Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up a G43 with a bubba’d stock that has been hacked to death. The sad thing is, the rifle is in excellent condition minus the stock. So I set about replacing this and making it a shooter. I ordered a stock from an eBay seller: MilitaryOnline as he has 457 positive feedback and was recommended through someone that I know locally who restores these Gewehr 43s from time to time. I asked the seller if these stocks were drop in. He said yes, that they almost always are and that maybe light sanding would be required.

Fast forward to getting the stock, it’s nowhere close to fitting. I had to remove a ton of material for the rear of the receiver to fit in the stock and when it does fit the barrel and front of the gun teter and jut out of the stock pointing upwards. If I adjust the gun to where the barrel is flush in the stock the receiver butts upward. I’ve sanded and sanded and sanded the contact areas and I just can’t figure it out. The front of the gun (barrel and rsb) need to sit lower in the stock but the geometry of the stock is just not allowing for it.

Seller claims my gun is at fault but my action drops in not one original German stock, but two. So my gun is not out of spec it’s the stock. Any one ever have a similar issue trying to bed or fit a repro stock?
Bicycle tire Wood Bicycle fork Bicycle part Carbon

Wood Musical instrument Rectangle Material property Flooring

Wood Line Material property Flooring Road surface

Black Wood Rectangle Floor Wall
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Is that one of the hardwood reproductions from Poland? If so, I have one as well and it took a LOT of fitting work to get my action in. I am at work at the moment but hopefully later today I can upload some pictures of just how much material I had to hack away, I think it was up to a half inch in some places. One trick I used to tell where the problems were was to coat the bottom of the action in an obnoxious color of cheap craft acrylic paint and try to lower the action in while its still wet. Wherever the gun transfers the paint is where binding is happening. Hopefully I can elaborate more later!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is that one of the hardwood reproductions from Poland? If so, I have one as well and it took a LOT of fitting work to get my action in. I am at work at the moment but hopefully later today I can upload some pictures of just how much material I had to hack away, I think it was up to a half inch in some places. One trick I used to tell where the problems were was to coat the bottom of the action in an obnoxious color of cheap craft acrylic paint and try to lower the action in while its still wet. Wherever the gun transfers the paint is where binding is happening. Hopefully I can elaborate more later!
Yes! I feel like I have removed a TON of material but I will try your method and see where it gets me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
This guy who sells these stocks on ebay claims they are "the best" you can buy. That is a lie.

I bought one recently and let me tell you it was worthless. Every. Single. Dimension. On that stock- was wrong. Overall it was 10% bigger than an original in almost every respect. No metal fit on the stock because it was over sized. The trigger guard was milled out incorrectly and would have required extensive in-letting to make the trigger guard fit. There were even missing holes for pins that were not drilled. the recoil lug hole was drilled incorrectly and the recoil lug included was essentially a spanner screw that would never take recoil load.

To top it all off- they are solid beech stocks which is incorrect for a laminated gun. So it will never look like an original no matter how hard you try with stain to age it. So I had to essentially eat $300.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This guy who sells these stocks on ebay claims they are "the best" you can buy. That is a lie.

I bought one recently and let me tell you it was worthless. Every. Single. Dimension. On that stock- was wrong. Overall it was 10% bigger than an original in almost every respect. No metal fit on the stock because it was over sized. The trigger guard was milled out incorrectly and would have required extensive in-letting to make the trigger guard fit. There were even missing holes for pins that were not drilled. the recoil lug hole was drilled incorrectly and the recoil lug included was essentially a spanner screw that would never take recoil load.

To top it all off- they are solid beech stocks which is incorrect for a laminated gun. So it will never look like an original no matter how hard you try with stain to age it. So I had to essentially eat $300.
I finally got pissed and hogged out the entire bed of the stock. Took at least another 1/2 inch off of what I already hogged out. Got down to the end of it, the barrel and action fit flush. Went to put the trigger guard on and the trigger guard is nowhere close to lining up with the holes in the receiver and action. I would have to chisel and refit the trigger guard to this stock and I’m honestly just sick of looking at this $300 abomination.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,426 Posts
I too ran into the same issue with my Poland stock. Took me several hours to get it to fit, but once i got it fit it was amazing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Fox stocks remain the absolute gold standard. My action fit into that stock perfectly with no modifications. However the owner is currently experiencing health problems and has a 1+ year wait list.

Per the ebay seller, I gave neutral feed back and layed out some of the problems with the stock. He began messaging me requesting I delete my feedback. I asked for a refund and he then never messaged me again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Glad to hear you got it sorted out! I'll add my stuff below just in case somebody else gets one of these and finds the same issue. I mostly used a dremel and a metal grinding bit which I found worked very well, despite it not being for this purpose. Other tools included various sized chisels, files/rasps of various sizes, and a belt sander.

Ok, have a bit of time now to elaborate... here is a picture of the finished product to maybe give you some motivation lol
Plant Wood Natural material Grass Air gun


Here are a few images of areas I removed. The worst spots were at the rear of the receiver on the little foot where the rear-most screw goes, the front curvature of the magazine well, and the area above and through the recoil lug. These areas are the ones where I removed the roughly 1/2" material. The roughness/chatter was cleaned up later, but here is before I did so:

Wood Composite material Asphalt Metal Road surface

Wood Road surface Asphalt Bumper Automotive exterior

Brown Wood Rectangle Road surface Asphalt

Road surface Wood Asphalt Wall Bumper

Wood Door Household hardware Tool Tints and shades

Musical instrument Wood String instrument Folk instrument Asphalt


I had similar issues with fitting the magazine well/trigger guard and ended up lengthening that area forward and recontouring the bottom of the stock. The forend also needed some recontouring to fit the reproduction front band I used, and had to remove material on the handguard front end, and inside the belly of the stock to allow the cleaning rod to line up properly with the cleaning rod catch. I also had to drill the hole for the front band spring.

