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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This weekend I cleaned my Mosin Nagant M44 (1955) the problem: no matter how many times I scrubbed the bore or ran patches soaked in cleaner the bore still wasn’t clean. I even soaked the bore with lead/copper solution and the still patches came out black.... I must've used over 50 patches!

Any suggestions?

BTW, I tried three different bore cleaners so I don't think it has anything to with the products I'm using especially since I've been using these products on all my other guns for years with excellent results.
 

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I use Windex first with a brush and then patches.Then I use the bore solvent.-1955 is it Chinese or eastern Block M-44?? some of those salty bores never seem to come very clean.Recheck the bore in a day or to and re clean-They can get rusty in a hurry
 

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Simply go and shoot the dirt out have worked best for me.
Try to send a few rounds through that bore and then clean it again. That should loosen up most of the old rust and gunk.
Might have to go through that prosess a couple of times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buy a bore snake they really work. I put a lot of patches through mine and got no where, then I pulled the bore snake through 3 times and it started to shine. Try it you will like it.
The weird thing is: the bore does shine even though patches will come out black!?! Never ran into this situation before.
 

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Some of these rifles you can clean and clean and clean some more and patches STILL come out dirty! It's frustrating!!!
Some of these will never get clean no matter how much you try.
For some of them, that's just the way they are; clean looking with dirty patches.

You might try to plug the bore and fill it up with hoppes or foaming bore cleaner and let it soak for a while.
 

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When I get stubborn black gunk on patches from a bore that appears clean I run a couple of patches with Brakleen through and it seems to get it out. Use this after you've removed any bore cleaner from the bore.
 

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+1 for shooting it 50 or 100 times, then clean it right then and there. It worked like a charm on my Hungarian M44. With much frustration I had already amassed the pile of black patches you mention, followed by an almost-as-large pile of green patches. Once I shot a few boxes of ammo through it, it only took 4 or 5 swipes until patches came out clean.
 

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My first mosin took over 300 patches to clean. The black is metal oxides trapped deep in the pores of the steel. Try some Sweet's 7.62 cleaner.
 

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I'd like to throw in another two cents worth myself.

As I had posted earlier, I've been bitten by the Moisin bug, like many of the other newcomers here, and aquired two rifles which the folks on the board here helped me identify as a '35 Tula with Hex receiver and a '43 Izsevsk Hi wall with a "YY" prefix.

The Tula had a very good bore, which somewhat surprised me considering the age and period of the rifle. This helped persuade me to buy it. The Izsevsk didn't have a very good bore at all. The rifling looked strong but it looked very dark and pitted. But the rifle was interesting enough so that despite the visible bore condition, I bought it as well.

Cleaning has been a rewarding experience. I do not have anything fancy in the way of newer cleaners. Just patches and solvent, and some brass brushes. I found firing and cleaning does work. I also went to an 8mm brush. And then I have used tons of just plain stubborn elbow grease.

The Izsevsk was fouled so badly that the cleaning rod would "skip" down through the bore, as if the bore diameter varied the whole length of the barrel. The Tula was nice enough so that I didn't expect any big results.

After lamenting that the '43 would never be any better than a "good" bore, I've got to tell you guys that it's startin g to surprise me. It's already in the very good range. The lands definetly shine, and the grooves, while still showing color, have begun to lighten. I can now see that the lands are fairly sharp, and that the rifle has suffered some small erosion at the throat. But the gun makes me smile more every time I clean it.

The Tula shines. Whatever "gungous" there has been in the bore has cleaned it's way out. The rifle is actualy in amazing condition, considering the age/period and the refurbishment.

So I've learned a couple things that I'll pass on for what their worth.

1. DON'T pass up a collectable 91 even if the bore appears shady. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. You'll never know for sure til you clean it.

2. Cleaning the bore is hard work BUT well worth all the effort. Ya just gott keep after it, like the other guys have said.

After all, firearms collecting is a labor of love. If they're just sitting on the shelf, you're not really getting any enjoyment out of them. That's why I'm learning to like these Moisin Nagants so well. All this fun for under a hundred bucks!

