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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is my 1895 Imperial Tula Finn-capped M91, and is also my first Mosin that I got about a month ago!



  • It has the "Ka3" on the Sestroryetsk rear sight leaf but it is an 1895 Tula.. I know that the Konovalov sight is an update in itself, and whether the Finns or the Russians put it there is a mystery to me.. Anyone know..? I would think this was a Dragoon or a Cossack rifle but it does not have the "Ka3" on the barrel shank, but the shank also has a longer serial number than I have seen on similar aged Imperial Russian rifles..


  • The barrel is about 28 & 3/4" from the muzzle to the end of the barrel shank.


  • The front sights are those of a cossack or dragoon barleycorn style. The rifle's overall length is 50 15/16" or 51 1/4" if I measure from the muzzle to the top edge of the buttstock.


  • There is also a "1" on the barrel in front of the rear sight and a "1" with a dot next to it underneath the buttplate. I really wanted to tear this rifle down to look at the receiver tang, but it has those tiny barrel band retaining screws that won't allow them to slip past and about every screw on this gun looks like it's been beat to hell 100 years ago and impossible to take off (it's a joke I think the stock is only 80 years old xD).


  • How much is this rifle worth in todays market? I recently got it from an auction and it is my first Mosin.. After I bought it I couldn't resist and I bought an M39!



  • It also has a buttstock cartouche that I can't identify and a 27 on the buttplate.



  • If anyone could help me identify what the "1" means under the buttplate or any of the other markings it would be much appreciated!



By the way this is my first post. I hope I can get more feedback than the last forum I joined. :)

Sorry for the crappy pictures!! My camera skills are the opposite of good.



Thanks!
 

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Not a Dragoon or Cossack, but instead an M91. It was rebuilt by the Finns after WWI surplus purchase in the 1920's.

It does have a Dragoon marked rear sight, as well as the usual mix of other parts. The stock is Finn-built, and the cartouche is a maker's mark.

Nice looking rifle, and if the tang date on the underside of the receiver is also 1895, then it would be an antique. These are typically selling from $400 - $550.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. And yeah I don't want to look at the tang because I have to take those super small barrel band retaining screws out and they're all marred up as it is I don't want to risk the handguard or something flaking apart either. Maybe I can ID the receiver without taking it apart somehow.. There are a few markings on it that have been partially scrubbed..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not a Dragoon or Cossack, but instead an M91. It was rebuilt by the Finns after WWI surplus purchase in the 1920's.

It does have a Dragoon marked rear sight, as well as the usual mix of other parts. The stock is Finn-built, and the cartouche is a maker's mark.

Nice looking rifle, and if the tang date on the underside of the receiver is also 1895, then it would be an antique. These are typically selling from $400 - $550.
Any idea what the "1" underneath the buttplate means?
 

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Thanks. And yeah I don't want to look at the tang because I have to take those super small barrel band retaining screws out and they're all marred up as it is I don't want to risk the handguard or something flaking apart either. Maybe I can ID the receiver without taking it apart somehow.. There are a few markings on it that have been partially scrubbed..
That stock looks like a postwar rebuild to me--shouldn't be any issues with taking it down. The little band retaining screws are very short and if you're careful shouldn't present too much of a problem. The bands work the opposite way you'd expect (right to loosen them--you'll see how they work the moment you start on them).

The only places it will be dated are the receiver and the barrel. It would be surprising for the receiver to be significantly newer than the barrel, but stranger things have happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That stock looks like a postwar rebuild to me--shouldn't be any issues with taking it down. The little band retaining screws are very short and if you're careful shouldn't present too much of a problem. The bands work the opposite way you'd expect (right to loosen them--you'll see how they work the moment you start on them).

The only places it will be dated are the receiver and the barrel. It would be surprising for the receiver to be significantly newer than the barrel, but stranger things have happened.
The finger splices are rounded - so I'm pretty sure it's a wartime stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That stock looks like a postwar rebuild to me--shouldn't be any issues with taking it down. The little band retaining screws are very short and if you're careful shouldn't present too much of a problem. The bands work the opposite way you'd expect (right to loosen them--you'll see how they work the moment you start on them).

The only places it will be dated are the receiver and the barrel. It would be surprising for the receiver to be significantly newer than the barrel, but stranger things have happened.
Sorry for the crappy picture but this is the only pic I have at work of the splice.
 

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Martin08 knows his stuff and has pretty much nailed your rifle as to what it is and the changes made. I might add the butt plate may have been on a M28 or CG rifle as many had the last two digits stamped on the butt plate, but reality is that is a guess. Best we can do is speculate much of the time unless more conclusive pointers surface. Agree your stock is war time replacement or earlier, don't recall when the splicing started? Also agree that is a nice looking rifle. If you really want to take the rifle apart I wouldn't worry about the small band stop screws, but as already mentioned be careful to turn the band screws correctly as if you force them they will break, just remember the screws are reversed for tightening and loosening. Like most gas lines or acetylene regulator/tank threads are. Thanks for sharing the pictures and well thought out questions, welcome. Regards, John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Martin08 knows his stuff and has pretty much nailed your rifle as to what it is and the changes made. I might add the butt plate may have been on a M28 or CG rifle as many had the last two digits stamped on the butt plate, but reality is that is a guess. Best we can do is speculate much of the time unless more conclusive pointers surface. Agree your stock is war time replacement or earlier, don't recall when the splicing started? Also agree that is a nice looking rifle. If you really want to take the rifle apart I wouldn't worry about the small band stop screws, but as already mentioned be careful to turn the band screws correctly as if you force them they will break, just remember the screws are reversed for tightening and loosening. Like most gas lines or acetylene regulator/tank threads are. Thanks for sharing the pictures and well thought out questions, welcome. Regards, John.


Thanks a lot for all your guys help and thanks for the warm welcome! Lot more insight on this than the previous forums I've visited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was a little dissapointed earlier yesterday - I had taken apart my 1943 wartime SAKO M39 for the first time and examined the tang.. It's a sestroryestk but it's dated 1915 :( I guess it wouldn't have been an antique anyway considering the barrel shank is dated 1943..
 

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I was a little dissapointed earlier yesterday - I had taken apart my 1943 wartime SAKO M39 for the first time and examined the tang.. It's a sestroryestk but it's dated 1915 :( I guess it wouldn't have been an antique anyway considering the barrel shank is dated 1943..
Barrel shank date has no correlation with tang on Finns. It's really luck of the draw. With a trained eye you can spot certain receivers without taking the rifle apart, usually from the crests if they are present. I have a 1968 M39 on an 1898 receiver for example. A few other antiques as well.
 

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Are there M91 stocks with square splices?

I've seen the unissued M91 refurbs (with round finger splices) referred to as "post war," at least partly on the strength of their condition.

My B-Barrel M91 has a round jointed stock and those are all supposedly post war.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Are there M91 stocks with square splices?

I've seen the unissued M91 refurbs (with round finger splices) referred to as "post war," at least partly on the strength of their condition.

My B-Barrel M91 has a round jointed stock and those are all supposedly post war.

There are post war refurbs that still have the wartime stock, but you can usually tell by the condition of the rifle. My 1943 M39 has a wartime finger spliced stock and but was re-arsenaled during/after 1956 when they added the butt-stock rear splice that goes vertical through the end of the butt. The cool thing is they left the round finger wartime stock on the rifle and added the rear butt splice and re-finished the wood but you can still see big gouges beneath it. There are prewar/wartime rifle never used, or could have been put together from leftover parts that they never used.
 
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