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Based on a very limited sample, I have noticed the following regards to cartridge feeding reliability in some M96 and 98 Mauser rifles. It seems that so long as the extractor doesn't bind in any way on the cartridge head, chambering reliability may be controllable to some extent by bolt cycling speed. I noticed this at the range bench with some rifles with more than 1 cartridge in the magazine. When slow cycling the bolt I would get bullet noses jamming against the barrel shank even when COL to spec. Under the same conditions, but cycling the bolt forward as fast as possible, the cartridge would align, feed and chamber correctly. I just may have missed some basic truth about these rifles so am looking to the broader and deeper experience in this forum for further information regards to cycling speed. I know cartridge feeding problems in Mausers can be very complex.
 

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Any cartridge should feed right, no matters the feeding speed. What you encounter seems like a ramp configuration thing. Also, some bullets need to be seated shorter than the max OAL so they feed right. When you feed these cartridges, look at the ogive engagement on the ramp, it will tell you right away if they're too long. Fedding at high speed may cruch or deform the bullet nose.
Sometimes, such feeding problems may also be related to the extractor tension (too much tension, usualy) on the rim groove.
 

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Baribal is right, they SHOULD feed regardless of speed, but what you describe is very common with Mausers, especially in my experience, military Mausers. Slow bolt speed may result in jamming. It shouldn't, but sometimes does, especially with very blunt bullets in a variety of calibers.
 

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When you say M96 and 38 I'll assume you're atlking about military rifles.

You have to remember that military rifles were built to spec. Amongst other things they were designed to work with a specific cartridge.

A very good example of this can be seen in various 8mm Mausers. They will feed surplus ammo without a hitch yet try to feed some factory Remington ammo. Now, take a Husky sporter, either 96 or 98 derived, and that same Remington ammo will feed. It has to do with the feedrails, feed ramp, and ectractor. They all interact.

Best thing if shooting milsurps with reloads is to try to emulate the milsurp ammo as best you can. That will typically yield best results.
 

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Many forget or don't know that military Mausers were originally designed around long, round nose bullets, not the pointy ones we see in surplus ammo today. The design wasn't changed for the pointed bullets, rather the new pointy rounds were just used the in the same rifle already issued. As Baribal stated; they should feed any bullet design in the original cartridge if the OAL is adjusted to the particular bullet.
 

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some times dirt and crud, varnished oils behind the extractor face interferes with proper grasping and holding the shell steady along its travel to the chamber add a loss of tension of spring mentioned and or sharp Spurs from use and those problems will happen with the best 98 / 96 actions feeding. <><dk
 
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