Happy Holidays.
Best,
Northy
 

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1. Advanced Auto Parts Carb & Choke cleaner ... breaks up carbon deposits
2. Shooter's Choice Extreme Clean ... potent foaming spray with a little more guts than their bore cleaner solvent. Let soak for a day
3. Wipe Out foaming bore cleaner ... awesome stuff that will get down to bare metal but best results are to fill up the bore and let sit (over a heater vent or something warm) for 3 days each cycle. Wipe Out will get it clean but may take several cycles.
4. David Tubb's Final Finish bore conditioning bullets ... five grades of compound coated polishing bullets. Meant to polish any rough spots out of throat and bore of a clean rifle for improved accuracy, they will polish out the crud and leave the insides mirror bright. You do have to hand stuff the 50 round set, fire in order ten at a time, scrub well between each set.

Bottom line... If it is that crud filled and blackened, how badly worn is it to begin with and is it worth all the effort in the end? If really worn, you may have to clean it out and then shoot a bunch of copper jacketed rounds and leave the residue behind to tighten it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
+1 for shooting it 50 or 100 times, then clean it right then and there. It worked like a charm on my Hungarian M44. With much frustration I had already amassed the pile of black patches you mention, followed by an almost-as-large pile of green patches. Once I shot a few boxes of ammo through it, it only took 4 or 5 swipes until patches came out clean.
EXACTLY what I'm getting..."black patches followed by an almost-as-large pile of green patches!"

I think I'll shoot the crap out of it (pun intended) if that doesn't work I'll try some of the other suggestions.

Apparently I'm not alone in this experience.


Many that's to all for the suggestions!!!
 

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I've had great success using Berryman's "Chem Dip" Carburater and parts cleaner for most badly fouled bores. "Gunk" Parts Cleaner is even better but more costly. Remove the metal from the stock. Use a plug in the muzzle and fill up the barrel to the top of the chamber. Let set overnight and wire brush thoroughly. Wash out with hot water. Patch dry immediately as it will rust quickly. Check with another clean patch. If debris remains evident (which I doubt) Wrap a solvent soaked patch (Hoopes #9 is what I use) around a used brush and pass through a few times, repeat the process again.
I've found that the Parts Cleaner will normally remove just about anything stuck to the bore or receiver except rust. You must reoil the metal since it dissolves all oil and grease it penetrates into.
It's best to use a nylon brush with any cleaner containing copper solvent in it to keep from getting the green patches. The green comes from the solvent dissolving the metal brush.
Sweet's 7.62 is good for copper deposits but a lot of trouble to use.
 

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A couple of thoughts. One, if you are using a copper solvent cleaner with a brass or bronze brush you may be disolving some of the bristles with the copper solvent which will then continue to come out green or dark on your patches afterwards. You may wish to switch to a stainless steel or nylon brush if you think this is the case.

Two. Shoot it. I had a 1934 M27 that the bore looked like a sewer pipe. Rough and dark. I used several different bore cleaners, different brushes, tons of patches, let Hoppes and CLP soak over time after sending wet patches down the bore, did the foaming bore cleaner, chucked up the stainless brush in a drill and power-brushed the bore from end to end, etc. It still looked the same. Sure, lots of dirty patches came out, but still the bore was rough and dark with barely discernible rifling. Pretty much accepted that that was what I was going to always have with this one. Then I took it to the range, shot about 10 rounds through it as quickly as I could reload and then cleaned her there on the spot while still hot. Now the bore shines. Wished I has shot it sooner, would have saved alot of fruitless work.

Best wishes as you pursue the end results.
 

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My first mosin took over 300 patches to clean. The black is metal oxides trapped deep in the pores of the steel. Try some Sweet's 7.62 cleaner.
That's what I used on mine and it works wonderfully. I used Break Free first w/bore brush to scrub the barrel, ran several patches until they came out clean and then used the Sweets. Man, did they ever come out dirty again. But once done the barrel shines like the sun. Plus the Sweets contains ammonia to neutralize the corrosive residue from that eastern-bloc ammo.
 
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