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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have picked up several 91/30s over the last few months and would like to share them with my fellow board members and will start with this one first. This nice 1938 Izhevsk seems to have matching numbers. I remember reading somewhere where that sometimes small parts were recycled for new production. The Burt plate has an old number lined out and the new one slightly above the old one. Is a case of a recycled Burt plate? Or is this a Finn renumber? Rifle has a strange wood repair in grasping groove which is kind of soft and gummy. Unfortunately missing the cleaning rod and no cartouche a visible. Did come with nice sling though.
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Really nice Finn m9130. I believe original matching. Surely the buttplate is Russian recycled, but not from refurbishment. The font is identical looking to me. Let's see what the teachers say. I'm a student. Let's see if the stock is original. They will tell us. If so, you have one fine acquisition.
Thanks.
 

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Hello,

I have about 20 Mosins comprising 5 different models. This is not a Finn 91/30. This is a "Finn Capture" Russian Izhevsk 91/30. Finn captures are desired by many collectors. The Butt Plate does not have a matching Font. Just compare the 3's, and you will see a big difference in the center part. The Butt Plate is not factory for this rifle, and is forced matched, probably by the Finns.. This not that bad though. The Bolt and floor plate are matching.

The stocks are not numbered, so you cannot tell if it is original. You can tell if it has been sanded, and the Russians put a refurb mark on the right butt-stock if it has been replaced. If the Finns replaced it, it should have a Finn spliced stock. I would assume it is original from the pics I saw.

This a nice gun and a relatively rare year. You should pick up a cleaning rod up. They are very cheap. If this gun has a nice bore, all the better. Bore condition is important to MANY collectors, including myself..
 

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Very nice, and valuable as a near factory match. But I agree. The buttplate is not original, and fonts do not match.
 

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Nice rifle, factory original bolt is always a plus. Stock wouldn't necessarily be spliced if replaced by Finns, they reused 1-piece Russian stocks as well.

Now take it to the range and run some rounds through it!
 

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I can't recall ever seeing an instance of a Finn re-numbered buttplate tang. I would think it was repair work done in the Soviet Union prior to loss in Finland? Very nice, collectible rifle.

Ruprecht
I would agree, very doubtful that the Finns renumbered the buttplate. Other than bolts, I don't recall ever seeing an instance of them force matching parts on a 91/30. As mentioned above, it was probably force matched by the Soviets prior to loss.

Still very nice to find a near-miss factory matching Finn capture.
 

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Pull the action out and see if stock is original to the rifle. Mismatched buttplate often means that the whole stock was replaced. Mosin buttplates are not known for being fragile pieces needing frequent replacement.
 

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Pull the action out and see if stock is original to the rifle. Mismatched buttplate often means that the whole stock was replaced. Mosin buttplates are not known for being fragile pieces needing frequent replacement.
Mosin stocks aren't usually numbered on the inside. Just trying to understand how pulling the action out would tell you if stock was original. Even if tang stamp was imprinted in wood it just means it's been together a long time.
 

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Pull the action out and see if stock is original to the rifle. Mismatched buttplate often means that the whole stock was replaced. Mosin buttplates are not known for being fragile pieces needing frequent replacement.
Happens more than you think. I have a new old stock, otherwise factory matching (including bayonet) 1943 Izhevsk that had the buttplate replaced at some point. My guess is because of corrosion from sitting upright in a rack where the floor got wet, etc.
 

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I think we all agree that the buttplate was replaced by the Soviets before it was captured by the Finns.

The matching bolt and magazine are more than most expect to find with a Finn capture. So, in my estimation, it's a very good thing and I would like it a lot. I would.
 

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Mosin stocks aren't usually numbered on the inside. Just trying to understand how pulling the action out would tell you if stock was original. Even if tang stamp was imprinted in wood it just means it's been together a long time.
Mosin stocks are not numbered, but if you pulled enough of them apart you'd be able to tell, not a 100% of course. The same with buttplate-to-stock fitting. Factory fitted original buttplate is usually pretty easy to tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks all for the replies! When I saw this rifle, I was kind of on the fence over the buttplate, but hey, it beats those refurbed rifles so I had to buy it!! I have a couple of more Finn Captures similar to this one that I will be sharing over the next few days.
 

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Happens more than you think. I have a new old stock, otherwise factory matching (including bayonet) 1943 Izhevsk that had the buttplate replaced at some point. My guess is because of corrosion from sitting upright in a rack where the floor got wet, etc.
If it were rusted that bad, there would be some sign of the water damage to the stock. Especially around bottom screw hole. Did you take it off to check by any chance?
 
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