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Discussion Starter #1
This rifle is a puzzle for me.Does it have the usual markings proofing the weapon before issue to british soldiers?The stampings on the receiver indicates that it was manufactured by Remington at its subsidiary Eddystone plant.It has a british or colonial style webbing rifle sling.The serial number is 65677.
Did a P-14 have a marking indicating that model.
I have read that the U.S. arsenals had a surplus of P-14's that were not needed by the Brit's and that Remington reconfigured them as P-17's.I do not know if this correct?
The stock may be British since it has the volley fire brass circle but without the lever.
I do not have the tools to determine is this chambered for 303 British or the30-06 round.
 

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Pattern 14.
 

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This rifle is a puzzle for me.Does it have the usual markings proofing the weapon before issue to british soldiers?The stampings on the receiver indicates that it was manufactured by Remington at its subsidiary Eddystone plant.It has a british or colonial style webbing rifle sling.The serial number is 65677.
Did a P-14 have a marking indicating that model.
I have read that the U.S. arsenals had a surplus of P-14's that were not needed by the Brit's and that Remington reconfigured them as P-17's.I do not know if this correct?
The stock may be British since it has the volley fire brass circle but without the lever.
I do not have the tools to determine is this chambered for 303 British or the30-06 round.




Looks like mine....
 

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its a 1914 not a bad looking one either very nice
 

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I have read that the U.S. arsenals had a surplus of P-14's that were not needed by the Brit's and that Remington reconfigured them as P-17's.I do not know if this correct?
It isn't correct. All Model 1917 Rifles (not P-17's) were manufactured as such.

Your rifle is almost certainly chambered for .303. The face of the bolt alone should confirm that it isn't a .30-06.
 

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Your receiver markings are pure P14, as is the sling and the long range sight. Although the stocks WILL interchange, you won't find all that many 1917's in P14 wood.

Two easy ways to tell the difference in the receivers is the 'ears' on top of a P14 are about a quarter inch longer than those on a 1917, and the ejector cut on the side of the receiver is significantly longer on a P14 than the one on a 1917. The 1917 ejector slot barely peeks out from behind the bolt stop, while the one on a P14 is a lot longer than the bolt stop.
 

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A very nice Pattern 1914, and one that went through the Weedon Repair Standard, as indicated by the star mark on the receiver.
 

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I thought Eddystone built P14s were marked ERA and the Remington rifles marked RE as in the first post? For sure, my ERA P14 says ERA on the receiver.

I believe you will find more P14s in M1917 wood than the other way round.
 

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Easiest way to tell a P14 from a model 1917.
the Model 1917 is marked U.S. M1917 on the reciever. LOL And we sure as heck didn't put volley sights on M1917's

Oh by the way there was no surplus of P14's, but Lee Enfield production had finaly caught up. Our problem was that we didn't have enough 03 Springfields, so the P14 was redesigned as the M1917 NOT converted, and far more U.S. WW1 troops were armed with it than with 03's

Ultimately the Brits didn't use the P14 in the first go-round with the germans, but they came in real handy for the second round.
 

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Easiest way to tell a P14 from a model 1917.
the Model 1917 is marked U.S. M1917 on the reciever. LOL And we sure as heck didn't put volley sights on M1917's
+1 on the volley sights, but the receiver marking on some of the VERY earliest model 1917's I have seen (they had 4 and low 5 digit serial numbers) were nothing more than the serial number (much like the British guns), and a set of US proofmarks.
 

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Your receiver markings are pure P14, as is the sling and the long range sight. Although the stocks WILL interchange, you won't find all that many 1917's in P14 wood.
The stocks aren't really interchangable, due to differences in the length of the trigger guards to accomodate the longer US round.
 

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The stocks aren't really interchangable, due to differences in the length of the trigger guards to accomodate the longer US round.
I once owned a P14 that came to me in (as far as I could ever tell) unmodified, undoubtedly, M1917 wood (you could still see the cartouches). The receiver and trigger guard fit just fine in the inletting, and although the barrel had some throat wear, it seemed to shoot just fine, too.

I sold it about 10 years ago when I got a better example (a Weedon-modified Winchester P14).

When I compare the two rifles side by side, the magazine boxes are definitely different, but it looks like all the differences are internal. The .303 box had to be adapted and 'bushed' to fit the receiver and handle a shorter cartridge, and not so much so for the .30-06. The outside dimensions of the magazine boxes are pretty much the same.

That 'extended' rear sight ears (and the longer ejector) on the P14 receiver are also pretty obvious adaptations to make the P13 into something that would better take .303.

The P14 was an adaptation of the Pattern 13, with was designed around a longer, rimless, round. The tooling was largely adapted once it got to the US to make .303 rifles.

The round that the Pattern 13 was being developed with was much more similar in length to the .30-06, meaning that the original receiver and magazine design needed more adaptation to use the .303 than it later needed to use .30-06.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What were the characteristics of the original stocks on the Remington-Eddystone made P-14's as supplied to the British?
My stock pictures noted above on this has the brass disc but no lever on the forward disc and no rear volley sight.I have a buyer who wants a discount because of this.This is a Weedon modified Re-Ed p-14.Replies have noted that this is a British stock. My understanding is that starting in 1909 the volley attachment were remove but for whatever reason the the brass discs were left intact. I have two early Lee Enfields where the complete volley sights are still present.How common are these P-14 available today?The rifle shoots well and is a delight to fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What is a fair market price for this Weedon modified P-14?

I am not aware of the current prices for a gun such as this one noted in this post.Suggestions please.
 

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Actualy your rifle does have the rear volley sight but the arm with the peep is cut off. The rifle is CORRECT for
WW2 NOT before
Your buyer is trying to work a deal
Now here's the fun part, have six of them with the volley signts intact! from all three makers
But mounted BSA Target sights on three. Have the rear peeps and rear sights so eventualy someone could put them back on if they wanted to
Also one M1917 with RCAF markings
 

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as john notes your rifle [REmington Pattern 1914] is correct for wheedon standards of WWII [i take it 1909 in your post is a typo] , it could have been refitted with the scottish made replacement stock but then the volley sight dial on the forearm would not be present , it is wearing a WWI british stock with the dial arm removed ,

the "eddystone" stocks were meatier in the magwell area and got labled "fatboy stocks" , other than that all three mfgrs were the same in original nick ,

the M1917 stock has a bit longer magwell area and the parts do not interchange neatly ,

prices are dependent on market in your area , and if someone wants a WWI vintage rifle they will be on a search for parts , a WWI equiped version may well draw a higher price because of the hard to find bits but your rifle is a great example of WWII service vintage ,
 

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The stocks aren't really interchangable, due to differences in the length of the trigger guards to accomodate the longer US round.
The trigger guards are essentially the same, although the magazine box in the M17 is longer than the p14, to accommodate the longer 30-06 round. Because the P14 was just a modification of the original P13 design, the action length, trigger guard and floor plate were longer than needed for the .303 round. They had been designed for the large .276 (7mm) Enfield round.
I have fitted a DP (Drill Purpose) P14 stock to an M17 rifle. The main difference is that the M17 barrel is larger in diameter than the P14, so the barrel channel needs to be opened up.

One easy way to pick the difference betwen the two is the shape of the extractor. The M17 extractor hook is the same width as the extractor body, like a Mauser, but the P14 extractor hook is much narrower than the extractor body. It is similar to the width of a Lee Enfield extractor.
 
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