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Discussion Starter #1
I've had them for years-shot a lot of deer and a couple of black bears-all one shot kills and nothing went far-maybe 20 yards max.I am still using the old ''Century'' 139 gr ammunition I picked up for $10 a box when the sporting goods store closed up.My kid went on a alpine hunt a few years ago and picked up a couple of boxes of good stuff- bonded bullets for elk and mule deer.Last weekend I was at the gunshow and got a couple of boxes of Norma 156 gr ammunition-that looks good for moose or bear if I want something a bit heavier than my 139 gr stuff.I also got a box of ''reloads''with 85gr sierra bullets-looks to be something that would be ideal for coyotes-I googled the load and powder charge on the box and found it was pretty close to the ballistics of a 22-250.

thinking it over-doesn't that make the 6.5x55 swede about one of the most versatile rifles there are out there?-its accurate and low recoil and hits where I point it.With the appropriate loads,its good for coyotes right up to moose.Not bad for something over 100 years old,either.I've got two with M-8 4x leopolds and one that I bought just for the Helqvist receiver sight-scarce as hens teeth.
 

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thinking it over-doesn't that make the 6.5x55 swede about one of the most versatile rifles there are out there?-
It is a truly versatile round, but you don't need us to tell you that. It is capable of taking almost any game and is truly under-appreciated.
 

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A couple of months ago our club secretary treated himself to a nice new Tikka T3 in 6.5x55 to replace his historic M96. Using a handload that he knew worked well in another club-member's identical rifle, he loaded up ten rounds, brought the whole shebang along, and fire them off. the result was two raggedy holes - each with five rounds through it.

The following week he repeated the exercise, this time with fifty rounds, and let a few of us try it out. Apart from the fact that they were in different places on the target - he is a leftie and there are, as yet, no leftie Tikka's or SAKO's here in yUK - and we are all right-hand shooters, we all, to a man, repeated his raggedy hole five-shot groups.

I've never met anybody who does not shoot a 6.5SE without saying something positive about it, and many in our club are moving over to it from .308Win, the previously most popular GP cartridge.

I only used this calibre against live game once in my life, and dropped a poorly elg up in Normark many years ago right where it stood. The 3/4-on shot at about 75m - a Norma 140gr BT - did exactly what it said on the box. The elg weighed out at a little over 1100 pounds.

Sure, shot placement counts for 99% of all good kills, but a flat-shooting and effective bullet is what makes it so successful no matter whether it is meat or paper that you shoot at. It truly is a magical calibre.

tac
CG #896
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the interesting thing is Remington came out with the .260-a virtual clone of the 6,5x55 albeit in a short action but it offered so little in the way of improvement over the original 100 year plus cartridge,it looks like it may well be dropped from the line up.
 

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I think that the 6.5x55 Mauser cartridge, along with the 7x57 Mauser cartridge comes very close to being a cartridge for the all-around-rifle for up to the larger Game animals such as Moose or Elk. Certainly with the appropriate loads it will take Varmints or large Bears, but there are much better cartridges for these purposes.

In the Varminting Class, the .22 and .24 calibre cartridges are generally more accurate, and certainly more economical to shoot, especially when you are in the middle of one of our Prairie Dog Towns here in the West. And after more than 25 years of hunting experience in Alberta and B.C., I have great respect for anything that can eat me, so I would prefer a larger and heavier rifle calibre there, where you can have a Bear encounter of the worst kind. (Please - do not start another "Bear Defence" thread here.)

But, the 6.5x55 is one of the best cartridges for MOST of our hunting here in North America.
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Discussion Starter #7
''I have great respect for anything that can eat me''and thats exactly why I bought the 6,5X55's big brother,the 9,3x57 loaded with 286 gr soft nosed Privi Partizans-''just in case'' when I'm moose hunting....I want something with ''thump''-the proverbial ''hammer of Thor''-its not moving fast, but neither are freight trains
 

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No. The .30-06 still owns that category. The 6.5 Swede works on Moose but so does the .30-30 and they both do about the same thing. They punch a hole through both lungs and within a couple minutes the moose expires. That's great if you don't mind skinning out your moose underwater. I always feel it's best to drop a moose close to where he stands which is usually a lot more convenient than where he'll run to after you hit him with a light gun. I shot a moose with a .30-30 and I learned from it. I no longer hunt moose with less than a .30-06.
 

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I think that the 6.5x55 Mauser cartridge, along with the 7x57 Mauser cartridge comes very close to being a cartridge for the all-around-rifle for up to the larger Game animals such as Moose or Elk. Certainly with the appropriate loads it will take Varmints or large Bears, but there are much better cartridges for these purposes.

In the Varminting Class, the .22 and .24 calibre cartridges are generally more accurate, and certainly more economical to shoot, especially when you are in the middle of one of our Prairie Dog Towns here in the West. And after more than 25 years of hunting experience in Alberta and B.C., I have great respect for anything that can eat me, so I would prefer a larger and heavier rifle calibre there, where you can have a Bear encounter of the worst kind. (Please - do not start another "Bear Defence" thread here.)

But, the 6.5x55 is one of the best cartridges for MOST of our hunting here in North America.
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Outstanding for Texas animals also.
fwt2.jpg
6.5x55 (classic action) on top
7x57 below
Win Fwts
Here is a pic of 'load dev' on my Swede - my typical deer load here is IMR 4350 over 160 gr rn. works
r 042 target.jpg
 

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No. The .30-06 still owns that category. The 6.5 Swede works on Moose but so does the .30-30 and they both do about the same thing. They punch a hole through both lungs and within a couple minutes the moose expires. That's great if you don't mind skinning out your moose underwater. I always feel it's best to drop a moose close to where he stands which is usually a lot more convenient than where he'll run to after you hit him with a light gun. I shot a moose with a .30-30 and I learned from it. I no longer hunt moose with less than a .30-06.
30-30 is basically your 7.62x39.
As a former SKS collector, former commie (thus AK and Dragunov experience) and a current owner of a pair of 30-30 winchester 94s - these do not come close to my swedes. Sorry, they just dont. even with a 154gr SP in my SKS I would not attempt a 600m shoot at anything, let alone larger game. Basically my take on this: 6.5x55 has less noise, less recoil, flatter round, and with a 156 or 160gr bullet, its just fine for ANYTHING; 30-06 is more available, leaves bigger hole, higher fps on exit, however, I find it less accurate, much heavier on my body (recoil) and an overkill for most applications. at 600yrs, you get a 20" drop via swede and 60" with a 30-06. imagine what shoots better with cross winds and changing weather conditions? just saying.
 
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