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I have had this for a couple years now and searched for info on it when I first got it but it turned out to be a fruitless effort. The blade reads "J.A Henchels Zwillingswerk" and has a symbol that looks like two people connected at the arm doing an egyptian dance.
here some pics. Any information would be appreciated.
 

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I have a WW1 bayonet with the Henckels logo on it.Mine is dated 17 on the spine. The only info I found on this company is that its German and has been around since 1731 to the present.
 

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Henckels

Of course, this Henckels is the VERY SAME company that now manufacture the justly famous kitchen cutlery, sold at major department stores like Macy's; specialty kitchen shops like Williams-Sonoma; etc. Their logo is called the Twins ( Zwillig in German ), and represents the forging process for their steel. I wasn't aware it was as old as when they made military cutlery! This poor sword has been much rebuilt: the wooden grip is very much a replacement. This type saber would've had a much slimmer and better proportioned wooden grip, covered with either leather ( probably ); or "sharkskin" ( actually rayskin ) if for an officer's model, then wound with a strand of twisted brass or copper wire. The large nut atop the pommel is a very crude way of reassembling it; originally, the tang would've been peened. This sword is a late 19th century interpretation of the Hussar style from the mid-1700's. Obviously it's German-made; but very possibly for export. Most likely it was used by some minor German state or principality, maybe even before there was a "Germany" as we think of it today.
 
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