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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm not really a USGI weapons guy at all. I love 1911's, but that's about it. All I could tell you about Garands is that they're heavy and not exactly easy to field-strip and reassemble. But I am reading Eric Hammel's book on Guadalcanal and have to admit, it has me thinking about these rifles. I remember recently seeing something about CMP getting large numbers of Garands in from somewhere recently (Greece?).

Years ago I thought about doing the CMP thing, but when I read up on it on their website it just seemed like too many hoops for an overly competitive process. I figured the locals would have cherry-picked the nice ones at the CMP stores, so why bother.

I still to tend to think that way, but thought I should see if I was wrong. Also, an active duty military bud of mine said we don't need to be a club member anywhere to buy a rifle (I only support GOA and don't do clubs), just our military ID. Is this true?

I remain confused. I heard unhappy things once upon a time about Danish Garands, and sorta' filed the reports away in the "forget about that" category. The CMP website seemed to indicate that the fair to good Garands are all they have. Anyone here own one of those?

Just wondering what to do, how to go about it and what I would get if I pursue the matter. My thanks in advance for any information and/or advice.

Scott
 

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Hello,
I collect primarily Finnish Mosins, but I had to have at least one Garand.
Getting a Garand from CMP is not too difficult. I went throught the process early last year. Since I already have a C&R FFL, to qualify all I had to do was joined online the CA Rifle&Pistol Associate (paid $18), got a local notary to stamp my application ($10) and then mailed my application to CMP. Nearly three months later, my field grade SA Garand arrived in a giant cardboard box. My Garand has a good shiny bore, very good stock with a few minor dings and very good everything else. It had been checked by the master gunsmith at CMP and was IMHO very good condition. Best of all, it was less than $450.
I hadn't heard about CMP getting more Garands. If so, good news for us. I think you should go for it. You won't regret it.
 

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You just missed a long thread on this subject. I love the Garand! Field stripping is not hard after a little experience. I can field strip mine in the dark (old style training). Can field strip easily in less than 5 min. Does'nt require any tools for field strip (gas cylinder lock screw not included). A bullet tip works for follower pin.

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=2035
 

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Get A Service Grade

Buy a service grade this is the best deal out there right now. Also grab some of there Greek ammo on clips and you will be ggod to go.
HTH
Barry In MO.
 

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The Civilian Marksmanship Program or CMP has a fantastic web presence.
www.odcmp.com/
You should start by going to their site and downloading the forms. When the link opens scroll down the page and you will see where the forms to download are located.

1. For starters you must be a United States Citizen and have proof of that. Some discharge papers have a place where that is noted others do not. I recommend that you send proof of US citizenship just to be sure.
2. You must belong to an organization that is affiliated with the CMP. Most states have a state rifle and pistol assoc. that you can join. You can also meet that requirement by joining the Garand Collector's Association
http://www.thegca.org/

3.You must provide proof of marksmanship participation by demonstrating one of the following:

Current or past military service.

Current or past law enforcement service

Participation in air rifle, pistol,air gun or shotgun competition (provide copy of results bulletin).

Completion of a marksmanship clinic that included live fire training (provide a copy of the certificate of completion or a statement from the instructor).

Distinguished,Instructor,or Coach status.

Concealed Carry License.

Firearms Owner Identification Card.

FFL or C&R license.

Completion of a Hunter Safety Course that included live fire training.

Certification from range or club official or law enforcemen officer witnessing shooting activity. A form for use in completing and certifying your range firing can be downloaded from the CMP website.

No proof required if over age 60.

4.Fill out the forms and send in $$$$$$.Be sure to get the Waiver notarized.

Repeat Customers:
In the summer of 2003, the CMP revised the purchase forms and streamlined procedures for repeat customers. If you complete a new Universal Purchaser Certification and Agreement to buy a rifle from the CMP, signed before a Notary Public on or after July1,2003, you may for a period of three(3) years thereafter submit an application to purchase additional rifles, parts or ammunition without having the Purchase Certification and Agreement notarized -provided that the “SHIP TO” address on the order form remains exactly the same.

Although for repeat orders you will not have to have orms notarized, hard copy liability/order/certification forms–pages2a, 3a, and 4a–must still be completed and sent to the CMP with original(wet)signatures. These orders may not be faxed or e-mailed.

After three years a new notarized Universal Purchaser Certification and Agreement will be required for any additional rifle purchase. Any change of address on the order form automatically will require a new notarized Universal Purchaser Certification and Agreement.

Please note that this streamlined procedure is available only to customers who have completed a notarized “Universal”Purchaser Certification and Agreement. An application submitted on an earlier form (dated before summer 2003 or not titled “Universal” will still be processed by CMP, but for that transaction only; it will not be accepted for repeat sales.

Proof of citizenship, age, CMP-affiliated club membership and competitive shooting participation, and any copy of any license, permit, or Firearms Owner ID card required by your State or locality submitted with your initial“ Universal” application will be kept on file by the CMP. If any item of proof above has expired, you must submit proof of current status with any subsequent application.


Now to debunk a few things. You do not have to jump through hoops. They will work with you in lots of ways. You do not have to join a "club", attend meetings and shoot your match at that club. The affiliated organization and shooting requirements are eperate things. They can however take place at a CMP affiliated club where you can shoot in a match
 

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Just keep yur fingers outa there!

