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Acutaly, Larry,

There are not many models made as 9.3X57.
You will have three choices, in fact.
First there was the model 46, made from the M/94 action (1927-1937).
From 1937 to 1941, they used FN LR M98 and called it the Model 146.
They made some cosmetic changes to the stock of the M/46 and renamed it Model 46A (1942-1943)

The final decision come to you; the m/46/46B is a light, handy rifle, while the M/146 is of heavier construction. The M/146 action makes it a better choice if one wants to push the 'ol' round to or close modern pressures.
the rest is really what you like; a C.o_O. or a C.o.C. action?....
 

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Larry,

I can clearly say there's a difference between shooting a m/46 and a M/146. The weight is there for something.
With a M/46 and a factory 285 grains (about 2050 fps) load, with a 6.5 lbs rifle, the recoil velocity is 17.1 ft/sec and the energy is 29.5ft-lbs. While it's not dramatical, it can be considered a bit stout, if not heavy by some, especially without a buttpad. The M/146 is about 1 1/2lbs heavier.
In my own X57 rifles (I mostly hunt with my X62s, though) I only shoot the 285 grains bullets, so, for me it's hard to pronounce, but the physics being what it is, if the recoil is worse with a 232 grains bullet, it must have something to do with pressure/velocity/muzzle blast. The type of pwder and the amount (%) burned inside the chamber/barrel will also play a role in the blast. Well, I did not talk with Lee about that one.
As for stock and finishing quality, as far as I know, all the M/46/46B/146 were stocked with walnut, so, it's not of a big concern, and general quality is typical HVA.
 

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Agreed for the recoil. When you shoot the 9.3X57, you feel it has plenty of power, but the felt recoil is not that much. Well, all depends where you are standing on the sensibility ladder.

Well, as you point out, the 8X57, expecially with light (say faster) bullets is sometimes hard to handle "blast" wise, and it usually kicks much more than others in light rifles.
Especially in light sporter rifles, like the 1600 Std. To avoid the blast created with short barrelled rifle like my wife's 1600 Std 30-06, I simply switched to faster burning powder (using RL15 instead of W760/IMR4350). It's now much less a kicker and there is almost no muzzle rise. I've done that with the 8X57, too, and it also works fine.

Some stocks designs are also painful to shoot in some calibers....
 

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Larry,

Unless there's an evident crack on the stock, I do not bed my old rifles.
I presently have and use a M/46 in 9.3X57 and my 'ol buddy, a M/649 (M/94) in 9.3X62 and none of them are bedded. I did relief the fore end on both rifles, and the tang, though. I own quite a bit of them and never had to re-bed any except those have the (in)famous crack.
And the M/46 kicks much less than the M/649....

Nobody out there who can take Larry to the pit to make the thing spit some lead?
 
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