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This just made me realize: Instead of B-17 rides, the future will be Huey rides

I had the pleasure of seeing the B-17 "Nine-O-Nine" at a local airshow and I was able to climb around inside and take a bunch of photos and chit chat with the crew. I was shocked several years later to hear it crashed while flying with a group of passengers, most of whom didn't survive. I would have paid to fly in that aircraft without a second thought if I hadn't been flat broke at the time.
 

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This just made me realize: Instead of B-17 rides, the future will be Huey rides

Not if they expect me to be in it. One of those things already tried to kill me and that's once too many, even if it didn't succeed. No more opportunities shall be offered.

Actually, don't have any intention toward getting in ANY helicopter for a flight. I neither like nor trust them. Just one nut between me and eternity and i prefer at least a little bit of redundancy...
 

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The safety record of rotary wing craft is dismal when compared with that of fixed wing craft. Offshore workers die almost every year. Their commute to platforms is much more dangerous than the work itself on the rigs and drillships.

This very interesting chart was published after the helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant crashed (I take neither credit nor responsibility for its accuracy):
Transportation modeDeath index
Airlines1
Intercity rail (Amtrak)20.0
Scheduled charter flights34.3
Mass transit (rail and bus)49.8
Non-scheduled charter flights59.5
Non-scheduled helicopter flights63.0
General aviation (like private planes)271.7
Driving or riding in a car/SUV453.6

Commercial airline travel is extraordinarily safe. Every other mode of transportation other general aviation and driving in a car (where amateurs are at the helm) is safer than helicopters, relatively speaking. Of course, there are lots of places that you can get to ONLY via helicopter, so sometimes these sobering numbers just don't matter.
 

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I flew UH1H Medavac Helicopters in South Korea. I was an Aircraft maintenance Office (Test Pilot) in 1974. We had several satellite locations throughout South Korean for Medical Evacuation. One night I got a call that a Medivac aircraft, at Oson Airforce Base, had developed a vibration. I flew a replacement UH1H Medivac Helicopter to Oson as a replacement. I preflight the Helicopter with the vibration but did not find any problems. I surmised that the trim tabs, on the rotor blades, had been jarred, causing the vibration. I took off with a crew chief as my left seat. At about 25 knots, I felt a vibration and kept the aircraft speed to 25 knots. A UH1H usually flew at 90km to 100km. I arrived back at the compound late. The next morning I told the Maintenance NCO to check out the aircraft. Between the Rotating Rotor Head and the Swashplate, on the top of the transmission, there is a link shaped like a pork chop. Two bearing at the top and one connected to the transmission, with a trunnion bearing and bolt. See Diagram above. The Maintenance Sergeant came to me with the trunnion bolt. It was worn half way through. It had rotated so that I could not detect it during preflight. A cat has 9 lives. I am not sure how many I have left.

kaydee
Dwight Brown
 

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Having had a few hours ( :ROFLMAO: ) riding in UH-1H "Hueys" as a Crew chief in the U.S. Army.

Numerous close calls and engine failures, but never crashed. :)

My heart is sad for the victims. :(

The UH-1 is a work horse and reliable helicopter. If I had to fly again.... a "Huey" would be it! :cool:
 
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The safety record of rotary wing craft is dismal when compared with that of fixed wing craft. Offshore workers die almost every year. Their commute to platforms is much more dangerous than the work itself on the rigs and drillships.

This very interesting chart was published after the helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant crashed (I take neither credit nor responsibility for its accuracy):
Transportation modeDeath index
Airlines1
Intercity rail (Amtrak)20.0
Scheduled charter flights34.3
Mass transit (rail and bus)49.8
Non-scheduled charter flights59.5
Non-scheduled helicopter flights63.0
General aviation (like private planes)271.7
Driving or riding in a car/SUV453.6

Commercial airline travel is extraordinarily safe. Every other mode of transportation other general aviation and driving in a car (where amateurs are at the helm) is safer than helicopters, relatively speaking. Of course, there are lots of places that you can get to ONLY via helicopter, so sometimes these sobering numbers just don't matter.


Majority of helicopter accidents and fatalities were in the "Personal/Private" category. Most common cause of helicopter accidents is Pilot Error.
Flew 33 years in the Gulf of Mexico, single engine, multi engine, day, night, VFR, IFR. Never got my feet wet.
Just luck, I guess...
 

