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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How were the Husquavarna oil finish stocks done in the 1950 -19 70 time frame and with what materials ?

Thank you
Glenn
 

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Seems like this was discussed on the Old Old Forum a long time ago. I suspect the post didn't make the transition.

IIRC: HVA did not use an oil-finish, technically-speaking, but rather some form of linseed-oil-based varnish.

Of course, the last rifles had a lacquer of some sort applied.

Anybody remember the details and actual application process?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you LeeSpeed. That is the reason that I asked this question here. Any further information on this subject would be appreciated.
Glenn
 

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In the book "Husqvarna Jaktvapen" there is just the mention that the stocks were oiled, waxed, and then polished, but it does not tell what type of oil was used.
 

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read once they where oiled then waxed

maybe later ill come across that writing:confused:<><school teacher
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any more thoughts on this subject ?

I am considering Tung oil lightly applied every where except the bedding as a finish -this stock is glass bedded . This is to preserve and stabilize the stock against moisture while hunting.

Comments? Observations?

Thank you
Glenn
 

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tung

I'm interested too.

I have done quite a few stocks in linseed, both sanded in and merely hand rubbed.

I am going to try satin tung oil on an FN Mauser here soon.

Anybody have any idea if the result will be similar to factory HVA??
 

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I now prefer True Oil for all my stocks - I rub it back with pumice (rotten stone) if I want to satin or dull the finish, or can make a Weatherby/Browning plastic looking finish if ordered, all with the same stuff. I recently re-finished a Belgium Browning for a friend who wanted it 'original' looking and it came out identical to as when it was brand new. Just takes a bit of work is all - about 50 coats in all, sanded back to wood about 4 times. It was a soft wood but beautifully figured stock, with deep grain structure.
: I've used linspeed, spar varnish, tung oil, teak oil, permalynn and bacon grease as well. I prefer the true oil.
 

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Me too, ditto. You rub the stock by hand with very little True Oil until you feel you hand is not slding anymore. Repeat that 5 - 10 times for a very lustre finish or use as per Daryl's stome or a 000 steel wool to break the lustre... and give it a "wet" look.
 

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I use Barabal's method but with Tung Oil. Glossy if you rub just a drop fast with your palm until it's hot and dry, repeating over the whole stock, or less glossy/matt if you don't get so wild or cut the gloss with with 6 "O" or 000000 steel wool after the hand rubs. Repeated oiling and cutting back will fill the poors if you want an all smooth finish, don't use so many coats if you like the look with the grain not fully filled. That looks nicer to me on an old rifle, more like I find common pre-war production rifles. Tung has a nicer warm tone as it ages, I think. Like the 1903 Springfields, which were tung oiled in production. I just like Tung better than Linseed finishes.
 

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I use a combination of Spar varnish, Watco Danish oil, and mineral spirits in equal parts. I get a real nice in the wood finish that is virtually waterproof and resists uv deterioration.
 

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I use a combination of Spar varnish, Watco Danish oil, and mineral spirits in equal parts. I get a real nice in the wood finish that is virtually waterproof and resists uv deterioration.
What you end up with is basically Tru-Oil. Just much less expensive :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thank you for the information . I used Linspeed on my Anschutz M 64 ( C.I.L. 190 ) sporter rifle as my first stock refinish. The finish was easy to do and stood up very well for over thirty years . But I had to rebed that rifle several times over the years when that stock moved slightly with climate or location changes. I intend to seal this with a epoxy base and final finish with tung oil soon . Maybe this will finally solve that problem.

On that Husquavarna stock a light cleaning and a few coats of tung oil should do it - a fine matt finish for a hunting rifle. Possibly a final rub with some beeswax.

Glenn
 
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