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I just received an untouched 1837 Brunswick from IMA. I will post more pics later but I wanted to get an opinion on this crack at the end of the fore stock and it's repair-ability. Seems like I should be able too what do you think? Norm? anyone else?

 

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That?? Heck yeah. Just clean the area very well, apply epoxy, clamp, and wipe excess with mineral spirits. Obviously, you'll need a barrel escutcheon....IMA should be able to assist with that. Congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What is a barrel escutcheon? LOL Sorry noob here. Also if I follow Norms plan I cover both my snider and brunswick in ACE paint thinner and clean again with Super clean. Then I put on WD and work on dis assembly? Sound right. If so, How long do you leave the paint thinner and super clean on before wiping? Thanks for your help
 

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The escutcheon is where the barrel key goes through..the thing that attaches the barrel and the stock....that odd shape in the stock where it looks like something is missing? That's it...you should see similarly shaped ones on both sides of the stock. Before you do anything, think about the final product.....what are you looking to do? If you want to maintain the original finishes of the wood and metal, then you need to take one route......if you want to strip it down to the bare wood/metal and start over, then another route is required. Figure out what you want, first....
 

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Then you need to go very slowly. Nothing harsh. No strippers. Maintaining original finishes is a labor of love....remember the word labor. haha........First I would clean all the crud from the screw slots and carefully take everything apart. If it doesn't want to budge, soak in penetrating oil. I like to use a sonicator for the metal parts, but you can easily just soak them overnight in something like TSP (available from Lowe's) and then brush any dirt off with a stiff plastic brush or toothbrush. I use 0000 steel wool and Kroil or Fitz polish to remove any surface rust, then lightly go over everything with a soft wire wheel on a dremel. People cringe when they hear "wire wheel" but it does nothing to the patina. It just basically polishes and brightens what's there. For the wood, I use Kramer's Blemish Clarifier and Antique Improver. The stuff is very expensive...IMA carries it. You can get good results from using BLO and synthetic wool. I hate steel wool because it leaves metal stuck in the pores. You may need to be liberal with the BLO, let it sit for 30 minutes....then scrub a little.....and repeat.....and repeat. You have to go easy and see if you're getting the result you want. Patience is a major virtue. For the barrel I've recently just used Kroil and 0000 steel wool and gotten good results, ie. maintained the patina. WD40 will also work well. Believe me, I'm pretty new to all this....this is just what I do when I want to maintain the original finishes. 10 people will give you 10 other ways to do it...you know how it goes? Post lots of pics, too.
 

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It looks like you got a good one. As Tom and Norm said, i should be an easy fix, proceed carefully and take your time, you'll do fine. Nice Snyder, btw. Oh, and good to see that you also got the new patchbox cover as well.
 

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450thumper

go to ace hardware and get a piece of brass do not know what its call, and I say ace hardware because I know they will have it

I think its 12 in L 3/4 in W .070 T






it should work fine to make a barrel escutcheon

NORM
I'd call it brass sheet, or shim brass. Another source would be a hobby shop - they usually have brass sheet in a number of thicknesses.
 

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450thumper, get the stock repaired first. Then lay a piece of paper over the escutcheon inlet and using the side of a pencil, rub over the inlet - this will give you close to exactly the correct shape of the escutcheon. Cut it out carefully and use a thin coat of contact cement to glue the pattern to your brass. Use a jewelers saw to cut it out then drill the screw holes. Come to think of it, most people don't have a jewelers saw. If you don't cut the brass with snips used for cutting tin or other thin metals, then, use a needle file to take it down to the correct shape before you drill the holes.

Measure the size of the head of the screws holding the others in and while you are at the hardware store, find some small STEEL wood screws close to the same size as used in the other escutcheons.
 
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