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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I originally thought it was a swedish m94, but there's no manufacture date or maker stamp on the receiver, a cleaning rod hole in the nosecap, and no stock disc. It basically looks like this:
http://masterton.us/Carbines1916

but i'll get pictures up when I can.
The stock and receiver match, the bolt doesn't, bore looks good, and stock looks pretty glossy red. I have no idea what these are worth or anything. They want $225 for it.

Opinions? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
That page doesn't show the sling attatchments but they are the same as the older carbines - the "staple" style in the back, and I think the swivelling oval in the front.
 

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The Spanish 93/1916 actions have a square bottom on the bolt face. The Swedish actions have a guide rib on the bolt like the 98 Mauser and the bolt face is round. You see a lot of unmarked Spanish actions; the Swedish actions are usually well marked if they are still in military configuration.
 

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The devil is in the details. There are a lot of Spanish 1916 short rifles about that are often referred to as "carbines" because the 1893 long rifles were so long (29 inch barrels). A true 1916 carbine is seldom seen. If the rifle is stocked to the muzzel (like a Swedish carbine) then it may be an 1895 carbine and these are not often seen any more either. The Spanish under Franco did not set much store in the old Royal Spanish crest and they were usually scrubbed off the receiver along with foreign manufacturers' marks on the various military rifles they had accumulated by the end of the Spanish Civil War during rebuilds. The price is not bad for a 1916 short rifle in original 7x57 caliber if the condition is very good/excellent. For a full stocked carbine (original configuration- not a post import shortened 1893 rifle), then I would think it a very good deal. Beware that the importers cut down a lot of long rifles into "Mannlicher" sporters (as a sales ploy the term was used for any rifle stocked to the muzzel) in the 1960's and these have only shooter value now.
 
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