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Popular misconception regarding "hellocoppers" is that they actually fly; they don't fly they just beat the air into submission.
 

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Popular misconception regarding "hellocoppers" is that they actually fly; they don't fly they just beat the air into submission.
I find myself in agreement with that proposition.

My first encounter with the evil and wicked disposition of helicopters was in February of 1967, involving a CH-34. It decided, for reasons never fully determined, to over rev on start after a halt for fuel at Marville RCAF Station, Montmedy am Meuse, France. Over rev enough to throw the cooling fan on the back of the R-1820 (had to look that up, couldn't recall WHICH radial it had) it had for power. Same engine that (among other things) the B-17 used. Result including sparks, a ruptured fuel cell and fire, and a big hole (big enough for a person to stick his head out of) in the upper fuselage of an RCAF C-130 parked a bit down the parking area. There were a couple of others in Vietnam, one involving an OH-6 and one a Huey. Have to admit the Loach had been provoked (hole poked in the oil tank that wasn't noticed) but the damp Huey just decided to quit and had to autorotate down - in the bloody middle of War Zone C.... I don't trust helicopters and suspect that they are out to get me. I wish to deprive them of the opportunity.
 

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The safety record of rotary wing craft is dismal when compared with that of fixed wing craft. Offshore workers die almost every year. Their commute to platforms is much more dangerous than the work itself on the rigs and drillships.

This very interesting chart was published after the helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant crashed (I take neither credit nor responsibility for its accuracy):
Transportation modeDeath index
Airlines1
Intercity rail (Amtrak)20.0
Scheduled charter flights34.3
Mass transit (rail and bus)49.8
Non-scheduled charter flights59.5
Non-scheduled helicopter flights63.0
General aviation (like private planes)271.7
Driving or riding in a car/SUV453.6

Commercial airline travel is extraordinarily safe. Every other mode of transportation other general aviation and driving in a car (where amateurs are at the helm) is safer than helicopters, relatively speaking. Of course, there are lots of places that you can get to ONLY via helicopter, so sometimes these sobering numbers just don't matter.
Nothing on motorcycles. Nothing on fishing boats or anything marine. It would be interesting to compare bicycles to motorcycles. Or even walking? There is safety and there is the illusion of safety. Like gun laws. But; logical or not, I agree, no desire here to take any helicopter flights.
 

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Warbirds seem to have have a surprising number of accidents, or maybe they are more publicized.

We will have to see what the accident cause was.
For the number of hours flown, appears they do. Though they also get a lot of publicity when it happens.

All the prop-driven war birds are old, they all need a LOT of maintenance, and the drivers mostly don't get as much time as they would like (and need). Plus the things were built to break things and kill people, with safe operation a matter of lesser importance. In other words, they tend to be sort of dangerous and tricky to fly, so accidents are to be expected (look into the number of non-operational losses back "in the day").

This bird was Hubschrauber. They are ALL constantly looking for a chance to crash and burn.
 

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I flew into BIAP on an Embassy Air Huey…..the ones with a gold stripe that covered up the Army markings…..
I was the Department of State's Chief of Flight Standardization in a former life, flew single- and twin-engined UH-1s, S-71s, CH-46s. Flew UH-1H/Vs, OH-58Cs, and UH-60A/Ls in the Army for 25 years before that. Helicopters are safe to fly in, but they require intensive maintenance and respect for their quirks..or they will kill you.
 

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For the number of hours flown, appears they do. Though they also get a lot of publicity when it happens.

All the prop-driven war birds are old, they all need a LOT of maintenance, and the drivers mostly don't get as much time as they would like (and need). Plus the things were built to break things and kill people, with safe operation a matter of lesser importance. In other words, they tend to be sort of dangerous and tricky to fly, so accidents are to be expected (look into the number of non-operational losses back "in the day").

This bird was Hubschrauber. They are ALL constantly looking for a chance to crash and burn.
I saw a picture of an airplane that looked like it went through a bread slicer. It was a small plane and it turns out the plane behind it in the queue was a WW2 tail dragger and they simply could not see the plane in front of them, the prop sliced through the fuselage in even strokes...
 
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