Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Silver bullet member
Joined
·
499 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hope this question has not been asked to death as it has been a while since I have been on this forum but...

A neighbor of mine gave me a Ljungman 42B... (yes gave me, his wife wanted it out of the house)

Despite my familiarity with may types of bolt action and semi-auto firearms, this thing kind of scares me... I'm afraid of losing a finger!

Can y'all point me to some info on disassembly, etc?

I tried running some dummy rounds through it but could not get it to eject properly... I've read about the 2 miles this thing throws brass, so thought I was not moving the bolt w/ enough force....

Anyway, any info is appreciated!!

M.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Remove the magazine. Slide the rear cover forward an inch, turn the saftey halfway between safe and fire and pull it up and out, then sloooooowly let the rear cover come off as it's under some spring pressure. You can then pull the bolt carrier and bolt out to the rear also. This will **** the hammer also, or pre-**** it now and that makes removal of the bolt easier. This is also the time to test the ejector with an empty case to see if it works. Don't take the trigger guard off unless you have too.

When the rifle is assembled never put your fingers anywhere near an open bolt, instead remove the magazine, push the rear cover forward 1/2 inch, put the rifle's safety on fire and smartly move the rear cover back and the bolt will close. When firing it will close just like this with the magazine inserted.

No need to lube cases. I use IMR 4320 powder with an 139 grain bullet. This seems to be much smoother on the rifle and shoulder than a faster powder.
 

·
Silver bullet member
Joined
·
499 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input so far... does the Ljungman trash brass as bad as I have heard in the past?

Thanks again!

M.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
ljungman

The Egyptian Hakim is knockoff of the ljungman and although it's been a while since I've shot it. I want to say that yes it dings every case it ejects, and it throws spend cases a good distance. You can usually reload the cases you just have to full length size.

me26245
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
While you don't have to lube cases first, I have found that lubing them lightly cuts down alot on the tear marks on the rim of the case. Without the lube, my Ljungman will take quite a chunk out of the cases. Lubing the cases just seems to work better for me...
 

·
Moderator / Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
2,661 Posts
The military practice of lightly oiling cases was due to the powder burn rate of the m/41 ammo being too slow for the gas system so instead of having a manufacturing alteration of the ammo they just recommended oiling the cases slightly to facilitate extraction.

Slow powders in gas guns are dangerous due to the port pressure being too high when the bullet passes the gas port. The danger of this is in the violent extraction tearing the rim open and dumping huge amounts of gas pressure into the action. Many *experts* say this problem, as with the Hakim, is due to firing out of battery but that just isn't factual. Its a burn rate problem. I've personally witnessed a Hakim rip a rim open and blow the magazine out of the rifle and destroy the stock and magazine in the process.

Handloaders can eliminate this problem by chosing faster powders and experimenting with the understanding of the problem.

The Ljungman Ag42b can be the most dangerous firearm in the world if you value your fingers and thumbs. It makes Garand thumb look like a stubbed toe. You are wise to fear the Ljungman. It is a rifle worthy of fear:).

Dutchman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
I've seen some photos around this forum of a Ljungman that also failed and fell apart with a shattered stock. I always wonder about that every time I pull the trigger but I haven't seen any problems as of yet on mine (but I use mild to average pressure loads and non-oiled cases.) I have a stash of primed Swedish military brass and just load that up and then skip trying to reload the berdan cases. My fired cases aren't dinged up though, my Ljungman's rubber bumper seems to prevent that, unlike the Hakim which murders the cases.

Anyway, I test each load beforehand to be sure it chambers completely, my guess is any blow ups are due to a cartridge not completely chambering. I've tried several powders, my favorite powder in most loads for other rifles is 4895 but it seems too violent for the Ljungman while the 4320 seems just right. Each rifle can vary though.
 

·
Silver bullet member
Joined
·
499 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I've got a battle pack of the prj m/41 surplus I was going to use in it, but maybe not such a good idea?

Dutchman, I am very fond of my fingers and thumbs...

Now I'm considering putting it on the trader...

I've heard really great things about their accuracy...

?

M.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
Now I'm cornfuzed. Slow powders creeat hight port pressure. Right?

montello: I've tried several powders, my favorite powder in most loads for other rifles is 4895 but it seems too violent for the Ljungman while the 4320 seems just right. Each rifle can vary though.
Isn't 4320 slower than 4064?
4895 a faster powder with a lower ports pressure to violent? Wouldn't a reduced load of 36g of 4895 be better that the slower 4320?

This makes my head hurt.
.....MJ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
While I can't comment on the lubed case issue, I believe if you are trying to familiarize yourself with the rifle then here is a decent place to start.
http://www.surplusrifle.com/hakim/index.asp
This is of course for a Hakim, but as it was mentioned before the Hakim is a knockoff of the Swede. It also has a great takedown procedure with pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Here is the load I was given for my Ag42b and it works great in my rifle, a Excellent to Mint example I purchased from Dana Jones.

I started off at a 34 grains and lubed the cases while I worked up the load to the recommended max load of 37gr. After the max load cycled well I started over at 34 grains without any lube on the cases and everything still worked great. It is a accurate load in my rifle but I have yet to shoot it over my Chrony.

This load was worked up by a well known member of this forum who lives in the NW USA

Nato #34 Primers.......VERY IMPORTANT......you don't want a slam fire.
140 grain Sierra Game King or Match King
Reloader 15......37 grains max load
I used FNM boxer cases.

Smokepole50
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Now I'm cornfuzed. Slow powders creeat hight port pressure. Right?

montello: I've tried several powders, my favorite powder in most loads for other rifles is 4895 but it seems too violent for the Ljungman while the 4320 seems just right. Each rifle can vary though.
Isn't 4320 slower than 4064?
4895 a faster powder with a lower ports pressure to violent? Wouldn't a reduced load of 36g of 4895 be better that the slower 4320?

This makes my head hurt.
.....MJ....

IT's not that complicated I hope, the loads with 4895 create a violent recoil in the Ljungman but using 4320 I can get a higher velocity and the rifle runs much more smoothly and tames the recoil. Ejection with both powders is the same. Perhaps in a minor way, but I can tell that the rifle is pushing my shoulder instead of slapping it which is less chamber pressure but possibly similar port pressure.

I can get max loads of 2400 fps with 37.7 gr of 4895 or 2500 fps with 39.7 gr of 4320. This seems to show a higher port pressure with 4320, but the rifle really likes it and the cases show less primer flattening and high pressure effects, (chamber pressure=boom), due to a smaller pressure spike. I don't have acess to original Swedish powders but I think I'm close to what the rifle was intended to use performance-wise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Montello,

The problem with loads for the Ljungman isn't high or low pressure but burn rate. Even the powder used in the m/94-41 Swedish Military ammo was too slow burning for correct timing of the Ljungman action. I would think that any powder with a burn rate equal to Reloader 15 would work as well. You'll also note in smokepoles post that J-I-O used #34 NATO primers. I've never used these primers but by his experience I would say they are a hard primer...Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Yes to that, I use the #34 primers in all my semi-auto reloads as they are harder, to prevent double taps. The French MAS49 series of rifle seems to be the worst offender although I have seen or heard of others doing it also.

I don't have any reloader 15, but should I run across some I'll certainly give it a shot. (pun not intended).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
ljungman manuals

go to google type in "ljngman service manual" will pull up several sites with manuals and/or
disassembly instructions.I shoot m41 military ammo in mine and have had no problems at all.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top