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OJT.....its come to this ? I'm not a Squid so I can't speak with any measure of expertise but I take a dim view of
sending untrained personnel aboard a ship because a ship that leaves port is operational...everything they do at sea
is seriously requiring skills as a crew. Ships leave port and go in harms way...facing the sea and whatever military
challenges that become necessary. Its not like a Infantry Company going to the back end of Ft. Bragg and training
with some new troops assigned in the unit...coming out of basic training only 40 percent trained in mandatory tasks.
If that Infantry company gets alerted for a mission, it can leave behind untrained / unsuitable troops and move out.

Ship at sea with untrained personnel aboard, what happens if disaster strikes or the ship is sent into combat operations.

The very least we owe men & women is to be trained before they arrive at their unit / ship. The Army half trains and its highly corrosive to the gaining unit which then has to make up for that slack and that degrades readiness. On a crew deployed at sea , untrained personnel aboard ....this does not pass my smell test.
 

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Guys, short changing training costs lives. I was fully trained before sent to Viet Nam. I was not sent there and
put in a OJT / Discovery Learning scenario with my life and others being put in the equation till I got trained or killed.

We cannot and should not expect our NCO's to pull up the slack of a service that tries to Cheap Charlie basic and MOS training .

I am not a Squid so I'll defer to those that are , but as a Infantry soldier, basic and advanced training is not an elective !
 

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Shipboard duty and the life of an infantryman are two different things. Ships don't go to sea with untrained crews.

Sailors, are, for the most part, technicians and fire fighters. (everyone is trained as a fire fighter) There are, however, some housekeeping duties that do not require a lot of skills or pre-ship training. There is a lot of paint chipping, deck scrubbing and food preparation on a ship. As a technician I was in school eight hours a day, five days a week, for about five months after boot camp. Some schools are much longer. What is necessary for non-technicians is learned in boot camp. Training aboard ship never stops for anyone. At sea, there is nothing to do but man your job, keep watches, train or sleep (in that order). You are on call 24/7/365. 16 hour work days are not infrequent. You don't go home at 4:00, there are no weekend liberties, no beer, and no sleeping in. It doesn't take long for an E1 in a non-technical position to come up to speed. The proof of the Navy's system is that it is rare indeed that you hear about U.S. Navy disasters at sea. Nor do any other navies of the world want to go head to head with Uncle Sam's sailors.
Let me be very clear to you, I never said nor nuanced the US Navy was not competent nor unable to do its mission. We do have a Navy, other nations...not so much. One has to wonder though, how many of those officers on watch were OJT when collisions occurred a few years ago. The Navy has had investigations of late about ships crews not being up to trained standards and readiness status being "fudged" so the ship can depart and go on patrol. Two issues there...crew training and officer ethics.
 
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