWG, AZF, Berndorf bear, ....). Or do I not recognize another stamp on the converting company?

Here is it's sister rifle Dave, 1914 Izhevsk Dragoon, the stock shows signs of Austrian sling mounts, post war disposed to the Finns.

3859110

3859111

3859112

3859113

3859114

3859115
 
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