IMPORTANT TO NOTE: Although my rifle originally had the recoil lug laying flat in the stock, I had to orient the recoil lug vertically in order for the bearing surfaces to work. It wasn't correct to the manufacturer, but it is something that was done. Otherwise, the recoil lug position would be too far forward to allow the action to sit in the stock. I figured this was easier than cutting in a new recoil lug position and filling in the old one, which wouldn't have looked very pretty. Another important thing... the wood used seemed to still be "green". Because I removed the finish and then used a campfire to add some artificial aging/darkening to the stock imitating old oil stains and to bring out the grain pattern, the stock actually shrunk and shortened slightly. Then I had to lengthen the magazine well again. I guess I basically kiln dried it at that point.

Anywho, I still need to do some patchwork around the recoil lug were I re-cut the channel inside the circle since I changed the orientation of the lug flat. It looks like a + sign at this time as shown above. Otherwise, I think it works pretty good. I think I only paid around $130 for my stock, so I didn't mind having to do a little legwork. If any of this is unclear or you want me to address further, please let me know!
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
I use lipstick as a marking compound. The cheaper the better. Sometimes heating the metal a little makes it go on a bit smoother. It wont rust the metal and cleans off with brake cleaner.

Wear a dress when you buy it and you wont get as many strange looks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Glad to hear you got it sorted out! I'll add my stuff below just in case somebody else gets one of these and finds the same issue. I mostly used a dremel and a metal grinding bit which I found worked very well, despite it not being for this purpose. Other tools included various sized chisels, files/rasps of various sizes, and a belt sander.

Ok, have a bit of time now to elaborate... here is a picture of the finished product to maybe give you some motivation lol
View attachment 4021977

Here are a few images of areas I removed. The worst spots were at the rear of the receiver on the little foot where the rear-most screw goes, the front curvature of the magazine well, and the area above and through the recoil lug. These areas are the ones where I removed the roughly 1/2" material. The roughness/chatter was cleaned up later, but here is before I did so:

View attachment 4021971
View attachment 4021976
View attachment 4021975
View attachment 4021974
View attachment 4021973
View attachment 4021972

I had similar issues with fitting the magazine well/trigger guard and ended up lengthening that area forward and recontouring the bottom of the stock. The forend also needed some recontouring to fit the reproduction front band I used, and had to remove material on the handguard front end, and inside the belly of the stock to allow the cleaning rod to line up properly with the cleaning rod catch. I also had to drill the hole for the front band spring.

IMPORTANT TO NOTE: Although my rifle originally had the recoil lug laying flat in the stock, I had to orient the recoil lug vertically in order for the bearing surfaces to work. It wasn't correct to the manufacturer, but it is something that was done. Otherwise, the recoil lug position would be too far forward to allow the action to sit in the stock. I figured this was easier than cutting in a new recoil lug position and filling in the old one, which wouldn't have looked very pretty. Another important thing... the wood used seemed to still be "green". Because I removed the finish and then used a campfire to add some artificial aging/darkening to the stock imitating old oil stains and to bring out the grain pattern, the stock actually shrunk and shortened slightly. Then I had to lengthen the magazine well again. I guess I basically kiln dried it at that point.

Anywho, I still need to do some patchwork around the recoil lug were I re-cut the channel inside the circle since I changed the orientation of the lug flat. It looks like a + sign at this time as shown above. Otherwise, I think it works pretty good. I think I only paid around $130 for my stock, so I didn't mind having to do a little legwork. If any of this is unclear or you want me to address further, please let me know!
The cuts you’ve made look almost identical to what I had to do. I’m probably right there at the end as far as fitment, but the trigger guard already has a massive gap where the it should fit into the stock. I think I’m gonna shelve this for a little while. This thing is just straight up hideous. I told the seller his reproduction had me mill out at least 40% of the work and that was unacceptable and he blocked me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
The cuts you’ve made look almost identical to what I had to do. I’m probably right there at the end as far as fitment, but the trigger guard already has a massive gap where the it should fit into the stock. I think I’m gonna shelve this for a little while. This thing is just straight up hideous. I told the seller his reproduction had me mill out at least 40% of the work and that was unacceptable and he blocked me.
Sometimes we just have to know when we're licked. Always a good idea to try again later if you feel frustrated... it happens to me more often than I'd like to admit. Whenever you get around to it again, feel free to PM me if you'd like. Or if you manage to grab one of those Fox stocks that would save the headache lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Those stocks are absolute trash and the seller should be ashamed to even sell them. There is not one area on it that doesnt have to be worked. If you dont have patience to get a Fox Stock then Murrays is another decent choice. These "best" poland stocks are great for firewood. I am sorry that you had to go through this and find out the hard way!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,426 Posts
I am debating on letting mine go, its a mismatch panel cut AC44. What do you think would be a reasonable price?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
These "best stocks from Poland" eBay sellers are riding the coat tails of Fox stocks. They are betting on confused buyers thinking they are purchasing something as good as a Fox stock at a fraction of the Fox price.
I avoid these guys as much as I avoid Eastern European sellers offering "NOS" metal parts caked in thick layers of grease. And those offering bzz, Kurz Patr. or P or L marked ZF4 scopes.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top