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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am slowly starting to work on a partial re-write / 2nd printing of the Naval Special Type 99 book. Anyway, I have hit on an issue that has bothered my previously. Attached is a photo of the left side of the receiver of a NST99. From left to right it has and plain anchor, then an anchor with two downward strokes coming off of the upper shaft, then a third stamp that is not easily seen here, which is the circled character "O" - ㋔ - indicating Osaka and probably Izawa as the manufacturer.

My question involves the middle stamp (anchor). Its form does not quite match the Maizuru anchor form as I can understand it nor does it look like any of the others of which I am aware. I looked through my earliest reference material - 5th Edition of "Military Rifle of Japan" and "Japanese Bayonets", they don't seem answer the question.

Can anyone clarify who the anchor, as stamped on this NST99, really represents? Is there a different original source document for the anchors? Any help would be appreciated.

I have attached my list of anchors and you can see that the anchor on the rifle is different from these.

Frank
 

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Frank,
I can only comment on the "look" of your center stamp. Given a Maizuru anchor, transferred to a very small, and likely less detailed stamp, and then the condition of the receiver and the curve where stamped, noting the missing or very light lower part of the stamp; FWIW, I can see it as Maizuru.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, this is tough. maybe some one has a better picture of a similarly marked NST99 that will show it more clearly?????

Frank
 

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The problem with it being Maizuru is this anchor appears not only on Naval Special rifles, but as a pistol grip proof on many Navy training rifles. Maizuru wasn't involved in production or inspection of Navy training rifles and it wasn't mentioned by my Heirinkan Firearms KK contact, Mr. Shoji Ueda, who gave Frank and me so much help assembling historical information for our book.

Attached is the same pistol grip anchor proof, placed alongside a circled "ナコ" (presently unidentified proof). Sure would be nice to determine what these markings mean.

Fred H. - any ideas?

C/
 

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Hi Kiipu - The character "コ" may be an abbreviation for the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, while the character "ナ" possibly refers to a private company located in Nagoya. At least that's my current belief. Please note this marking also appears on non-arms related goods, such as that shown in the photo
3809696
below.

C/
 

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The problem with it being Maizuru is this anchor appears not only on Naval Special rifles, but as a pistol grip proof on many Navy training rifles. Maizuru wasn't involved in production or inspection of Navy training rifles and it wasn't mentioned by my Heirinkan Firearms KK contact, Mr. Shoji Ueda, who gave Frank and me so much help assembling historical information for our book.

Attached is the same pistol grip anchor proof, placed alongside a circled "ナコ" (presently unidentified proof). Sure would be nice to determine what these markings mean.

Fred H. - any ideas?

C/
Chip, I'm also puzzled by this. The id on those anchors were on a drawing sent by a contact in Japan back in '76. It's going to take some digging to find the correspondence. I'm now questioning the Maizura id (which is how I attack problems - I go all the way back and start over. Sometimes that pays off). This will take some time.
 

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Thanks Fred. Was hoping you'd join the discussion. Any help on the "Na - Ko" proof would be most welcome, as it sometimes appears on Navy clocks, optical gear, and other, non-firearms items.

C/
 

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Sorry to be so tardy in answering this thread, but we got our get-out-of-jail-free cards (covid shot) a few weeks ago, and I immediately screamed road-trip. So, have been out of town for a couple weeks. I can't find yet the original correspondence from Japan on naval arsenal ids, but the info shown is also in Elks book, plus other books I suppose. Maybe this is just conincidence, but note that "T" is formed with addition to anchor on Toyokawa, "Y" on Yokosuka, "S" on Sasebo, and "M" on Maizuro. More than coincidence, I dunno, but the IJN, unlike the IJA, continued to use the English alphabet letters on stamps during the war. I recognize omission of Kure, but that's a really old facility, and, but of course, the additional symbols do appear as waves.
 
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