Think Hakim thumb! I had a Garand years ago, got it from the Govmnt for like $125, didn't like it, traded it off. As I remember it was branny new, still had the little carboard tube down the bore. One of my lifes big mistakes..............
 

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I say visit the south store in person. Maybe then you'll finally decide to leave California. ;)

OK, barring a visit to Dixie, I'd say the advice to get a service grade is good. If you are at the store, you can pick up nice field grades, but some stinkers in there too. I don't recall seeing a bad service grade yet.
 

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IF you think Mosin Nagant rifle collecting is addictive, then DO NOT get yourself an M1 Garand!!! Not only is collecting M1s just as fascinating as the MN, it is just as addictive.
Besides that, the rifle is really fun to shoot. And it eats ammo like a teenager eats pizza.
So, I'm warnin' ya, don't ever do it. Unless you have incredible will power, and can limit yourself to just one...or two...or let's see, mmmm, three? four?
 

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Hello,
I collect primarily Finnish Mosins, but I had to have at least one Garand.
Getting a Garand from CMP is not too difficult. I went throught the process early last year. Since I already have a C&R FFL, to qualify all I had to do was joined online the CA Rifle&Pistol Associate (paid $18), got a local notary to stamp my application ($10) and then mailed my application to CMP. Nearly three months later, my field grade SA Garand arrived in a giant cardboard box. My Garand has a good shiny bore, very good stock with a few minor dings and very good everything else. It had been checked by the master gunsmith at CMP and was IMHO very good condition. Best of all, it was less than $450.
I hadn't heard about CMP getting more Garands. If so, good news for us. I think you should go for it. You won't regret it.
I didn't know a C&R would help in getting a CMP Garand! Do you have a link to the CA Rifle&Pistol Associate website?
 

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garand collectrs association membership is an option

annual membership of $25.00 will fulfill one of the requirements
GCA has a quarterly journal that chronicles the history of the great rifle.
gil
 

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I have received several M1's

Over the past several years and have yet to get a loser. My last one was a Greek Rack Grade that I had converted to .308. The CMP is the best deal going for M1's and the Baby m1's. Don't forget to order the Greek 30.06. Bob
 

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If I remember correctly

Those are thread protectors. I got them at Lowe's. Hardware section, specially screws and fixtures. I can't remember the size but they are cheap so you can get a couple of sizes and take back the ones that don't fit. Bob
 

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CMP Garands

If you're Active Duty or Ready Reserve you'll need:

A copy of your military ID card (that fulfills your requirement to be affiliated to a shooting organization and proof of marksmanship training).
A copy of your birth certificate (proves US citizenship) unless you're an officer.
Filled out forms.
And of course money.

That's all you'll need if you're Active Duty or Ready Reserve. It's all I needed.
 

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Thinking about a CMP Garand

Nobody has mentioned the American Legion and VFW. If you are already a member of the AL (and I believe the VFW too), you don't have to be a member of any club. I have 14 of the things and I just sent a copy of my current AL card and it was acceptable. CMP has a top of the line customer service too, as well as top notch armorers to fix any problems with newly received weapons. They have received new batches of M1s from the Army, from Greece and reportedly from Italy, but that is not yet confirmed. You will never regret getting M1s and ammo from CMP, but like the man said, Garanditis is catching!!!! Enjoy
 

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Getting a Garand is on my list of things to do when funds allow.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
The Service Grade is pretty much just a foreign military sales rifle that's come back and been "put together," right? IOW a shooter, not really a collectible piece.

I wonder if I should hold off until Correct Grade copies become available (?).

I just sent in my renewal app for CRPA. Thanks for the answers and your continued help, fellas...

Scott
 

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Correct Grades Might be There Or Not

If (and this is a big if) any collector or correct grades come available they will go really quick and they will be from Greek or another foreign country which is not a big deal. If there is only a small number they will most likely go to the auction. There will be no more from the current US inventory they need those for the ceremonial rifles. The current service grades are built up from barreled receivers and parts on hand. The new shipment of Greeks returns have not been opened yet and will probably not be available till early next year. I would jump on the service grade right now if I didn't just buy a new truck I would have ordered one already. So I still say if you have the money I say go for it do not wait.
HTH
Barry In MO.
 

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The Service Grade is pretty much just a foreign military sales rifle that's come back and been "put together," right? IOW a shooter, not really a collectible piece.

I wonder if I should hold off until Correct Grade copies become available (?).

I just sent in my renewal app for CRPA. Thanks for the answers and your continued help, fellas...

Scott
The "Special" grade is the one put together out of mostly new parts. The Service grade is mostly a mechanical condition designation. See CMP's description:

SERVICE GRADE: (Good to Very Good)
Service Grade Rifles show less wear and better appearance than Field or Rack Grades. Good to very good condition. Rifle wear will be exhibited by worn and mixed colors of the parkerized finish; there may be some minor pitting on the metal parts; wood will be either Walnut, Birch, Beech or other variety and will be basically sound but may have minor hairline cracks, dings, scratches and gouges; wood may not match in color or type of wood; bores will be generally good with only minor imperfections; the barrel crown may be nicked, but the muzzle will gauge less than 3 and the throat erosion will gauge less than 5.
The special grade rifles should perform very well, as the have new Criterion barrels and CMP-sourced Boyds stocks. That means you get two of the critical Garand accuracy items, good bore and good bedding.

If you go for the service grade, you will likely get something significantly better than the description, and some that I have seen were essentially new rifles. A bit of a gamble in a way vs. the "special".
 
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